ALC 2016: Alumni Association and Board of Directors Update

ALC 2016: Alumni Association and Board of Directors Update


NICOLAS CHAMMAS: Welcome
back from the break. It is my privilege, once again,
to introduce our Judy Cole, the Association’s
EVP and CEO, who will present the results
from last fiscal year. After Judy speaks, I will chair
the Alumni Association’s Board of Directors’ roadmap
for the year to come. Judy and I will present. And then, we will
take your questions. Judy, the floor is yours. [APPLAUSE] JUDY COLE: Thank you,
Nicolas, and good morning. I have to confess,
I feel somewhat at a great disadvantage after
following those first two presentations that
we had this morning. I thought they were
absolutely fabulous. I’m imagining that you
might have as well. It’s such a pleasure
to see all of you here today, as you’re are all
without no doubt MIT Alumni Community’s most
loyal advocates. ALC is one of my favorite
traditions at MIT because in bringing
you all together, it captures in one place
that intangible, undefinable, yet instantly recognizable
spirit of the MIT alumni. It echoes one of my other
favorite institute events. It’s actually my favorite
event at every institution I’ve worked at, which
is commencement. At Killian Court, we
witnessed the graduating class of men and women embark upon
their exciting and individual journeys as alumni. No doubt, you can all
still feel the energy of that moment yourselves. It is as if, for that day,
time collapses in on itself with MIT of the present
standing next to its past and its future. The pride of tradition, the
excitement and electricity of the days and years to come,
there is nothing quite like it. We, in the Alumni
Association, understand that it is our charge
to serve as stewards of these meaningful
milestones like commencement and of those profound
relationships you all share with one
another and with MIT. And we are so grateful
to have our dedicated Board of Directors and
our volunteer leaders, like all of you, as partners
in this important mission. That collaboration led to
a wonderful 2016 filled with so many high points. Perhaps the best way to begin
is to share that story with you by illustrating
it by the numbers. Let’s start with 134,344. As of June 30, that is the
number of living MIT alumni. To break that statistic
down just a little bit, 52% of that population is
graduate-degree-only alumni, and 48% of that population
is undergraduate alumni. So many alumni living and
leading across the globes correlates naturally to myriad
opportunities for engagement. To that end, the
Alumni Association hosted more than 1,360
events last year, and they were attended by
more than 51,000 individuals. This represented a 5%
increase over FY 2015. A great deal of
excitement was witnessed at Tech Reunions, where we
shattered previous attendance records by 570 people to
welcome nearly 4,500 individuals to campus. And last year’s ALC was
also a record-breaker at 670 people showing up
for that Fall gathering. The Association
made an investment in support of expanding
career resources and events. This year, we held two
inaugural Virtual Career Fairs, which drew nearly
2,200 registrants from 50 states and
51 countries to meet with participating employers. I also want to spotlight a
series of Cardinal and Gray and Emma Rogers Society combined
events across the country. This mini road show
served as a way to bring together these
important constituencies around topics that spoke
to their mutual interests. And the Banner
Celebration of the Year was the fantastic
MIT 2016, celebrating a century in Cambridge events,
as Marty Schmidt referenced. We were active participants
in the planning and execution of many of those events. From the Alumni Day of Service,
to The Moving Day Parade, to The Pageant on Killian Court,
and to my personal favorite, the fireworks extravaganza
during the Toast to Tech. It was indeed a
celebration worthy of an inspirational
moment in history. My favorite memory of
the Toast to Tech evening was after the toast
had been made, and the fireworks are
happening on the river, there was a student
worker who was staffing the event for
the Alumni Association on the stage with me. And we got to talking,
and it turned out that he was a
first-year student, and he wanted to learn more
about the Alumni Association. And he actually followed up. I didn’t have any
business cards. But he actually followed up
with me a few weeks later, and came over, and we
had a nice long chat. And it’s those kinds
of very personal one-on-one
conversations, I think, that really make such
a difference in some of those big events. Through these
activities and events, volunteers like all of
you played a central role. Our volunteer
numbers are strong, both with our longstanding
programs like clubs, classes, and groups, and with
new initiatives, such as the formation
of the MIT councils. I imagine many of
the club people here may have participated in
a council activity last year. These councils were
created at your request, at a request that
was made in an ALC several years ago
to share volunteer experiences and foster
lasting relationships. Convened by members of
the Alumni Association Board of Directors,
seven club councils each met twice last year
via teleconference and shared best practices,
discussed club reporting requirements, and
most importantly, build connections
among the club leaders. Another example of the value of
volunteers, the MIT Educational Council– many, many of our
best volunteers start as educational counselors– the Educational
Council increased the number of alumni
interviewers to 5,250. They conducted more
than 17,000 interviews. ECs include alumni from
the classes of 1941, all the way through
up to 2015, with 35% of the volunteers hailing from
the last decade of graduating classes. Moving over to fundraising,
I have another number to share with you. $75.7 million, that is
the total dollars raised by the MIT Annual Fund. What makes this statistic
even more significant is that we were celebrating the
Annual Fund’s 75th anniversary. 75 in 75, what a fabulous
way to honor that milestone. And what– [APPLAUSE] –and what some members of the
Annual Fund Goals Committee will recall, that was
actually our secret goal when we were setting the goals
for the fund for the year. We thought that would
be kind of cool, but nobody was confident
enough that we would actually achieve it to want
to put it in writing. So we made the
original goal was 70. Well, the original goal
was a little bit less, but then, it was 72.5, and we
exceeded that by $3.1 million. So that was really
quite exciting. There was a lot of celebration
after June 30, or early July. We can surely thank the nearly
44,700 alumni student, parent, and friend donors, who
made this fundraising achievement and a 9% increase
over FY 2015 a reality. I also want to
thank all of you who made peer-to-peer solicitations
and encouraged your classmates and friends to give back
to their Alma Mater. That makes all the difference. I want to give a special nod
to the Sloan School volunteers, who lead an initiative to
gain more than 5,000 donors and reach a higher than
ever participation rate. The MIT Sloan Global
Giving Challenge exceeded the goal of
27% participation, with more than 5,400
Sloanies coming together to reach 29% participation
and raise $4.6 million, including an extra $500,000
from their volunteer executive board chairs. Congratulations to the Sloan
volunteers in this audience. Many of our donors
chose to contribute through our newly launched
MIT giving website, which was a major collaborative
effort for many teams across advancement, but one that
will have substantial impact on our fundraising
efforts going forward– which will be very important
during our campaign, our public phase
of our campaign. To give you a sense
of volume produced by all of these efforts
collectively, in 2016, we completed more than
160,000 gift entries and record updates. This is also a record-high
number of transactions for the Office of Records. Back to the figures,
and to a simple number 1, that was the ranking of
the MIT Alumni Association’s Facebook and Twitter presences
among all of our IV Plus peer schools, in terms of the
proportion of our alumni, who are engaging with
MIT on social media. Related to that, the
Association’s slice of MIT blog recorded almost 600,000 unique
views, a nearly 20% increase from FY 15. Last year also saw the
onboarding development and rollout of a number
of new applications for mobile-based
event information, text-enabled giving, and
behaviorally-curated MIT news content. Encouraged by our board,
we are pleased to announce a new platform for
peer-to-peer interactions. You’ll find it at– it’s called Switchboard. You’ll find it at
switchboard.mit.edu, and here, you will be able to ask for what
you need and offer up what you can share– things like advice, jobs,
internships, rides, services, and more. The platform has relied on
many of you as early adopters, and now, we are ready for
you to share information about the new platform
with your peers. All of these wonderful
figures added up to one big tremendous 2016. And for all that each of you did
to make it a year to remember, we, in the Alumni Association,
offer you an equally tremendous thank you. Now that we have
covered looking back, it is time for us to turn
our focus ahead to our plans for making 2017 even greater. I would like to
turn the podium over to the President of the Alumni
Association, Nicolas Chammas. While Nicholas has
been at the podium several times so
far during ALC, he’s not been formally introduced. So first, a little
about Nicolas. He is the Chair of the LED
Chammas and Company holdings. He is the Vice-Chair
of Cedrus Bank, and the President of the
Beirut Traders Association, the oldest employers
organization in Lebanon. He earned his SM in civil
and environmental engineering at MIT, his MBA from the
Harvard Business School, and a Bachelor’s degree from the
American University of Beirut. He has served twice on
the Association board and been the Educational
Council’s Regional Chair for Arab countries
for more than a decade. He is the founder and First
Chair of the Enterprise Forum’s Pan-Arab Region Advisory Board. Please join me in welcoming
Nicholas Chammas back to the podium. [APPLAUSE] NICOLAS CHAMMAS: I
really have to apologize in advance for my
lengthy remarks, but there is so much going
on at the Association. So, Judy, thank you very
much for providing us with that snapshot of
the terrific successes of last year. As you’re AA Board
President, I am delighted to be
working with all of you to ensure that we build
upon this momentum to even greater effect
and success this year. I will be providing you
with the roadmap detailing how we intend to reach the next
level of growth during FY 17. But before we drill
down into this, I would like to just take
a moment and share with you how thrilled and humbled I am
to be your president today. As with all of you,
this institution, and its great community of
alumni, faculty, students, friends, leaders, staff,
innovators, and dreamers, we all had a game-changing
impact on our lives. It is my profound privilege
to have served as a volunteer, as Judy just said, in
service to the Institute for three decades. I am sure that you, like
me, take immense pride in knowing that in
our roles, we have been able to act as connectors,
bringing our fellow alumni together around these
commonalities and perspective. Or that you are proud
to serve as ambassadors of that spirit to those
beyond our internal community in the fields in
which we practice. I have said before that
my MIT experience is a gift that never stops giving. I live my life every day
fueled by the two key takeaways from that experience. The first, is to
never let yourself be caged in any
paradigm or situation and to always think
outside the box. And the second,
set ambitious goals and constantly raise the
bar for yourself and others. As I talk through what
the Board of Directors has set for our
priorities for FY 17, I ask each of you,
in this room today, to think about those priorities
in the context of those two takeaways. How can we, both individually
and collectively, approach the goals
designed to meet the needs of our community? I would like to introduce to you
the members of the Association Board of Directors,
who will share the journey with me this
year and support these goals. Association Board
Members, will you please stand to be recognized? [APPLAUSE] Well, I see that more than half
my board has almost vanished. They are overworked
and under-rested. We will refer them to Professor
[? Picard ?] later on. I, in particular, would like
to acknowledge the Board’s President-Select Hyun-A Park. [APPLAUSE] This year, Hyun-A
will be tapping into her outstanding
leadership skills to chair the program
committee, which is casting a special spotlight
on engaging our communities, alike parents and friends. Thank you, Hyun-A, for all you
will do this year and next when you take the baton from me. I also want to take the
opportunity to highlight, that for the first time ever, we
will be inviting two current– or we have invited actually,
two current students, the Undergraduate Association
President, Sophia Liu, and the Graduate Student Council
President, Arolyn Conwell, to join our board meetings
on an experimental basis. We have done that
for two reasons. The first one is inclusiveness
because at the level of the Alumni Association,
we like to keep our doors and windows open. And we have experienced how
valuable the imput of the MIT 10 cohort is to our discussions
and to the work of the Board. So we have decided to go
upstream to the students’ level and have them with
us participate in the works of the Board And we think that it is
extremely important for us to know what is on their
minds, and at the same time, for them to know
what is going on at the level of the
association because they are the alumni of the future. The second reason is the
one of indeed alignment because there are several
constituencies within MIT, the students, the faculty, the
administration, the alumni, and the friends and parents. It is important that we
all are on the same page. And by the same
token, we have invited high-ranking Institute
Representative, Vice President Kirk Kolenbrander into the
meetings going forward. We believe that the inclusion
of these three new voices and perspectives can
only enrich our process as we, on the board,
tackle the priorities we have set before us this year. Now what are those priorities? The first charge
we have put forth is one that addresses
a significant portion of our alumni population, whom
perhaps have not been engaged as deliberately in the past. How do we increase graduate
student and graduate alumni participation in MIT and MIT
Alumni Association programming? Here’s the thing,
anecdotally, and then empirically, we have discovered
that godwit alumni have very favorable feelings about
the experience they had at MIT. And also, they are
very present as far as the demography as
alumni is concerned because they now constitute
52% of the alumni population. This is on one hand– on the other hand, they
are much less engaged than undergraduate alumni. So we wanted to understand
why we had this gap. And in order to do so, we
have taken two initiatives that I will be announcing here. The first one is the
establishment of a Graduate Alumni Council, or
GAC, which could be viewed as a thematic parallel
to the famous GSC, the Graduate Student Council. So through its work with GSC,
the MIT Alumni Association hopes to divine
the discrete needs and wants of this
population, while also hoping to discover those nexus points
where the experience meet, all in an attempt
to build a better, more targeted programming at the
level of the graduate students. So in its founding
chair, Harry Ready– is Harry here? Where is he? Please stand up. And Vice Chair, John Wilkins. Is John here? Please– [APPLAUSE] We have found two dedicated,
enthusiastic alumni to lead this important work. So we greatly count
on you Harry and John. The second related priority
will run simultaneously, but in support of GSC, and that
is a one-year graduate alumni working group to study the
graduate student experience, really from the
cellar to the attic– so that we know exactly
what is going on. And this effort
will be led by one of our most-seasoned
volunteers, Mr. Steve Baker. Steve? [APPLAUSE] I suppose a helpful way
of looking at this group is that they will serve in a
consultative role with both GSC and the Alumni Association by
collecting data and thoughts from around graduate and
undergraduate students that would inform the mission and
initiatives of GSC in the years to come. So it is our hope that
through these graduate alumni and student-focused
priorities, we are able to understand this
large, diverse consistency a little better and create
for them the programs that speak to them authentically. As you may imagine,
having this information is not only germane
to our mission, but also to the work
of the Institute. Our next priority
should also go far in terms of reintroducing
the MIT experience into the lives of both graduate
and undergraduate alumni, by meeting them where
they live, so to speak. So as you all know, the MIT
Campaign for a Better World was launched as not only a
capital investment, but also as an investment in the
life-changing global-reaching innovation and progress
endeavored by our students, faculty, and future alumni. With a goal as
ambitious as to create a better world, and at $5
billion campaign goal nearly as ambitious– MIT will be traveling around the
world over the next two years to showcase just
what we have done, and what we are going to do to
make a better world a reality. So starting in
October, MIT will be launching a multi-city
International Campaign Roadshow, in which MIT will be
popping up in your backyard. The roadshow will move from
New York, to San Francisco, to Hong Kong in
the Fall semester– then in the spring,
in London and Israel, before returning back to the
States in Southern California, then on to Mexico City,
and ending this year in Washington DC. And this is just in year 1. As the Better World
message circles the globe, our alumni are obviously
a critical part of that narrative. We provide, in essence,
the substantiating proof of how the MIT community
is ushering in this better world to which we aspire. The biggest way in which you can
support the campaign roadshow beyond contributing to the
campaign itself, of course, is your attendance. And if you are
unable to attend, we invite you to continue your
roles as our community’s greatest ambassadors,
by spreading the word to your classmates
and fellow alumni who make their homes and
living in one of the cities that we mentioned. If MIT comes to
your city, we want to see there, the room,
a sea of brass rats, lighting up the room
like glinting beacons. [LAUGHTER] Thank you for the speech writer. As I mentioned earlier,
all of these priorities are serving as signposts for
the world’s roadmap this year. But just like our
connections to our Alma Mater and to one another, there is no
finite endpoint to our journey. There will be always more to
go, new avenues to travel down, new groups to discover, and
vistas of new connections within our alumni community. And so our last
priority is to develop a long-range strategic
plan for this board. We have to be looking, not
just at year-to-year goals, but rather at the
grander landscape from the highest
possible altitude. We want to be thinking about
what our community will look like in five, 10, even 20 years,
and to map out commensurate, coherent objectives and goals
that will support that growth. In other words, we
need to be talking about the long-term game here. I am pleased to report
that we are already off to a great start, thanks
to the efforts of board member Jennifer Yang. Is Jennifer here? She is not here. OK– who is leading this charge. I would like just to recognize
her and say that she has been doing an admirable work. [APPLAUSE] This summer, Jennifer
connected with Judy Cole and her senior team to begin
the collaborative work that will inform the strategic roadmap. I’m confident that
by working together, the board plus the staff,
each of us bringing our talents to bear, we will
develop an aspirational, yet implementable plan that will
bring us even greater advances to come. I leave you all
with final thought to carry with you today,
and as you move forward in your chosen roles
as MIT volunteers. I have stated that my objective
as president this year is to extend and amplify my
predecessors’ trajectory. Are they here? I see John here, John Chisel– [APPLAUSE] –and Don Shobrys, who is,
I know, in St. Louis today. Don is the past-past president. I also would like to
recognize him today. [APPLAUSE] The work that we
do together, now only honors the commitment
of those who came before us, and who toiled tirelessly
to bring MIT students alumni to where we are today. We owe it to them
and to all of those who will come after us
to only soar even higher. Thank you very much. [APPLAUSE] We will now take your questions. JUDY COLE: Can you wait
for the mic please? NICOLAS CHAMMAS:
The mic is coming. AUDIENCE: I graduated
in Management, so I was unable to do
the math in real time, but I think I saw 13,065
events with 51,000 attendees. Is that about 40
people per event? And why so low? And would you like some help? JUDY COLE: I don’t
think that that– I don’t think it was– it doesn’t calculate
out quite that way. Some of the events were very
large, some were very small, and that’s by design
because you want to have some events that
are large networking events. And you want others that are
much smaller, more intimate, and more intense or deeper
dives into a subject. But I guess, on average
that would be accurate. NICOLAS CHAMMAS:
Maybe the median would have shown a
different peak [INAUDIBLE]. [LAUGHTER] JUDY COLE: Indeed, I
don’t know what that is off the top of my head, sorry. [LAUGHTER] Up there, Meredith. AUDIENCE: Thank
you for updating us on sharing what activities
have been developing. I’m wondering, as
alumni, how we’re doing in terms of
engagement of our alums who aren’t in those numbers, in
terms of reaching out and being creative– ways of doing that? I know during the ALC,
we have the sessions about what we do have the
meetings among the various alum leadership– of new ideas and how
to implement those. But I’m wondering as the
Association, how good a job we’re doing at assessing how
successful we are at reaching out, and how we
are engaging those who may not have been here
or been a part of the alumni activity. Even if they don’t come to the
gatherings, I know globally, we have events in our
regions and those areas. But how actively are we finding
creative ways of engagement? I know some of the
technologies that we’re using and things like that,
but just wondering how you’re seeing that
from the assessment of how we’re going from year to year. JUDY COLE: So we
track engagement in multiple different ways. We track philanthropic
engagement, we track the
face-to-face engagement, and we track the
virtual engagement. And there are obviously
overlapping parts of those different
circles, but overall, if you looked at the
outline of the Venn diagram, we are engaging roughly
48% of our alumni. How does that compare
to other people? I can’t give you a crisp
answer there because I don’t know of any
peer schools that are counting things or tracking
things in the same way. The closest I can come is
there’s one other school here in Boston, which is
not on the river, that I know does
something similar. And their overall
engagement was 25%. So I am not unhappy
with 48%, but I also believe that we
can do much better. And so we’ve developed a
number of different ways that we strive to
reach out to people. And these are all ways that
you all can help us with. The apps that I mentioned
in the presentation are one way because those
actually are trackable for us. Most of those are
trackable for us. And so if somebody goes on to
one of the apps, Switchboard or the Events app
that many of you may have downloaded for
this event, or for reunions, things like that– those automatically get fed
into the database, and we know. And that can expand
our unique alumni. For the staff, the
metrics that we use are tracking participation in
individual events and programs, based on how many
new people came, how many people were renewed
from previous engagement, and how many were reactivated
where they had lapsed from their engagement with the
Institute for several years. So that’s helping us to
remain aware of whether or not we are reaching out into
the parts of the alumni population that may not have
been engaged with us recently. NICOLAS CHAMMAS: I think
that this is a great question because engagement
is our obsession, as Judy just pointed out. If you just take a look at the
rendering here of the three circles that she just mentioned,
this is a great rendering. And by the way, it is
not drawn to any scale. The small circle is
the philanthropy. The one in the
middle is in person, and the big one is the virtual. So our obsession is to increase
the size of the circles, obviously. The philanthropy is the one
that keeps us on our toes because the long-time trend has
been really a decline from like 50% participation
rate in the ’80s– now, we around 28 or 29%. So this is a real worry
in terms of participation, not of dollars, but in
terms of participation. As for the others,
your presence here is a testament to how important
the in-person meetings are, and we have to give credit
to the clubs internationally and locally for enhancing
this face-to-face interaction. As for the big circle,
I think that our staff is doing a tremendous work, in
terms of developing instruments and applications
that keep the Alumni Association at large engaged. AUDIENCE: Do you have numbers
on the current students and the students, say the first
five years out of graduation? It seems like, for
any organization, if you capture that
group early, they continue throughout a
lifetime, while those who might join much later
are less likely to do so. And so it seems like one
of your major efforts should be to ask the
graduating class, and I’m almost certain
you do, to make a pledge and join the Association
when they get their diploma. JUDY COLE: We do. We have a comprehensive
student philanthropy program. We have an undergraduate
campaign that begins and covers the Freshmen, the
first-year, second, and third-year students. And we also have an extremely
successful senior gift campaign. This year, it set a new
record, another record, for the 11th year in a row, and
it’s now at 88.7% participation rate among the senior class. We also track quite actively
not the first five years, but actually, we
call it MIT 10, which is our undergraduate, alumni,
and first 10 years after they graduated. And they have a participation
rate in philanthropy that hovers around 31%. And that is the envy
of our ivy peers. NICOLAS CHAMMAS: To move away
a little bit from philanthropy, and in order to enhance the
other forms of engagement, we have been thinking of
on-boarding the future alumni as students, not even a t equals
zero, but at t equal minus 1 in their local communities. This is extremely
important, sir, because what interests us
is not only philanthropy, but the sweet spot that is drawn
and the colored in red here. This is what the
bull’s eye for us. And early involvement
is extremely important. And we have noticed
that the cohort, what we call between 11 and 25– this is the time in one’s
life when you are establishing yourself and so on. So they get a little
bit disinterested. This is where we have
to redouble our efforts to keep them anchored to MIT. JUDY COLE: One other thing I
should mention because it’s not only undergraduate students that
we work with, we also have– we do not yet have the
philanthropy programs for the graduate students. But last year, we
initiated a new program where we did once a month what
we called “a taste of” dinner. So it would be a taste of
India, a taste of South America, a taste of wherever–
and we had over 1,000 unique graduate
students attend those events. And we were pleased with
that, so of course, we’re sustaining it again. And it’s open to
the whole community. Some of them may have
attended more than one, but– other questions? AUDIENCE: Thank you for
[INAUDIBLE] presentation. I have a question. What has been the
experience to engage faraway clubs or overseas? There’s something that’s
called the inverse distance factor, meaning, here
in Cambridge if you say to someone, I went to
MIT, they say oh, cool. If you said that
in Buenos Aires, or if you say that in
Kathmandu, they would say wow. [LAUGHTER] My question is, has there
been any specific experience on reaching out to faraway
places, clubs, and communities? JUDY COLE: So let me see– you’re asking how
are we reaching out to the faraway communities? Well, my travel schedule
would tell that tale somewhat. And I think the President’s
travel schedule would as well. We tend to focus more on
the larger concentrations of alumni, naturally,
because you’re going to be able to reach
more people that way. But the President is on the
road almost all the time. I’m on the road often, but
not quite as much as he is. And there are many
different areas where we’re trying
to reach out to them. The virtual programs
are also a way of reaching those communities. So another program that
I didn’t mention earlier, we have two online programs. One is called
Faculty Forum Online, and the other is called Faculty
Forum Online, Alumni Edition. Faculty Forum Online is where I
or another member of the staff will interview a faculty
member for 45 minutes during the lunch hour about
their research and their work. And you have to register, but
the alumni can ask questions. And then, they’re fed to
me through a computer, and I ask the questions
of the faculty member. That can be accessed
from anywhere, even if there’s no club there. And the Faculty Form Online is
an effort to engage our alumni, who are academics at other
institutions and invite them around a specific topic– or
maybe it’s a cross-disciplinary topic– to have a conversation
among themselves. And again, the alumni
can ask questions. And those have both been
very successful programs, and they continue this year. NICOLAS CHAMMAS: You are
making a very interesting point because there seems to be
a disproportional relation. Most graduates, when they are
here, they live off campus. Most undergrads or
undergrads live on campus. The feelings are better for
those who lived off campus. Same thing as far as the
country is concerned. The farther you go, the
stronger the MIT brand is. And we found that
there is a correlation between graduate
and international because most international
are graduates. And this is one
of the hypotheses that the group of Steve is
testing for the years to come– how to try to improve this. But believe me, MIT is
extremely well present in those foreign countries. You have the number of clubs
is almost equal to the one that is present domestically. And they are extremely active. Anyway, the message is
the same across the board. And I would maybe
end by recapturing the message of President
Reif, who said basically that the MIT community
is active on two levels. On a macro level, we are working
to make the world a better place, and on a micro level,
at the level of each individual by preserving the physical,
emotional, and intellectual well-being of everyone of us. This is our mission,
these are our message in Boston or in Buenos Aires. [APPLAUSE] Thank you very much.

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