86th Annual Meeting – Mayors and Business Leaders Breakfast

86th Annual Meeting – Mayors and Business Leaders Breakfast


(“By Your Side” by Sade) ♪ I will show you you’re so
much better than you know ♪ ♪ When you’re lost and you’re alone ♪ ♪ And you can’t get back again ♪ ♪ I will find you darling
I’ll bring you home ♪ ♪ And if you want to cry ♪ ♪ I am here to dry your eyes ♪ ♪ In no time you’ll be fine ♪ ♪ You think I’d leave your side baby ♪ ♪ You know me better than that ♪ ♪ You think I’d leave you down ♪ ♪ When you’re down on your knees ♪ ♪ I wouldn’t do that ♪ ♪ I’ll tell you you’re
right when you want ♪ ♪ If only you could see into me ♪ ♪ Oh when you’re cold ♪ ♪ I’ll be there ♪ ♪ Hold you tight to me ♪ ♪ Oh when you’re low ♪ ♪ I’ll be there by your side ♪ ♪ Babe it’s like this ♪ ♪ And oh when you’re cold ♪ ♪ I’ll be there ♪ ♪ Hold you tight to me ♪ ♪ Oh when you’re low ♪ ♪ I’ll be there by your side baby ♪ – Good morning everyone. Good morning, Mayor Couse, Mayor Lydia. Thank you all for joining
us at this early hour for the Mayors and
Business Leaders Breakfast. It is nice, bright, and early, and we appreciate you
all making the effort to be here this morning. I’m Steve Benjamin, the Mayor
of Columbia, South Carolina, and President of the United
States Conference of Mayors. Carolyn Goodman, our fantastic Chair of the Mayors Business
Council from Las Vegas is unable to attend this year’s meeting, so in her absence, I’m pleased to preside
over today’s breakfast. To get us started, I’d like
to thank Wells Fargo again, a great member of our Business
Round Table and sponsor, for sponsoring this breakfast, please. (audience applauds) And now I’d like to welcome
to the stage my friend, the CEO and Executive Director of the United States Conference
of Mayors, Tom Cochran. Tom, fantastic job you guys are doing, pulling us all together, looks awesome. Tom Cochran. – Thank you, Mayor. (audience applauds) Welcome, everyone, for being at our Business
Council Breakfast. I just wanted to make two or three
housekeeping announcements. Number one, Mayor Walsh has
invited us to join him today in Boston Pride March. It’s gonna be a big march, but we’re gonna have our
march inside the big march. So, we will adjourn the day at 11:30, and we ask mayors that
would wanna be with us, Mayor Benjamin, I will
see you in the lobby on the first floor. And so you will be directed. It will be an abbreviated march. It will be 30 minutes. We won’t go all the way to City Hall. We’re there to stand
united with the community here in Boston and throughout the nation. And so, I want you to please remind you to be back here for our luncheon at 1:00. We have the City Livability Luncheon, the 39th City Livability Luncheon. This is our oldest with Waste Management. So those two things I wanted
to mention this morning. If you could spread the word that our march, the Mayors March, will start at 11:45, and be in the lobby on the first floor to join me and President Benjamin. Today, the Business
Council has 139 members. It wasn’t too long ago that we
started this Business Council and it has grown to 139 over the years. We find in our surveys of
members that come to this meeting that business contact, small
business and large business, are a big part of why
they want to be here. I would like to direct your attention to the screen behind me. First you’ll see a list of the conference’s Platinum Partners. We are grateful to these organizations providing generous, long-term support to the Conference of Mayors,
and the mayors of this nation. I would like to also recognize the Business Council members
who have served over 10 years. These organizations have
stayed and been active with us for a decade, as we… (audience applauds) Thank you for sticking with
us, and just stay stuck, because we’re gonna keep going with this great President we’ve got. It’s just begun. Then we have a listing of our new members, 17 organizations that have joined our Mayors Business Council since our January meeting in Washington. So welcome to all the new
members of the Business Council. (audience applauds) Every organization has to
have a steering committee. You can’t run anything
without a committee, so we got one, and we’re very proud of it. I will now display the new Business Council
Steering Committee. Congratulations to the new elected Steering Committee members. (audience applauds) Tyrone Bland, Herbalife, Terri Williams, American
Heart Association, Vikrum Aiyer, Postmates, Cynthia Stewart, International
Council of Shopping Centers, Eyal Feder, ZenCity, and David Goldwater, Stantec Consulting. I would also like to congratulate our new Chair of our Steering
Committee, Javier Angulo, the Senior Director of
Community Relations at Walmart. (audience applauds) We have today the Co-Chair
of the Business Council, and I’d like to call up our Business Council
Steering Committee Co-Chair, Amy Curran of CGI, for a few remarks. Amy. (audience applauds) – Good morning, everyone. It’s great to be here. I’d like to start by welcoming all of the new Business Council members that have joined since January, along with the new
Steering Committee members, and I look forward to working
with you all so much closer in the year ahead. My fellow Co-Chair, Kim Pasquali of HDR, I’ve had the pleasure of serving
with her over the last year and unfortunately, she
couldn’t be with us today, but it’s for very good reason. She just welcomed a new
addition to her family, a beautiful baby boy. So we are sending well wishes her way. Please know how much
she wanted to be here, and of course, how much we appreciate her unwavering commitment
to this organization. When cities collaborate with
businesses great things happen. This was the fourth year of
our Best Practice report. And Mayors, I encourage all of you to read the almost 30 submissions about the great work our
Business Council members do to improve the quality
of life in your cities every single day. We’re truly partners in building a stronger America together. And I want to personally thank all of the Business Council
members who contribute to the success of this
organization every year. And lastly, it’s been an absolute pleasure to serve as Co-Chair, especially surrounded by
so many incredible women. I would like to give a special
thank you to Mayor Goodman for helping the Business Council thrive. And of course, Jerry and Judy,
for working so tirelessly to help grow the Business
Council to 139 members strong. We’re so lucky to have you, and your support and passion
are greatly appreciated. So thank you mayors, for the work that you do
in your cities every day, and please enjoy your breakfast. (audience applauds). – Thank you, Amy, for
your continued service. We look forward to the coming
year with your leadership. And I wanted to also
just amplify a little bit of the Best Practices report. 26 Business Council members have submitted their best of the best this year, and this report will be available, at the Conference of Mayors, to members for the next couple of weeks, and will be mailed out to
approximately 1,400 Mayors throughout the United States. And we wanna thank all the 26 members that participated in this report. And a special shout-out to the former Chairs of
the Business Council, and to the one and only Doug
Palmer, who was a mayor, who was President of this organization, and who, it was his idea, I think, with Mister Papa from Walgreens, to have this report. It’s very important, I think, when you look at the lack
of funds that we have coming from Washington these days, to show that nothing’s
gonna stop our cities, and nothing’s gonna stop our business, business of America working for mayors to keep this great nation going. So with that, I’d like to turn it over back to the great President,
Mayor Steve Benjamin, of Columbia, South Carolina. (audience applauds) – Thank you, Tom, and thank
you, Amy, for your leadership on the Business Council
Steering Committee. We look forward to working with Amy, and our newly-elected Co-Chair,
Javier Angulo of Walmart, and all of you Steering Committee members in the coming year. At this time, I want you to join me in welcoming to the stage
Wells Fargo’s Martin Sundquist. Martin has been a regular here, and through Wells Fargo,
a fantastic supporter of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. He’s the Senior Vice President of Customer and Community Programs, and the head of Wells
Fargo’s Housing Foundation at Wells Fargo Home Lending. In this role, he oversees national
philanthropic initiatives, community outreach military
team member support programs, and the integration of sustainable
home ownership programs across home lending,
Wells Fargo affiliates, and the Wells Fargo bank. Martin, it’s your time, brother. (audience applauds) – Thank you, President. Thank you, Mayors. And good morning, everyone. I’m Martin Sundquist, Executive Director of the
Wells Fargo Housing Foundation, and it’s my pleasure to
be here with you today, to connect with you and share some of the
work that we’re doing, and hear the great work that you are doing in your communities. Specifically, I want to share with you about our NeighborhoodLIFT programs, and how they’re one of
the more effective ways that we are working in
communities across the country to help people enter into home ownership. So as I introduce the program to you, let me first talk about the
components of the program. First, we provide down payment assistance, and this is a forgivable grant that’s made to a consumer
to purchase a home. Second, we provide grants locally that help with sustainability and neighborhood revitalization efforts. And third, we provide
home buyer education. In fact, home ownership counseling is one of the requirements to get a down payment assistance grant. So across America, more than 17,600, 17,600 individuals and families have become homeowners
because of this program. And to date, we’ve been in 59
markets across the country, soon to be 60, which I’ll
talk about in a moment. And some of you in this room, I think, have seen this program in
action in your communities. Before I share more about the program, I wanna just share a brief video with you, and we’ll hear from a family who’s been a part of this program. So let’s roll the video. – [Amanda] Come on. Come on. – [Announcer] Ever
Since moving to Arizona, Amanda Nash always lived in apartments. – And being a renter, you just definitely don’t
have that stability. Good girl! – [Amanda Voiceover] And so, I really wanted to be a homeowner. I put it on the list of things to do. – It didn’t really seem possible. I just thought we were dreaming. – [Announcer] Until Amanda
learned about NeighborhoodLIFT. The program was created by Wells Fargo and NeighborWorks America, a nonprofit dedicated to
stabilizing communities. LIFT programs have created
homeowners across the U.S. NeighborWorks America
works with local nonprofits like Trellis, in Phoenix,
on home buyer education and other services. Wells Fargo offers matching
down payment assistance grants. – Well, the reactions that we receive for customers that receive the
down payment assistance grant is truly excitement. – [Announcer] Amanda enrolled in a class, then applied for down payment assistance. – Amanda Nash is just
one of the great stories where homeowners come
to our education class and really understand the process. They can let go of that fear of not knowing what they’re doing. – It made me think, this is actually
possible, and I can do it. One of the conditions with the LIFT grant was that we had to live
here for five years, and I was like, yes! I can’t wait to live
someplace for five years. Hi, Miss Nadia. – [Amanda Voiceover] Having that grant just really helped put us in a position where we could buy a home
in a better neighborhood that was still affordable. The benefit that we have of
buying the house using the LIFT is our mortgage is definitely less than what we were paying
in rent previously. – All right, your turn, go. And I just love that it’s a place where people can come and feel welcome, and like
they’re a part of our home too, ’cause it’s really all about family. (Family laughs) – [Announcer] A blended family
that includes grandchildren and foreign exchange students. – [Amanda Voiceover] Having a home, and having the extra bedroom was more than just having a family for me. It was also about creating opportunities for other people. – Seeing my family together, having good times in my home is priceless. – All right, well watching, thank you. (audience applauds) Watching this family’s story,
and hearing the outcome, and how LIFT has helped that family, it’s just a wonderful thing, and I’m proud to be a part of that. And to see them feel empowered,
and enjoying their new home, and knowing that thousands of
other families and individuals across the country are
experiencing the same thing because of the program. We’re six years in on this program, and we’re reaching nearly
four hundred million dollars in our commitment to the program, with over 35,000 potential home buyers attending our launch events. We recently launched in Atlanta. Anyone from Atlanta in the room? All right, there’s Atlanta. We recently launched in Atlanta, and in Atlanta, customers receive $15,000 in down payment assistance. This is a forgivable grant, so if you stay in the home for five years, you earn that full value. And what I’m really
happy to share with you is we’ve added a new
component to the program, and that is if you are a first responder, if you are a teacher, if you are active or retired military, you get an additional $2,500
of down payment assistance. So those that give to your
city can live in your city. So I’m pleased to share
that, in 20 short days, we’ll be right here in Boston, in our 60th launch in six years, and that’s scheduled
for June 29th and 30th. So we’re gonna be happy to be back here, bringing the great program to Boston. It makes me happy to see families happy, and with that, I’ll leave it at that. And I wanna thank you for the honor of being with you this morning, and I wish you the best conference. Thank you. (audience applauds) – Well thank Martin, thank Wells Fargo. For the final segment of our breakfast, I’d like to turn the program over to my colleague and friend, South Bend Mayor Poot Buttigieg, who’s gonna moderate our panel on Workforce Training in
the Age of Automation. As we bring Mayor Pete
and the panelists onstage, I’d like to thank the panel sponsors, McDonald’s Corporation, and we’d like to also acknowledge our U.S. Conference of Mayors
Workforce Development Council Board President, Judy McDonald, Executive Director of WorkForce Solutions for Tarrant County, Judy, please, please. (audience applauds) We wanna thank the WDC for its support of our panel this morning. So, Mayor Pete, stage is yours, man. (audience applauds) – Good morning. If there is any doubt that mayors are the level of government where the most energy and
problem-solving happens, let it be settled by the number of people willing to be discussing these issues at this hour on a beautiful Saturday. My name is Pete Buttigieg. I have the privilege of serving as Mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and also as Chair of the
U.S. Conference of Mayors Automation Task Force, and we’ve been looking
forward to this morning’s plenary panel discussion on Workforce Training in
the Age of Automation. I wanna begin by pointing out this is going to be an
interactive session, so this is one case when it
will not hurt my feelings if you are paying
attention to your screen. We are working with Slido.com, and if you haven’t already logged in, we invite you to do so now. The website is linked if
you’re on the USCM app for this convening. Or you can just go to a
browser and key in Slido.com. I think sli.do will also do the trick. There’s a code. You can see the hashtag
on the screen, somewhere. That’s #uscm2018, and
when you key in that code, as you go to Slido.com, it’s gonna kick you to a
page that we’ll be using to begin answering and
asking survey questions, through this website, on
your devices as we go. And you’ll see instructions on your tables as well as on screen. So let’s get underway. We’re gonna be examining today the future of work in a
rapidly changing economy, as innovation, automation,
and artificial intelligence fundamentally alter the ways
in which Americans work. This is a kind of technology
that has very quickly moved from the stuff of science fiction to our everyday, lived experience. We’re using it in medicine,
to read X-rays and MRIs, and in the financial
sector, for stock trading. Soon, AI will be found
touching every industry, and in some way, directly or indirectly, every job around the world. And as we’re already
surrounded by smart machines running on incredibly powerful, self-learning software programs, we notice that technologies that didn’t even exist 10 years ago are now taken for granted. So this brings me to our first question, hopefully, you’ve been able to
cue up Slido on your device, and it is this, we’ll give
folks a minute to respond, which of the following technologies
are most transformative, ridesharing, digital assistants,
or self-service kiosks? I’m just gonna go ahead and vote, and invite you to do the same. Later on, we’ll be having a
discussion about voter turnout. (audience laughs) So hopefully, this will
establish a good precedent. That’s pretty good. Could we break the hundred? There we go. All right. Looks like a pretty clear winner. Not a surprising one for
those of us who are involved in regulating how people move around and helping to improve it. All right. With any technological transformation, this affects the future of work. Workers are facing
uncertainty, insecurity, transformation about where they fit at a time when my generation
is likely to change careers more often than my parents’
generation changed jobs. But unlike some of the previous shocks that we’ve experienced economically, we know that this is a shift that we can very much see coming, and so we are responsible for
how we can prepare for it. Our next question on Slido, as we go to question number two, is this: What share of people do
you expect to be at risk, in terms of their jobs,
because of technologies that are currently available? As you think about some of those technologies
emerging around us. And if you were to hazard a guess, there’s actually an emerging consensus, but before the big reveal, let’s see what our attendees think. Look at that turnout, already
into triple digits, all right. Consensus around 35. Give it another minute or two. I had an encounter with an
automated maître d’ recently, in Los Angeles Airport, and
it got me wondering how long before somebody develops
an automated mayor? Hopefully, that’s a little further off. Looks like the consensus of
the room is forming around 35%. If you do a scan of the
literature around this, and the reports that have
emerged in recent years, the number’s actually
converging around 50% or higher. As leaders of our nation’s cities, we have to prepare our residents
for this coming change. We cannot offer false promises
about turning back the clock. And as some jobs are fading
out of the marketplace, we have a responsibility
to prepare our workers to navigate what comes next. Those who succeed in the phase
to come will not necessarily be those who have to create new machines, but those who can figure
out what to do with them. And by instilling a culture of lifelong learning and
training opportunities in our cities, we can make sure that, in an age of intelligent machines, our residents can continue
to find their place. But if we don’t deliver,
many will struggle, especially our most vulnerable residents with lower levels of income,
education, or skills. Which brings us to our next question. How many people in this room, and how concerned are you, I should say, about the ability of low-wage
and low-income workers to support their families being impacted by artificial intelligence and automation? Cue up the next question. There we go, all right. Yep. I’ll look forward to meeting the 2% of optimists in
this room, who are… (audience laughs) not concerned (laughs). Pretty clear answer among this group. All right, well those 2%, feel free to go fetch a cup of coffee. (audience laughs) The rest of us are in for a treat, because if you believe that in any way, these trends are something
that require our attention, they require innovation,
they require creativity on the part of America’s
mayors and cities, then you’re going to benefit a great deal from the speakers who
are on their way out. Let me invite all of our panelists to come on out and take a seat, and then I will introduce
each of them in turn. Our first presenter is
Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. Mayor Durkan is the 56th mayor of Seattle, and is the first woman to lead the city in nearly a century. One of the cornerstones
of her administration has been ensuring that
Seattle’s young people are prepared for the jobs of the future through her Families Education
Preschool and Promise plan. She is working to close the
opportunity gap in her city, to make sure all of her
residents have pathways to good paying jobs and
real economic opportunity. Shockingly, the remarks
that were prepared for me do not mention the most
important fact on her resume, which is that she is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, just one of many reasons that we are lucky to hear
her voice this morning. Mayor Durkan. (audience applauds) – Thank you very much, and I’m going very old school on my notes. Thank you for being here. So glad to see so many people
this early in the morning thinking about the future. And I will say that South
Bend, when I went to college, did not have a mayor like
this mayor so, wish we had. I think that, in the age of automation, we have to be looking
at a variety of factors. And I think the truth is that the national government
and even states governments are not dealing with the issue. And they will hit our cities first. Many of us are already seeing the results of continuing automation
in the changing economy. In Seattle, we have an
amazing economy right now, but the economy that is rising is what I call the new innovation economy. And the old economy is being,
is not as rising as quickly, and that gap is causing great inequities. And as we continue to innovate, and that technology increases, I think we will see a
period of time in history that is more displacing than
the Industrial Revolution. And that we as mayors are
going to have the obligation, the need, to make sure that
we innovate as quickly, and that we protect our
families, our workforces, and our jobs. Workforce training doesn’t just
mean skills and retraining. That was a very 90s approach, how do we “retrain” people
as the economy shifts? We have to be looking at not only what are those job skill sets, but what is the creativity that’s needed from workplace to workplace. More and more, particularly
in millennial generations, people stay in a workplace
only about two to three years. Two to three years. In our generation, the
generation before me, people would stay a lifetime. So as people move laterally,
from business to business, they have to bring with them skill sets. We also know they have to
bring with them benefits, because as we are increasingly going to what’s called the gig
economy, and people move, and don’t have the benefits
of the last economy, we will see displacement
in all of our cities, because they will come to
the end of their careers, or in between jobs, and many
of them will need the services that we know fall upon our cities. We can’t afford to forget also the importance of creative training, which I’m gonna be talking
about in just a minute. If we are talking about
the impacts of automation, innovation’s fantastic. It’s amazing what you can
do from your phone today. We were just talking that
when I, in my previous job, I had a office in D.C,
and an apartment in D.C., I would get on the plane in Seattle, and right before it would take off, I’d order my groceries for two days, and they’d be there when I arrived. When my plane would touch down in D.C., I’d order my dinner, and it
would be there when I arrived, and I could do it all from my phone. That is an amazing
development in technology, but with it comes a changing workforce. We’ve seen the data that our mayor from
South Bend talked about, but if you look at what’s
going into the future, just from the automation of automobiles, automobiles, and drivers, it’s estimated that sometime
in the next five to seven years as many as 20 million
people could be out of work. Your delivery truck
drivers, your car drivers. We were saying, if my children,
who are teenagers and 21, if they have the choice between walking five blocks in the rain, or calling their pod up on
their car, on their phone, they’re gonna call that automated pod. And so we have to be
thinking, as we innovate, how do we make sure that
those unintended consequences, that we have real policy
discussions around, and we prepare for economically. I think the number one
way to accomplish that is to be focusing, as mayors,
on economic opportunity, real economic opportunity. We have to be able to have
our workforces and our cities prepared for that future. Take a factor from Seattle. We are expecting that, in the Puget Sound Basin in Seattle area, that there will be about 700,000 jobs created in the next five years. 700,000 jobs. Almost, well, the vast majority of them, require post-high-school education. Yet in that region, only 30%
of our kids are getting it. So we have these jobs coming in our line in a mismatch with our educational system. It’s one reason, one of
my signature initiatives, is to try to get two years free college for every Seattle high school graduate. It will change the economy of our city to have that gap between the new economy and the old economy, and really lift up, particularly in communities of color. The other thing I would urge, mayors, when you’re looking at this, as we bring on new technology, and particularly in Seattle, we’re looking at electrifying
our fleets and our cars, we have to make sure that we
are not further making a divide between communities of
color, poor communities, and other communities. Because some of this technology
is just not reachable for communities. So for example, the
electrification of our grid, which we’re trying to do in Seattle, there’s many parts of our city where people don’t have
access to chargers, would never have access to chargers, unless we in the city decide that we’re gonna make
that part of our policy, and work with companies
in the economy to do that. So the Seattle Promise Free Tuition is gonna be a key thing to
drive the economy in our city. Another thing we have is
we have many working adults that have dropped out of the economy or become underemployed. We’ve put together a center
to try to retrain people, give ’em access to other
skills and other jobs. We also have a Creative
Advantage Initiative. We can’t build cities of the future that don’t have a really
vibrant, creative, artistic heart and soul. And so, Seattle, we spend a
lot of time thinking about how do we include the arts
in all of our education, how do we have great public squares. And to do this in our K5,
we’ve doubled, for example, through our Families and Education Levy, the number of music and
visual arts available in K through 12, to make sure that those
classes that get cut first in the education system, music, and those types of electives, that we increase the ability
to have that creative thought. I really believe that that’s
going to put us in the future, the ability to have those kids coming up, to have the education and the work skills, to go across any kind of
business in the future. And it shows that it works. If you look at what companies want in the new technology environment, they are looking for
very creative thinkers. We are seeing that computer scientists and software engineers,
more of them are coming out, so employers are looking at, what are those other
skill bases they have. So I think if you’re
looking, in your city, to start pilots and programs, that’s something you can start right away, in terms of making sure
your schools are innovative, but increase that artistic education. We’re also thinking about
how do we optimize ourselves as a city, as an employer. And so you can look across
your city and your enterprise, and think about how are you
using technology innovation. How are you making sure
that your workplace is one that’s really equity-driven? Are you making sure that
people of color and women are having an equal
opportunity in your workforce? And are you constantly innovating, to be not just more efficient, but to deliver better
services for your city? It is difficult. I’m sure everyone is like Seattle, where the budgets that government has pale in comparison to private industry and the ability to innovate. Sometimes, they joke in my office that the best way to get the
computer systems working better is to feed the squirrels
that keep ’em running. But we can all do better, and if we look down the road at what that new economy’s
going to look like, cities have to lead. We have to be the ones
that are driving it, because we are the ones that
deal with the consequences when it doesn’t work. If you look at every city today, and the challenges we face, in one way or another, it’s because we’re trying
to catch up on something, either in our workforce,
or our infrastructure, or our inclusion. That’s why these three
I’s for this conference. So I’m looking forward
to the panel discussion. Thank you very much, and the next speaker, do you introduce ’em, or do I? (audience applauds) – I’m gonna try my luck
with stage geometry. Oh, they got that done. All right, look at that. Save us coming and going. Thank you, Mayor Durkan, for your leadership and for your remarks. Our next panelist is the
Chief Communications Officer and Executive Vice President
of Corporate Relations for McDonald’s Corporation, Robert Gibbs. Robert leads McDonald’s
Corporate Relations teams, including Corporate Communications,
Government Relations, and External Communications. And if he looks highly familiar to you, but you can’t quite place him, just substitute in your
mind that Lucite podium for that of the White House Briefing Room, and you’ll remember his
days informing America as Press Secretary for President Obama during his first two terms, where he served not only as the
voice of the administration, but as a valued advisor to the President on policy and political matters critical to the administration. We’ve been looking forward
to hearing from him. Please welcome Robert Gibbs. (audience applauds) – Good morning. Thank you, Mayor Benjamin,
for this opportunity, Mayor Pete for your
leadership in this group, and in your community, and to Mayor Durkan, I was telling her, this time last week, my family was in the beautiful city of Seattle, enjoying the blue skies and sun, and walking around in a
just a spectacular city, so thank you. As we’re talking about here today, few issues are more important today, and to our country, and to our cities, than ensuring that we are developing the next generation of workers. Giving people tools,
training, and mentorship are needed to succeed in
a dramatically changing global economy and a
workplace like never before. We’re acutely aware of this
challenge at McDonald’s. More than 37,000 restaurants
in 120 different markets takes good people, a lot of good people, to run great restaurants, and to provide great
experiences to our customers each and every day. Every year in the U.S. alone, our company and our
independent franchisees hire nearly 600,000 young adults. Over 100,000 of those young men and women come from communities with
double the national poverty rate. While all have that tremendous potential, many have been disconnected
from the opportunities they need to develop their talent. The challenge isn’t just
that we need so many workers. At McDonald’s, and nearly every
successful business today, the need is growing for highly talented and highly engaged workers, closing that education gap
that Mayor Durkan talked about. Our business has been undergoing
a massive transformation. That’s what is required to
satisfy the rising expectations of consumers in a fiercely
competitive industry. We’re creating a blend of high-tech and high-touch experiences for customers, including new online ordering, pickup, and delivery services, new
customized menu options, new touchscreen ordering kiosks,
and restaurant experiences offering much greater hospitality,
convenience, and choice. As we continue to introduce
innovations in our restaurants, changes require more from McDonald’s crew to come from out from behind the counter into the front of the restaurants to interact directly with customers, provide greater levels of hospitality, and in managing increasingly
sophisticated technology. Success depends on our
significant and ongoing commitment to training, education,
and development programs. We launched a program in 2015 that we call Archways to Opportunity, and it has been a critical enabler in our workforce development. It was designed to help our
restaurant employees grow no matter where they are on
their educational journey. Over the past three years,
Archway has provided more than 24,000 of our
restaurant employees with opportunities to earn
a high school diploma, receive upfront college
tuition assistance, access free educational advising services, and learn English as a second language. In that time, we’ve given, over $21 million dollars
has been awarded so far for high school and
college tuition assistance. We were happy, in April, to
announce a dramatic expansion and commitment to the
next step in that program. We are nearly tripling the amount of money that a McDonald’s crew member can receive to advance their
education and development, by dedicating $150 million
dollars over the next five years to this program, and
lowering, dramatically, the work length requirement to qualify. In just three months of
employment at a McDonald’s, just a summer job, crew are eligible for $2,500
in tuition assistance. This will provide nearly 400,000
U.S. restaurant employees at McDonald’s with access
to this important program, as we lower those
eligibility requirements. I could go on and on about the enthusiasm and the energy that’s
felt in the restaurants, and with the owner-operators around this, but I will show a short
film, I promise it’s short, to let the film do the talking. Let’s take a look. – Dear Sebastian, after careful consideration
of your application, it is with great pleasure that we offer a congratulations on your acceptance. (crowd cheers) – In the beginning, it
was just me and my mom, and she used to work two jobs. She used to make sure I went to school. – I had a lot of problems at home. I knew people were looking at me like, you’re a high school dropout,
and you sleep in your car. So that was really hard. – I was born in Mexico. I came over here when
I was eight years old. (electronic music) McDonald’s, it teaches you
a lot of people skills. Overall, it just helps
you grow as a person. – After you go through all the training, they teach you the skills
that you need to learn to become very proficient. – You know, when I finally
graduated, I was like, now I can go to college. I just dream of a bigger
future for myself. All of that did start with the
online high school diploma. It’s crazy. (electronic music) – When I walked across the
stage and I grabbed my degree, it was super emotional,
because, look, I’m here, thanks to McDonald’s. – You know, I came from nothing, and to now being a GM, and
having my college degree. I was given all that help, and you know, sometimes, people, that’s all they need. (electronic music) – [Theresa] I feel really
hopeful about my future. I feel like I can…really
achieve anything. (audience applauds) – Thank you. We are tremendously excited
about this important program, and those stories are real. We have six students
graduating from college this morning in Colorado. So it’s making a real difference
in the lives of people. We’re excited too, since announcing the
expansion of this program, that we’ve partnered with nearly 20 mayors and their workforce development programs across the country, from
Newark to Indianapolis to Los Angeles, to encourage, and we encourage all of
you to partner with us, to spread the word and get
your residents employed and on the road to their
educational dreams. Our next step is to build
on the success of Archways and turn our attention to
pre-employment services. You can’t be what you can’t see. How do we support youth living
in disconnected communities who don’t have access to
core job training skills, to help them land their first
or second job and keep it. By bringing restaurant
employees more opportunities to further their education and pursue their career aspirations, we’re helping them find
their full potential, whether it is at McDonald’s,
or elsewhere in their lives. We see firsthand how
life-changing it can be, as you saw in that video, when young people are
given the right tools, and education, and support,
to pursue their ambitions. We’re excited to continue
to build on the success of Archways to Opportunity
by providing those tools, that training, that advancement,
to our restaurant employees and communities throughout the country, in order to prepare them for the hopes, and opportunities, and challenges of the economy of tomorrow. Thank you. (audience applauds) – Thank you, Robert,
for that presentation. Our third panelist is Vikrum Aiyer, my friend, and a Vice President
of Global Public Policy for the on-demand technology
platform Postmates. As Postmates is creating new opportunities for brick-and-mortar businesses
in the era of ecommerce, is also influencing the
way independent workers and automated robotics are
shaping the labor market. Aiyer helps lead the
legislative, regulatory, and policy discussions, at federal, state, and municipal levels, that are impacting the future of work in the on-demand industry. He’s here to tell us more about Postmates, and we hope to spark more dialogue among the mayors here in this room. Vikrum, thanks for joining us. (audience applauds) – Thanks for having us today, and to the U.S. Conference of Mayors, particularly the Business Council. It’s a real incredible forum to convene so many thoughtful
mayors from across the country and really get a chance to kickstart public-private dialogues,
which I know might sound, that P3 concept might sound obvious to many of those in the room, I know it was discussed onstage, but for a younger tech company, that’s a very big deal for us to actually start leaning
into these conversations through forums like this,
so thank you so much. And before I sort of lean
into this, I do wanna say, really appreciate Mayor Pete’s leadership, specifically on the automation workforce. I’ve been very moved by
his thinking around this. Mayor Durkan, we know
that the city of Seattle is constantly tackling, sort of at the state of
the art of policy making, housing challenges,
transportation challenges, so it’s just an honor to
be onstage with you today. And Mister Gibbs, that was an incredible workforce investment announcement, and it’s also an honor to
be onstage with someone who actually can stand at a podium longer than an hour at a time, then deal with the press,
so appreciate that. I wanna start by a very simple notion, that I know is very obvious
to all the mayors in the room, and that’s that commerce is fundamentally changing in cities. For Postmates, we are an
actual, an app-based platform that is a three-sided marketplace. We connect you, the customer, to a merchant in your community, to a courier network of
about 150,000 to 200 couriers that can deliver items on
demand at any given time, right to your doorstep. So, for senior citizens, for
example, with mobility issues, this actually means health
and wellness products can be delivered to your house, so you can still access
goods from your local store, but maintain that sense of dignity. If you’re a younger college
student, for example, and you seem to be hung
over on a Sunday morning, it also means that you
can get food delivered from your local merchants (laughs). But when we say that this
is actually on-demand and delivery of anything,
anytime, anywhere, what we really mean is not
just the convenience economy. And when we talk about
workforce development, I think it’s very easy to
focus on skills and labor, and that’s an important
place to maintain focus. But I wanna zoom out for a little bit, and focus on an entire sector that’s facing incredible global headwinds, and that’s retail. Right now, when you think
of most retail opportunities in your cities that are fueled
by the ecommerce platforms that Mayor Durkan spoke about
in terms of convenience, we think of the Amazon.coms,
the Walmart.coms, incredible businesses that
have created incredible, revved incredible engines
of economic opportunity in our towns. But if you think of it, they’re actually building warehouses on the outskirts of cities, and then funneling goods into town. It’s convenient, we’ve all used it, but it really overlooks
the local retailers. Brick-and-mortar in
each of your communities has faced incredible challenges
in the past couple of years. And one of the most startling statistics coming out of this
administration’s Labor Department, was in January, right on the heels of the holiday shopping
season in December, even though employment numbers
were revving up strongly in a positive direction,
retail numbers were plummeted. Mayors know this all too well. So what we at Postmates actually do, is instead of building that
warehouse outside of a city, we treat the entire city as a warehouse. We index the product
offerings of businesses and what sold within those businesses, and then we connect them to a warehouse-like distribution platform that’s a matching algorithm that allows them to access new customers, that’s a mapping algorithm that allows them to extend
the reach of their sales far beyond just anyone
locally in their neighborhood, and it’s that vast courier network of 150 to 200,000 couriers
delivering in real time. That has really, really
material economic impacts for a brick-and-mortar retailer, a corner store bodega, even
the local hardware store, because now, all of a sudden, instead of getting your
light bulbs, or plungers, or any other household essential items from a major ecommerce platform, you can actually buy it in your community. And that brick-and-mortar retail story is what’s fueling our vision of what workforce development
ought to look like when we talk about the future of work and the on-demand economy. I wanna actually dig into where,
from a policy perspective, we see the biggest elements of
ability to work with mayors. But I wanna just animate a quick story, and that is that even though
our customer base seems to be a more millennial, a more lazy, more convenience-driven economy, when you think about the
notion of 18- to 34-year-olds purchasing at a high rate, we’ve also seen an incredible distribution for those that are on the, that are growing with the
54-and-above demographic, which actually indicates this
notion of younger families and older families starting to realize that time is purchasing power, and being able to connect
to those communities is quite incredible. So if you can actually
retrieve Chick-fil-A on-demand, mattresses on-demand, even moisturizer and lotion on-demand, that might mean that
the EPA administrator’s our target demographic customer too, but it actually means that there is a way in which commerce
is moving in cities in this very, very incredible way. And that has actually created massive economic activity for us. In the last year, $1.2 billion
dollars worth of goods, in 2017 alone, were sold by local businesses
in 300 U.S. cities. That actually resulted in a
3.7 times increase in sales for those brick-and-mortar merchants, as compared to those that
didn’t use on-demand delivery. And that created a
follow-on economic impact of about $6.6 billion in that economy. And that’s really important, because this isn’t just
about our company, Postmates, this is about a lot of
on-demand economy partners that are out there. For every dollar that’s spent,
ostensibly, through that app, that has a ripple effect that allows, at least for our company about
$18 more in additional spend, because now, all of a sudden, storefronts are processing
more order volume. What was typically just confined to the square footage of a
dining room for a restaurant, now their customer base
extends far beyond that. Customers on the other side of town are now requiring them to hire more, to just maintain that order volume, which means increases in jobs,
increases in storefronts, and that follow-on expanded tax base ripples throughout the economy. Now if you take a look at
this at a city-by-city level, we’re particularly proud
of what this has meant. For even a city like Seattle, we’ve been able to see a
three times increase in sales for on-demand partners. In Los Angeles, a 10x increase. In Phoenix, an 8x increase. And as we continue to lean
into this on-demand economy, we’re actually really
proud to not only ensure that the couriers that are
delivering on our platform are making 153% more than
federal minimum wage, but we’re also proud that last year alone, they earned over $216 million dollars. And this is really,
really important to us, because if we found that
a 3.7x increase in sales for brick-and-mortar retail
can help rev the engines of those local economies, today we’re proud to announce that we’re starting to expand our reach beyond those 300 cities. We’re going to, Mayor
Benjamin, who kicked off, kicked us off this morning, we’re going to Columbia, South Carolina. Soon we’ll be trying to map
out our space in Cleveland, in Cincinnati, in Baton
Rouge, in Anchorage, and what we need from mayors
is actually an understanding of where are those isolated
businesses in your community. Are there those small
businesses and merchants who may be of an older generation, and don’t know how to get
on a platform like ours, in the same way that they may not know how to register a business
on Yelp or Google Ads? This is a really, really key component for any young tech company, so that way we can understand, are there
geographically-dislocated regions in your community, or food deserts, that we can plug our app
and our courier network in to figure out a way to
actually service those goods and bring more merchant
delivery to your communities. And if any of you guys are interested in having us expand in your cities, I would love to talk to you about that. Now specifically, when
it comes to automation and our challenges today, we’ve actually been testing
a recent experiment. As I mentioned to you earlier, our Postmates, on average, are
earning about $18 per hour. It’s not the most glamorous wage, but certainly better than
minimum wage in most cities. But right now, if we wanted coffee delivered
from across the street, a Postmates courier would
bring that to us in this hotel. But if it’s across the street, they’re not making much money off of that. That $18 per hour that I mentioned, that’s contingent on runs
that are about, on average, a mile and above. So we said, okay, for
that truly last-mile, less-than-a-mile gap, how can we make sure that that
merchant across the street is not shortchanged,
and not unable to sell just ’cause the Postmate courier doesn’t wanna make that delivery? But at the same time,
how do we make sure that that Postmate courier can make more money, that we’re reserving them
for the meaningful work on the platform that allows them to earn? So we started testing
these robotic deliveries in multiple markets. We started out in Washington D.C., and instead of deploying the robotics and asking for forgiveness later, we’ve actually been working
with local governments. Mayor Bowser in D.C. helped us craft a memorandum and framework
of deployment in that town. We then worked with the
Governor of Virginia. We’ve worked with the Mayor of Austin. We worked with a smattering
of cities in California, and what this has allowed us to do is actually integrate robotics
into our supply chain. And we’ve learned three things. One, we’ve actually had zero job loss, and all of the couriers that
were maintained on the platform have actually been able to earn more money as a result of this. Two, for every one of
these robotic devices that we deploy to a sidewalk, we’ve actually been able to take around 1.7 cars off the road. Now we’re not gonna say that
these little guys on the street are gonna solve for congestion
in your communities, but if you start to think about automation and on-demand delivery as
unique ways to experiment with how you solve for
not just accessing food, how you solve for creating
more brick-and-mortar growth, or how you solve for congestion
patterns, all of a sudden, that P3 concept of a
public-private partnership means light years beyond
what it means to just be a tech company that wants
to work in its own R&D labs, versus government that
seemingly needs to be at odds with tech. Together, we can really create meaningful engagements together. And the third thing that we learned is that merchants and the customers were actually able to
interact with these devices in a meaningful way, and it
didn’t throw off pedestrians that were walking up and down. And I think when it comes to robotics, it’s really important for us to test those qualitative elements. Now of course, I wanted a
level set with this story of what on-demand technology
looks like in your communities, not as a commercial for Postmates, but to let you know what
the economic gains can be. At the end of the day though, we realize that this
is bleeding right into an automation impacting
the workforce debate. Whether we think our numbers show that there’s no job loss or not, we are at the forefront of the fact that automated devices of
delivery modes and logistics are transforming the face of
retail in our communities. Layer on top of that
those 150,000 couriers, or Postmates that I mentioned, they’re independent contractors, much in the same way Lyft
drivers and Uber drivers are, which means that we have
to solve for a safety net that’s evolving with
outdated employment laws, by maintaining a pace of more disaggregated
and independent work. That’s why we’re really proud, with the City of San Francisco,
that we were able to work with the honorable Mayor,
former Mayor Ed Lee, on a gig economy tool kit, that it started routing
independent contractors to health care services in that city, employment services in that city, business licenser requirement
obligations in that city. We’ve also been working with a handful of
upskilling organizations, like the Guild, and JVS, to
actually, as Robert said, figure out how do you actually
expand their opportunity beyond just being on the platform. As much as I love my Postmates
delivering me burritos on that lazy Sunday, we wanna make sure that
they’re not Postmates for life. We wanna make sure that
they’re actually able to see upward mobility,
so we’ve been trying to, with a strong appetite, work
with mayors to figure out what are some educational
programmings that we can amplify through our application, when
we have about 10 million users logging into our app every day, we have a captive, digital set of eyeballs that are tuned into that
application, so how can we promote programs that are going on in your city? We’ve also been able to
work with the City of L.A. and the City of San Francisco
on apprenticeship programs, where we onboard individuals
that maybe don’t have a fancy computer science degree
from Stanford or Harvard, but they’re actually able
to be brought onboard at a tech company like ours,
and learn skills on sites. And we’ve actually worked
with veterans organizations like Swords to Plowshares, because, unbeknownst to us,
Navy vets and Air Force vets are incredible at operating
fleets of robotics, and since that’s a new
working product class for us, that’s a new job class
that we’re able to hire. At the end of the day though, when it comes to how we actually explore all of these new workforce issues, what we really need at our backs is data. Earlier this week, the Trump
Administration released, through the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the first snapshot of how
many workers in America were working in contingent
worker arrangements or alternative worker arrangements, basically independent
contractors, temporary jobs. Unfortunately, that data, which hadn’t been updated since 2005, missed capturing information
that was one of the most momentous historic moments since 2005, the introduction of the iPhone. That BLS, that Bureau of
Labor Statistics data set, didn’t actually ask the question
or release the question, how many of you are finding
work by using online platforms? What we really need moving forward, when it comes to policy
making in the gig economy, how do you create
benefits for individuals? How do you invest in
their upward mobility? It’s a very clear, granular snapshot of what this data looks like in America. And that’s important, because
as Mayor Durkan talked about, we need to be, as a company, talking about portable benefits, how individuals who are
independent contractors, disaggregated from the workforce, are able to access benefits. To Mayor Tubbs’ credit in Stockton, whether you agree with it or not, cities are huge, huge, huge petri dishes of policy experimentation, so running UBI experiments like he has in Stockton, California, or running portable benefits
experiments in other places, are areas where tech companies are very interested in working with you. Because at the end of the day, we would argue at Postmates
that bipartisanship, when it comes to dealing
with the future of work, is not just about blue
collar or white collar. It’s not just about
Republican or Democrat. It’s actually about labor and
industry working together. Because in a massive way,
the company that we create, for all of the economic gains that we’ve had in your communities, we recognize this is causing threats to traditional forms of work. There are debates about what
the future of work looks like, because there’s a misunderstanding of what the dignity of
work will mean tomorrow, based off of what we know the dignity of work has meant today. That means that labor and
tech have to work together, we have to work with mayors, and we have to make sure
that for any of these issues that are policy fixes
for the future of work, are based off of a rigorous,
multi-stakeholder process. And I commit to you, as a tech company that’s
interested in this space, that to the extent that mayors
are willing to work with us, and are open to these conversations, we are very, very game to play ball. Thank you. (audience applauds) – Thank you. That raises so many interesting
and profound questions, and we’ve just got a few
minutes to explore them, but I did wanna invite each
panelist to share a little bit about how you think about timing. So, I know from a City of
South Bend perspective, there’s some decisions that
we’ll be making differently by the end of this year
because of automation. Gear, for example, that we buy, we’ve got trash trucks
now where the robotic arm saves us having a picker
in an injury-prone job to deliver that. Other decisions that are 50-year decisions about where a train station oughta go, where the right answer
might become different because of the technology
that really hits the ground in 10 years or 20 years. So since we have this opportunity, we’ve got a fast-growing
technology company, one of the most
recognizable and established American global companies, and a city that’s known
for looking to the future, but has a very rich
history, I’d love to know, maybe starting with you, Mayor Durkan, how you think we might start to arrange our sort of short-term
versus long-term thinking, and what mayors and those
who work with cities oughta think about when it comes to what needs to change today, and what do we need to have
in the back of our minds as we prepare long beyond
our terms are over. – You know, I think it’s a combination. I think you have to have, the short-term, immediate
answers you have today, you also have to be thinking about, what does that look like
in five, 10, and 15 years? I think the thing we put
up on the screen was, if you imagine yourself
on a rainy Seattle day, and you can either walk the 10 blocks to the Sound Transit Station, or you can hit a app on
your phone, and a pod, a little, autonomous
pod just come get you, which would you do? Because we’re spending
literally billions of dollars to site light rail in
Seattle, fix lines, stations, and are we gonna be agile
enough for the future? So we have to not only
solve the problems of today, how do we do garbage pickup, but as we build this infrastructure, are we really building
for that city of tomorrow? Or are we spending so much money that by the time we’re done, it’s obsolete in five or 10 years. And then we look at AI. Will AI take over some
decisions in government itself? As mayor, I would have liked to have said, Watson, what should we
do about the head tax? (panel laughs) I didn’t say Alexa. I knew that answer. But I really believe that we’ve gotta be
looking at that future, and looking at the small
workplaces and the big workplaces to see what are those
immediate things we can do to be more efficient, but what’s gonna be the
impact down the road? – I agree with everything the Mayor said. I think one of the things
that we have to tackle in this space is, as that, you almost have parallel time tracks here, because you’ve got what is
happening with technology and how that is gonna change work, and understanding that it will take time to change that workforce. So you think about,
there will be different sort of pain points, if you will, on education and training
for somebody that is either, you certainly
have post-high-school or out of high school,
that little older age, but then you’ve got somebody who’s just about to come out of high school, and then you’ve got
three- and five-year-olds that are going into Pre-K or kindergarten. And the real push that,
and I think the imagination that we have to bring to
this discussion and debate is understanding, again,
that we may be moving, that some things are
just immovable in time, even as you have this, again, this rapid
parallel technology shift that will put different, and I
think we’ve just gotta engage partners, businesses,
policy makers, all together, to try to figure out how to, quite frankly, surround these problems, and figure out new and innovative ways to come up with answers. – It feels almost like
there’s a paradox here, where the future state looks beautiful, and all of us can sit back,
and the burrito comes to us, and there’s not much you have to do about it.
– That is Seattle. (panel laughs) – You’re already there.
– Yeah. – But that transition from here to there is one where it creates a lot
of responsibilities for us, whether it’s in policy or
in the corporate space. How, at the outset, Vikrum,
of really, in some ways, a whole new industry forming around you, how do you view that question? – I think we have a lot of insight about the state of the art of technology, and one thing that Germany,
for example, does brilliantly, is make sure that manufacturing sectors that are at the cutting edge
of advanced manufacturing work pretty closely in cahoots with institutions of higher learning, so that way students can
back into the skills required for those jobs as soon as they graduate. I think the onus is on
us on the industry side to really try and invest in
that workforce development, to try and extrapolate
curricula that can be applied to things like algorithms,
things like robotics, and then do our best to
share them with cities, public school districts,
institutions of higher learning, so that way we can work to
invest in that workforce, along the way.
– Makes sense. Well, time flies when you
are discussing the future, so we are nearly at our close already, but hopefully this has
created food for thought. As we go into our other sessions, I’d be remiss if I didn’t
mention that we’ll be having a dedicated discussion about
automation tomorrow afternoon. And one of the things that’s also clear, and maybe I shouldn’t
have picked on the 2 or 3% who didn’t see too much to worry about, (panel laughs) is that automation is also creating jobs. Things are changing, roles are going away, others are going to emerge. There’s the famous example, at least famous among people who geek out on future of work questions, of the ATM, which was believed, at one point, might be the beginning of
the end of retail banking, and it actually led to an increase in employment in retail
banking, but of course, in somewhat different jobs than
before the ATM was invented. So denying that AI or intelligent machines would create opportunities
would be a lack of imagination, but failing to prepare for
the disruption that’ll happen would be a lack of
responsibility on our part. Before we close, we’ve got a
few more questions teed up. The first you can see on the screen, for both Mayors and Business
Council members in the room, is how many of you are
involved in some way with your local workforce
development board? And this is, as they
say, a leading question, because there’s a strong
feeling among the conference that finding some way to be
involved, if you’re not already, if you’re not statutorily involved, finding some way to keep up
with your workforce board is going to be more important than ever, and that leadership is going
to be needed more than ever. The next question is strictly
for the Mayors in the room. So, and this is an anonymous survey, so you can feel free to be honest. (Mayor Durkan laughs) Not that we’re not known for
our honesty already as Mayors. But simply, are you familiar,
or aware of the work that the U.S. Conference of Mayors Workforce Development Council does? And just in case you are
not, we’re gonna tell you. The Workforce Development Council is an affiliate organization. It’s under the umbrella of
the Conference of Mayors, and its members shape the
future of workforce development through dynamic and innovative approaches, solving the needs of both
businesses and workers. So you’ll find a flyer on your
tables with more information about how to have your voice represented on the Workforce Development Council. And we certainly recommend that you do so, because at a moment like
this, this body, we think, has the potential to have
a transformative influence on our workforce
development in our cities. It is also co-sponsoring the U.S. Conference of Mayors report entitled Technology and
the Future of Labor Force, which you should also find on your tables. This report, prepared by IHS Markit, is summarizing a lot of cutting
edge research on this topic. And I wanna thank Louisville
Mayor Greg Fischer, who chairs our Council on Metro Economies
and the New American Cities, for overseeing the
preparation of this report, and the conference’s
Workforce Development Council for co-sponsoring that work. A final question for this
morning for all participants. Do you know about, and
are you familiar with, your local workforce development
board’s strategic plan? Again, anonymous survey,
so we just wondered. Yeah, that sounds believable. Oh, it’s increasing there. Certainly strongly encourage that this is the time to
get involved with that, and a great moment where local leadership is gonna make a difference. We believe that residents
and the mayors who lead them can create a better future
through attention to these issues and through the kind of
dynamic problem-solving that is instinctive to every mayor. So first of all, a big thank
you to our panel once again, (audience applauds) Vikrum, Robert, Mayor Durkan. Thank you to our sponsors for
this morning’s discussion, McDonald’s Corporation, and the Conference of Mayors
Workforce Development Council for your support. And with that, we’re
gonna turn it back over to Mayor Benjamin to close us out. Thank you again. (audience applauds) – Thank you, Mayor Pete, and
these fantastic panelists. Before we adjourn, I do wanna
take a moment to announce the opening of the application process for the 2019 Childhood
Obesity Prevention Awards. By now, you, cities across the country
know about these awards, through the conference’s partnership with American Beverage
Foundation for a Healthy America. Since 2012, we’ve awarded
more than $3 million dollars in grants in cities across the country. In fact, our own city, in
2017, Columbia, South Carolina, received a grant of
$120,000 that we dedicated to gardening, nutrition,
and fitness programs that support our mayor’s
Youth Sports Initiative, to make all these things
fun for young people. It’s been fantastic. In 2019, we’re gonna
award another $445,000 to outstanding cities across America who are rolling out innovative programs to support the fight
against childhood obesity in innovative and impactful ways. You can apply online. I wanna encourage you to do so at www.usmayors.org/childhoodobesity. Applications are due on August 1st. Participate, participate, participate. Apply, get creative, let’s do this. The showcase, the beverage
industry’s innovation in bringing Americans more choices, smaller portions, and less sugar, the American Beverage
Association’s gonna host a beverage sampling booth tomorrow, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. I did say the American
Beverage Association, okay? So I don’t want you guys
showing up at the sampling booth looking for other things. (audience laughs) Swing by to enjoy a refreshing beverage, and learn more about the
latest initiatives from the ABA and our leading American
beverage companies. It’s gonna be, the booth is
gonna be on the 4th floor, out here in the atrium. See you all back here at 10:15 for our official opening plenary session. Before then, we’re gonna
have, from 9:15 to 9:45, there’ll be a bunch of
standing committee meetings, hopefully addressing
some of the policy issues that some of you may be
individually interested in. Breakfast is adjourned. Thank you all. (audience applauds) (“Attention” by Charlie Puth) ♪ I know that dress is
karma perfume regret ♪ ♪ You got me thinking ’bout
when you were mine ooh ♪ ♪ And now I’m all up
on ya what you expect ♪ ♪ But you’re not coming
home with me tonight ♪ ♪ You just want attention ♪ ♪ You don’t want my heart ♪ ♪ Maybe you just hate the
thought of me with someone new ♪ ♪ Yeah, you just want attention ♪ ♪ I knew from the ♪

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