Best Practices for Recruiting Women into the Federal Government

Best Practices for Recruiting Women into the Federal Government


>>Good afternoon. I’m Kimberley Holden, Deputy
Associate Director, at OPM’s Recruitment and Hiring.>>Today, we are having our webcast and we
would like to welcome you. Affect is practices for recruiting and hiring women in stem occupations.
This is the first of a series of practices across the country in OPM’s strategy in pay
inequality and the federal government. On May 10 am a 2013, president Obama signed a
memorandum directing OPM to develop a governmentwide strategy to address gender pay gaps in the
federal workforce to include an analysis of the GS classification system, providing guidance
for greater salary transparency and recommendations for additional actions or proposals or studies.
OPM presented its results of that analysis in April of 2014. In a report, the government
watch strategy on advancing pay equality of the federal government, which is posted on
OPM’s website. Many of you attended in which OPM presented highlights of that report. Today’s
session is one of those from the five recommendations under the category additional administrative
or legislative actions or studies. Therefore, this webcast is just one way in which we are
looking to share best practices and develop recruitment and outreach strategies for growing
female populations in occupations where we are underrepresented, including science, technology,
engineering and mathematics, or stem, and other nontraditional jobs as well as supervisory
and managerial positions. Today, our objective is to share effective practices and recruitment
and outreach strategies for growing female populations in occupations where we are underrepresented
Hummel which include stem and leadership positions. Today’s presentation begins with opening remarks
from Dr. Janie B Morrow, Executive Director for the national science and technology Council
at the White House’s office of science and technology policy. The presentation and her
opening remarks will be followed by a presentation by Ms. Natalie size, HR her for the NASA Johnson
space Center and followed by Kimberly English, the recruitment manager for the nuclear regulatory
commission. Our speakers will address topics as relates to their agency’s current practices
and recent successes. If you have any questions for any of our speakers during this presentation,
please feel free to e-mail them to outreach at OPM.gov, and we will include them in our
Q&A session at the end of the presentation. At this time, I would like to introduce Dr.
Janie Morrow. Dr. Morrow serves as the executive director for the national science technology
Council at the White House office of science technology policy. Where she leads the coordination
efforts to create and implement a strategic vision for the development of the federal
stem workforce and remote interagency efforts for the advancement and knowledge — to advance
our knowledge and understanding of how to sustain, shape, and enhance a world-class
stem workforce. As an environmental engineer at the national Institute of standards and
technology, the auctor Morrow was honored with the presidential early career award for
scientists and engineers for her 20 years of pioneering research on the copper niece
of microbial systems, in particular the characterization of bacterial surface interactions and the
fate and transport of microbial pathogens and environmental matrices, and for her commitment
to the next generation of young scientists through summer undergraduate internship programs,
so Janie, welcome.>>Thank you for that fantastic introduction
and thank you so much for the opportunity to come and introduce the sightless speakers,
which I’m looking forward to hearing more about their work. I just wanted to hold up
some of the opportunity we have here for dialogue regarding how to enhance the quality, flow,
and diversity of the federal stem workforce. And talk just briefly about some of our efforts
to improve upon activities in engaging women and girls in stem. When we look at some of
the challenges for balancing the rules and responsibilities that our federal stem workforce
engages in every day, we look at opportunities to work with our partners at OPM, the human
resource professionals in the agencies, the stem professionals in the agencies, and the
Chico Council to guide our activities and engagement and discussion and dialogue. We
are looking at opportunities to enhance the flow across sectors for both the federal government
industry and academia so that stem professionals can engage in questions and dynamic challenges
of the course of their career that enable problem solution and engagement. Our stem
community and highlighting the world-class workforce we have in the federal government,
and to enable the federal government to compete for the highest quality stem professionals
and continue to advance our world-class stem professional activities. When we have looked
at opportunities and some of the unique challenges faced by women and girls, we’ve looked at
opportunities to enhance teaching and classroom experiences and we look at opportunities to
better message the power of opportunities for stem careers and reducing the structural
barriers to enhance work-life balance and discuss the balance him plus it and explicit
that once we address them will help empower women and girls with more opportunities for
enhanced, innovative, and problem-solving careers in the future. We also look at opportunities
to engage with women who have left the stem workforce and empower them to return to the
federal workforce as well as our industry and academic sectors. It is with pleasure
I get to hear the talks with our colleagues and listen to their innovative ideas and how
they are working to help improve upon the hiring and recruitment practices and share
what they have learned over the years at engaging and supporting women and girls in stem. So
thank you.>>Now, I have the leisure of introducing
our first speaker. I would like to welcome Natalie. She brings her 28 years of experience
with NASA, 10 of which she has served as the Director of human resources at the Johnson
space Center. Where she has strategically managed the HR office to provide support and
align the goals with the human research team of civil servants and contractors. She and
her team strive to facilitate an inclusive and creative work lace. Throughout her career,
she has earned numerous honors and awards, including the San Diego Rodriguez diversity
award presented by great minds in stem in 2007 and HR Magazine’s HR executive of the
year in 2009. Her many career highlights include the development and implementation of a former
mentoring program at the Johnson space Center, your opportunity to develop another. She initiated
the program project management program to develop future program level project management
for long-term challenges and this is agencywide participation. She also included the office
at the Johnson space Center to build a diversity — a diverse and inclusive culture that builds
open-mindedness and creativity. She led the workforce transition after the shuttle retirement
and the Johnson space Center’s mission. She received her bachelor scrutiny a restatement
ago and her Masters from the University of Houston clear Lake’s. Welcome.>>Thank you very much. It is a pleasure and
honor to be here today. I want to share what we have been doing an asset to recruit women
in stem. I’ll start with a couple of charts to give you some background on our mission
and what we focus on. We have four different mission directorates — we have the aeronautics
research, science, human expiration and space technology. One of the first things I want
to point out is we try to get our word out about what our mission, we have multiple missions,
what they are, and next site girls into stem fields. A little bit of background. We have
10 different field centers. We have NASA headquarters here in Washington DC where we receive guidance
and direction from the agency under our current administrator, Charlie Bolden. We have 10
field centers that are working on the day to day work where people are working in laboratories,
airfields, windtunnel — this gives you a picture of where we are located geographically
and as you can see, we are spread across the entire United States. A little bit about our
positions. We have scientific positions, 24% administrative and management. These are folks
like our procurement folks, public affairs, various activities that would be under the
administrative and management functions. Some technicians and medical officers around the
agency and then you can see the other two as well. This gives you the break down of
where we are. As far as the numbers, we have about 17,500 civil servants employees. Almost
35% are women. Of those, 42% are in stem focus field. We went through an astronaut selection
process where we selected a new astronauts, four of which are women. You can see them
on the screen there on the far left-hand corner, so we are very excited about that as well.
A little bit of background. Compared to the early days of NASA, women have been moving
up into various leadership as Asians. One key position as the flight director position.
This is a person in charge of the overall mission, as those are happening and this is
the historic mission control center from the 1960’s. We have our female flight directors
as well, so that’s a nice comparison and contrast there. Little bit about trying to support
women in the workplace — we are finding this is not only for women but we are trying to
emphasize using flexible work schedules. It has been a big initiative across federal government
looking at work-life balance programs. Some of the things we have here is a childcare
center with wellness programs and gym facilities and things like that. We have a big effort
for worksite lactation projects and programs like that. As we go out recruiting and talking
to individual folks, a lot of people want to know what you are doing and work lace.
These are some of the things we highlight. We have a brochure called life on earth, which
is a catalog of all the different activities we have. We’re finding a lot of folks are
interested in those programs before they even come to work. They want to know how progress
of your revisitation is and what kind of services are provided. That’s something we’ve had to
focus on. One of the things we try to do is cast a net nationwide as much as we can. We
can only go to Sony schools and universities physically but we do attend career fairs and
school visits and agencies on certain events. We are doing a lot more and the virtual field
and having career fairs and web casts such as this right now. We can really casts that
net a lot lighter and a lot more people can participate in one event where we have people
that we open up to various schools and universities — this is just one snapshot of one event
we had. We are utilizing social media a lot more. Something that’s very important is our
relationship with our education office. It’s important to maintain those relationships
with the universities and colleges. What do we do as far as trying to recruit women to
NASA? Trying to reach out through the K-12 stem program for women and girls, that is
something we partner closely with with our education office, trying to get roles interested
in stem fields, trying to showcase women in stem as well. These are a couple of snapshots
of our recruiting materials featuring an astronaut who was a pathways in turn. We use her photo
on our recruiting materials to show young girls how they can achieve goals such as Karen’s,
which is meaningful for people. We try to participate in volunteering to be panel members
at the Society for women engineers will stop we try to support their conference and career
fairs and things like that. We also try to use our internship or grams as much as possible
and education interns. So they can pursue stem fields as well. When you focus on the
K-12 and internship, eventually you are trying to develop that pipeline that hits through
the K-12 program and then finally pathways and hopefully a permanent job offer. One of
the things we do as a result of the Executive Order passed on March 11 20 — 2009 as we
indicated from the White House Council of women and girls, it was established then — we
did a video and a website at NASA where we focused on women and girls and we have 64
videos and essays from across the agency. This has both stem and non-stem who contribute
to NASA upon mission. We have this available that we have showcased and we have another
website I will come back to that focuses specifically on NASA women in stem. This is open to everybody.
We still — we tell some stories about women making contributions to try to inspire younger
girls. We do both of these going back to this one here. This is something that gained a
lot of popularity. It’s the importance of having role models and sharing stories on
how women have an successful. This will be available to look through after the presentation
is over. What we try to do here is as I indicated earlier, trying to have the student intern
pipeline looking at the pipeline as I mentioned reaching out to the female student organizations
are to visiting campuses is very important as well. Trying to send role models out to
recruiting events is also helpful to get people to be the information has a diverse individuals
actually being showcased. One of the things we try to focus on is one of the student benefits
and these are just some of the benefits gaining work experience and mentorship. They’re getting
a realistic experience of what the job is about and developing the leadership skills,
developing a broader perspective of the work lace, how can they contribute to the space
program and how can they secure full-time employment with NASA? At the same time, national
benefits and we are training few shall — future employees. Even if students did not end up
working for NASA, we believe we are contribute into the larger stem initiative, having folks
in stem fields is very important not only for NASA and other better latencies as well.
We look at having worked worse that are important, really getting that exposure to at the technical
work is all about. To really gain exposure to at the stem fields are about. The other
thing we try to do is once we actually recruit young students into our programs, we are looking
at what do we do for on boarding. With it’s really important one sweet yet here. We’re
making sure they have challenging and meaningful work, making sure they have a strong mentor
so they can understand what’s expected of them and what are some ways to navigate that
organizational culture as well. Student led activities, there’s a tour’s and lectures
committee that focuses on connecting the mission and various missions to the individual sites
and different students to see where do they fit depending on what their academic suits
are. We have a housing committee coming from all over the nation to different laces here
mapping out all the different NASA facilities. We helped them secure housing as well because
often times — there is outrage and I have charts that will talk about the other two.
This is the example — just different labs and sites they’ve seen that they have become
exposed to. This is the one I want to talk about — some of the outside activities they
are involved as well. Doing some community outreach. Softball teams and basketball teams
and other different events they can try to the old that community as well and then just
doing some student videos that help with recruiting as well. We have a link that shows videos
are student interns have put together to try to recruit more participation in stem, so
we will add that as well. These are some of the websites I referenced in the presentation
I just made. I will add a couple of more so if you want information, you can pursue those
different websites. So I will turn it over to you. Thank you very much for your time.>>Hopefully the agencies will be able to
glean a lot of best practices. Now I’m pleased to present our next speaker, Timberlane English,
their recruitment manager from the chief human capital office at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
As they recruitment program manager, she assists in the implementation of the outreach and
initiatives designed to secure and highly qualified workforce to meet the future agency
challenges. She manages the recruitment event schedule as well as provides support with
the agencies internal communication. She joined the NRC in 2008 after working for the department
of Health and Human Services for seven years. She received her bachelors degree in business
administration from Marymount University. So welcome.>>Thank you. The NRC is looking for the
right people, meeting people at share our
values and believe in the mission and share our values for the right place at the right
time. These are important to any business, public and private to meet business objectives.
I want to discuss how the NRC tackles recruitment. The recruitment focuses primarily technical,
but we have some administrative and support positions. We focus on engineers and the civil
criticality. We look for those with physical gold material science, health am a physics,
and corporate support of accounting finance, security specialists, I.T. and cyber security,
just to give you an idea of who we recruit. Back in 2004, the NRC had read thousand 109
employees of wish 1851 were in stem disciplines. The workforce was 18% female. Currently, the
NRC workforce is staffed with 3700 employees. 22% are females and had a slight increase
in women over the last 10 years. Many of the hires are replacements due to the low attrition
rate of around four percent. That does not allow us the opportunity to expand in stem.
Due to the limited growth, ways we were trying to increase diversity and the number of females
in stem is through the summer hire program. We use the program as a feeder into the nuclear
development or Graham, the prayer intern program for recent grads. The program is entry level
and is a full-time career latter position. For the 2014 program, we received 1387 unique
applications of which 689 made the best qualified list. Almost arty percent of the best qualified
were female. We have made all final decisions and 36% of the selectees are female. Challenges
to recruiting women in stem. A Department of commerce report in 2011 said one in seven
engineers is female. At the time, there were no growth and females in stem since 2000.
Our challenges recruiting women in stem are similar to the challenges we face with recruiting
other diverse groups. U.S. citizenship is required, so we run into situations where
people are very interested in working for the NRC but they are not U.S. citizens. It
is commonly known mend — men and to dominate these fields and role models for females are
in the medical field or law and not science, technology or engineering. Pop culture shows
are nominally male characters in movies, but we are seeing a slow shift that shows shows
like bones were the main character is a forensic psychologist or shows like big bang theory
where you have women who are microbiologists. We have unconscious barriers where managers
hire individuals like themselves that went to the same school they attend or have similar
backgrounds. We are seeing where it even though there is a diverse next and the qualified
applicant pool, men are selected over women. Our employer branding activities include advertisements
that we run in print locations and on the Internet. We run ads and talk about the NRC
is a great place to work and talk about specific jobs at the time it was released. We run ads
or post jobs where there are targeted outreach like diversity for careers in technology,
professional women’s magazines, lack equal opportunity employment Journal, the national
Society of Black engineers, the Society of professional engineers, the Society of women
engineers, we also outreach to veterans and post jobs electronically. We also post jobs
and place ads with equal opportunity employment. We are special outreach activities used to
target specific vacancies. For example, the chief financial officer or director of the
office of Congressional affairs is I sent out e-mails to diverse associations — the
African-American federal executives Association that predominately had executives that would
fill that particular need. We provided them with any e-mail and ask them to post to the
vacancy with the roll call and to hell. We attract talent through academic linkages that
take the form of campus raised activities. The sessions expose students to the mission
and what we are like as an employer. NRC attends about 60 career events a year will stop most
our college career events but we do professional meetings where there’s a career fair included
with the Expo. Some college fairs are cosponsored by campuses like the University of Michigan
and we attend the fair on the SMT campus and the annual Society of women’s engineers conference
Expo. We have a number of programs we administer for scholarships, fellowships, faculty development
grants and these coupled with the agencies Small Business and civil rights office grants
focus on minority serving Institute and helped to continue to feed the I plan for the future
nuclear force. We integrate diversity about reaching recruitment and we anticipate career
week activities at elementary, middle and high school. For our K-12 outreach, the and
RC headquarters conducts a variety of activities. I will give you an example of what region
three out of Illinois does. Our activities are volunteer-based. The staff act as role
models to stem topics. The staff identify opportunities for interaction, whether a career
fair, judging a science fair, tending science fairs — attending science fairs and classroom
visits. The
activities are — can be generic in nature or focus on the NRC and chat with counselors
and teachers to educate them and advocate for stem. They are not aware of engineering
field as much as science fields, so these are a when/when. The regional office works
in conjunction with Argonne national labs on activities like introduced a girl to engineering
Day called during national entering week. Science careers in search of women where they
have a booth and participate as panel speakers. The percentage of women in engineering is
about 10%. If you can’t get them interested by middle school or elementary school, you
will not get them to be interested at all. These investments can be easily done along
with regular recruitment activities. The NRC has a champions program comprised of NRC staff
volunteers who serve as emissaries and build close relationships with school officials.
The champions meet with engineering and science department heads, professors, and career counselors
to discuss agency priorities, funding opportunities through grants and promoting NRC as an employer
of choice. The University champions attend career fairs and create awareness about current
resources in the industry. It’s identified by the outreach and recruitment branch based
on a variety of factors including skill curriculum, past successes at the school and the school’s
demographic makeup. Currently, there are 68 University champions and cochampions of which
22 are women which relate to the efforts of establishing role models as mentioned earlier.
I will give you an example of a success story. The university champion at the Florida State
combined program. Greg has a background in physics and emergency preparedness. His cochampions
was a participant in the NSA PD program and has a act ground waste and environmental protection.
The University champion felt some are hires were not being appropriately used and assigned
special progress and work they could take active school. This led to the project included
in their curriculum, and those professors are willing to sponsor and mentor the students.
In the five years and simple mending this approach, students are making valuable contributions.
Several of the students were accepted into the program. There is a heightened awareness
where they attend career fairs will stop there helping to spare the word about the positive
experiences they’ve had at the agency. This is just one experience of how we feed the
pipeline Fort nuclear safety professional appearances. Try to evaluate our efforts,
which is not the easiest thing to do, we have added a question to the vacancy posted on
USA jobs in hopes we could see some kind of interest in our marketing efforts to make
sure they are actually working. We had to show the difference between posting a job
versus job posting on another job board. What we do is look at the diversity of the applicant
pool so we can see how well we are doing on diversity which will help with the yearly
recruitment advocacy. We continue to enhance our University program and improve our retention
efforts. We are currently in the process of refreshing recruitment materials. Thank you
very much. Cracks thank you, Kimberly. It’s time for questions. We have time set aside
for Q&A. If you have questions based on the presentations from Kimberly and Natalie, please
send them to outreach at OPM.gov. Do we have a questions?>>First question is what do you find are
among the top three challenges facing federal agencies with regard to recruiting women and
girls and to stem positions? What are the top three challenges with regard to recruiting
women and girls?>>I will take one of them, if that’s OK.
One of the challenges we have is just encouraging young girls to pursue math and science early
on. Some of the information I have read or I have seen the idea that young girls are
not good at math and steer into other fields, I think that impacts our ability to try to
find talent and I think it’s becoming more and more difficult. I applaud all of the efforts
every agency does to really try to encourage him girls to pursue math and science. To me,
it’s about that applicant pool. It’s getting them while they are younger and getting them
interested. Predominately, those who come by the boos are male students, so it is getting
the outreach out there through the younger K-12 and getting them interested and involved
in activities, which will hopefully catch on and they will hopefully go into a career
in science, technology and math all stop>>A secondary concern is the lack of role
models. I think that’s why it’s important to showcase some of the successful women in
various occupations. It’s important and also for students to see people like them at recruiting
events.>>The second question is how can agencies
best prepare recruitment teams to deal with unique issues related to stem recruitment,
particularly in regard to women and girls question mark how can agencies prepare recruitment
teams relate to stem recruitment, articulate in regard to attracting women and girls?>>I would suggest the agencies just get their
younger employees , having to go out and do the presentations at the schools, attend career
fairs so students can see them at the booth and talk about what they do. That seems to
be what we do at the NRC.>>You are absolutely right. It is important
to have information on what the worksite is actually like. What are the different benefits
and services offered there? Some of the examples I use, for example, being able to get involved
with the community, different sporting activities and events in that whole idea of making connections
and the whole idea of community is important.>>The third question — can you suggest strategies
recruiters can use out in the field Lovering things like information sessions, job or career
fairs when trying to attract women and girls to consider — what can they use why are out
there recruiting?>>One strategy I think is very important
that is often successful is trying to ask Lane the agency’s mission and really focusing
on the importance of that mission and how individuals can make contributions. It’s very
important for people to understand the value they would ring, what are they working on,
how is it important? Students want to know they are making a difference, so focusing
on the mission is extremely important. I think that’s done through one-on-one and it’s important
for people to have one-on-one conversations and make those connections is what I would
say.>>I agree. Getting staff involved in high
schools and elementary schools, having them showcase the agencies mission and what they
do and ring models or interactive activities, that is the best way to go.>>Someone had a question about retention
rates. What are your retention rates?>>I don’t have the specific information at
NASA. I do know that it varies across each of the centers but our attrition rate is about
4% or four point five percent. I don’t have a broken down by women or other demographics
at this point.>>Same goes with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
I don’t have the breakdown and retention rate but the attrition is 4%.>>Do you feel federal agencies can do a better
job renting the federal government as a primary employee or People’s stem positions in general
or women and girls in particular? What are some of the ways we can do that?>>It goes back again to the importance of
the various agencies. Each one has its unique purpose and ability to explain how they are
impacting the overall United States and what it means and what they are doing. I’m seeing
the next generation is really focused on what kind of impact they’re going to have day-to-day
and how can they make contributions? In the past, as you start off with a job and you
don’t necessarily think about your own career, I think I’ve seen that shift about what are
those long-standing impacts. I think branding has an opportunity to do some good branding
work. It does take a lot of energy and creativity. But I do think with a very limited amount
of money, that can be done very well. Bringing a diverse set of people together to talk about
what is our brand for this agency and talk about that as much as possible.>>I agree. It’s all about educating the public.
Anyway we can do that to get it out there, working in the federal government and what
it’s like, that’s very important.>>Someone asked what type of metrics do you
have regarding recruitment of women’s in stem occupations?>>I don’t have charts to show you today,
but we do keep track — when we go out recruiting, we have a strategy and we look at U.S. News
& World Report for the rankings and ratings of the universities. We look at the populations
of each of the universities and look for heavy concentrations of women and a concentration
of women in the stem disciplines and other demographics as well. We are looking at trying
to do some real targeted recruiting in various areas, so this is an example of metrics and
data and what we are wanting to pursue. I don’t have anything specific about the NASA
metrics, but we are involved with that as well.>>I don’t have metrics with me either, but
we do look at the ideal employers survey, that provides a lot of detail about what students
are looking for is an ideal employer both in male and female breakdowns. That is one
thing we do use, but we do look at the demographics of the schools we go out to and when we go
to the career fairs, we contact individual student associations on campus, and reach
out to them and let them know we are going to be there. We let them know when and where
so they can extend the invitation to their members.>>We use the employee viewpoint survey quite
a bit. We try to improve the work force and use that data when we go out recruiting to
show students where we rank. That is important — the whole idea of if we hire you to get
to a certain location, this is what it’s going to be like. People are more and more interested
in the overall experience and not just the first job.>>In your opinion, how did the government
shutdown as well as the previous pay freezes effect stem recruiting and women honestly
desiring to join the government?>>I don’t have any scientific data on that.
I don’t know if it affected us to medical he in any way. We couldn’t attend career fairs
and did not miss out on too many of them due to the shut down. Only one or two of them
we could not attend but we made up for it by going into January and February. I don’t
think the shutdown had any effect. I don’t think it had any specific effect on NASA.
I don’t know if at some point we will see some anecdotal information or if we go out
recruiting, I don’t believe we’ve had any questions when we’ve gone out to different
events asking specifically about furloughs or if we are going to have a furlough. Nothing
like that has happened. The people we are primarily attracting at NASA, I would probably
say money is not really the motivator. It’s the mission of the motivator and the particular
organizations.>>Next question is many stem employees in
the government are attracted to the agency’s mission. But office — sexual harassment where
women are minorities are still a problem. How would you best tackle this harassment
in the work lays? Or>>It goes back to education. There’s a lot
of training programs and educational programs. We have a strong partnership with the office
of equal opportunity and diversity to train supervisors about these primitive practices
in the workforce. One thing we tried to do is we tried to encourage people to actually
report something if there’s something that occurred so a proper investigation could be
done. I think it is about the education, actually reporting something and making sure these
issues are handled in a timely manner.>>That is what we do at the NRC as well.
With the same policy and procedures training the education and workforce to make sure people
are comfortable reporting any issues.>>This individual has several questions,
so I will take one at a time. Do you consider recruitment specialize customer let me read
them and you can see. Do you consider them specialize and would you recommend an agency
dedicated portion of its talent and management system or will NHR general suffice? How can
we encourage leadership who often lack experience — it’s sort of related.>>The NRC, most of our focus is on the technical
side, so more scientific and engineers, so our focus is pushed toward that to begin with.
We typically do not have much of a hard time filling in the corporate support side of the
business when we have the need. As for the percentage of budget, almost all of ours goes
to the career fairs focused on the technical side.>>I think it is important to pair up a generalist
with someone from the stem field. I think that is important when you are out recruiting
or in a virtual conference call or anything like that. There are specific questions students
are asking about what is a day like for an engineer or scientist. It makes a really nice
partnership to have a journalist alongside a technical person kind of explain the whole
picture to the individuals and I think we missed this second part of your question.
What was
the second part of your question?>>How can we encourage leadership to support
the recruitment of college students or recent graduates that lack experience so that it
is worth the investment?>>I would encourage agencies to really look
at the pathways internal program and really try to carve out some resources that could
be dedicated to the program. I think it is an excellent way and a win/win for the agency
to see the energy and enthusiasm and work individual students can bring as well as the
other side for interested students to come and see what it is like at that agency and
get some real world experience. I think leaders would find it is a win/win proposition. But
just takes that investment in carving out resources for the pathways intern program.>>I can give you a break on this 1 — folks
have asked if they can get copies of the slides. We are going to make copies of the slides
available but we will probably send that out via the same distribution lists from which
you learned about this webcast. The webcast itself will be available immediately after
the live web cast using the same link. Just a little carry out there — make sure you
go beyond the first hour because you are not actually going to get the material until about
an hour and half later until it is edited. At this moment, we do not have any additional
questions, so if we do, we have a few minutes left, feel free, otherwise I will turn it
back over to Kim.>>Again, I would like to thank Natalie and
Kim for participating in this webcast today. You’ve heard a lot about the experiences both
agencies bring to the table and I think there’s a lot agencies in OPM can learn from the strategies
and initiatives have put in place to make sure they are focusing their efforts on recruiting
women and girls in stem. You have heard them talk about the pathway programs and your experience
with that and just the fact we have to focus on helping the general public and students
and incoming employees am just educate them about the benefits of the federal government
and the different missions the agencies have in place that will help energize and enhance
their and easy as about wanting to serve will stop with that, I want to thank them once
again for their presentations and thank you for tuning in for the presentation we have
today. This is just one webcast in a series that we have planned for you. We are interested
in continuing to work with Ellie agencies and partner with the pay equality across the
federal government in federal practices and recruiting for hiring women into stem and
on traditional occupations will stop our next session we have on tap will be effective practices
in hiring women in leadership positions. The date will be confirmed soon but I hope you
will take the time and the presentation will be available immediately a we will make slides
available as well as the recording. If you are interested as participating as a speaker
in the next session, I would encourage you to contact Carmen at outreach at OPM.gov.
If you have a topic you think would be good for future presentations, we welcome your
feedback as well. Tank you for participating until next time. .

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