Bonus Webinar: An Introduction to Advising Highly Mobile Students

Bonus Webinar: An Introduction to Advising Highly Mobile Students


– [Lara] Alright we’re going
to go ahead and get started. Good afternoon, everyone. Thank you so much for joining us today for our monthly webinar series. We have added in an additional webinar during the month of March, as we partner with the
Texas Education Agency, and the Military Child Education Coalition to provide educators with
some valuable resources on working with students in
your schools and communities that are highly mobile. We are very excited about this topic as it relates not only to educators, but to other organizations
and professionals that work to support our
highly mobile students. Thank you in advance for your interest in our Texas-based organization and also to all of our returning users. We’re looking forward
to learning and sharing some great information with
you today during our webinar. For all of those joining the webinar, you will receive a link
to access the recording, and we will also be posting
all of our webinar content on our website, texasoncourse.org. We’ll go ahead and get started with just some general
tips to keep you engaged during the webinar so you
can hear and see everything. We know it’s a busy time of year, we certainly value your time, so we’re going to go ahead and get started with just a short orientation of Zoom which is our webinar platform. So if you can hear and
see our presentation, you have successfully
launched Zoom on your device, which is the platform that
we use for our webinars. Here are just a few tools
to change your settings and make sure you can
participate during the webinar. The first one is your audio, so you can turn your volume
and also check your speaker. We’re in webinar format
today, so everyone, all of the attendees are actually muted so you can use the chatbox, we’ll save room and time for
questions toward the end. And the panelists and the
guest speakers are all unmuted. This next one is a way to raise your hand and lower your hand. Rose Frezza our Communications Coordinator is going to keep track of
anyone that raises their hand or adds anything into the chatbox, so she’s going to keep
track of that for us today. And you can also add
in question and answers into the Q&A box that looks like this, we’ll make sure we get
those answered for you. And you can also change your screen size in the top right hand corner. So we get a lot of questions about who we are and what we do exactly because we’re kind of new. But Texas OnCourse is an initiative led by the University of Texas at Austin, and that is where we’re housed. Our organization was created as a result of the Texas legislature
as a collaborative effort between UT Austin, the
Texas Education Agency, the Texas Workforce Commission, and The Higher Education
Coordinating Board. In 2016 the governor created the Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative and we all work together to better connect education and industry
within the state of Texas. So what do we do? Our goal is to be the
state’s definitive resource for college and career planning, and reach as many people as we can across the state and also beyond. So we develop many
resources for educators, students, and families to better prepare for postsecondary success, starting in as early as
the middle school grades. During the webinar, we will
highlight some valuable tools from our website and also
review our module on this topic, that’s located within our
professional learning platform for educators which is called the Academy. How can we serve you? So we find that many educators have to go to several different places for professional development
and that can often be very time-consuming and tedious. As a result of that, we’ve made an effort to provide professional development as well as free advising tools,
resources, and curriculum to support your advising
strategies with students in whatever capacity that may be. The users of our tools include middle and high school counselors, teachers, administrators, and community-based organizations that focus on postsecondary success. Our vision for Texas OnCourse is that every high school graduate, no matter where they come
from or where they’re going, has a plan for what’s next. It’s kind of our simple message, but also that everything that we create we do with this vision in mind. So just to go over a few numbers about who was using Texas OnCourse, as many of you know when we began over 2500 counselors and
advisers across the state helped us build our resources. This essentially means that
our resources were created by counselors and advisers
for counselors and advisers. So fast forward to today, and we have 11152 educators
that are registered for our resources, 2800 schools across the state, and 926 school districts. That is actually over 75% of
the districts in the state, so we have seen a lot of growth in a very short amount of time. We’re also seeing an increase
in the number of teachers that are using our resources, as well as middle school educators. We also have over 20000
middle school students using our middle school resources, and these include our career
exploration game MiddleGalaxy, and MapMyGrad, a graduation
planning resource. So for some of our webinar attendees that may be new to Texas OnCourse, it would be helpful to
check out our website, texasoncourse.org, and our
homepage can be found here and it looks like this. You’ll find some valuable information including relevant blogs, a
calendar with important dates, and our tools bar will show
the bulk of our resources. Jaslyn Greene from Texas OnCourse is going to take a deeper
dive into our learning module that is our focus today on
advising highly mobile students. But we encourage you to
also take a look around and explore our site for yourselves. So we want to welcome Texas OnCourse users and anyone that’s joining
the webinar today. We have over 175 people registered, so we will send this
out to a lot of people. The professional learning
we’ve been talking about and that we’ll go over today is known as the Academy, and it now
has four content areas. Those include Career
Pathways, Financial Aid, Postsecondary Pathways,
and now Specialties. Each content area has
learning modules and badges that we will show in just a few minutes, but it’s helpful to know that these are the major areas of learning
within the Academy. So I just want to briefly go
over our agenda for the webinar and then we’ll give our
guest speakers some time. So we wanted to provide
enough time for them to share their information. We want to welcome everyone and provide some time for everyone to
do quick introductions. Then Jaslyn Greene our Associate Director of Content and Resources will highlight the elements of our learning module on advising highly mobile students, and other Texas OnCourse resources. Then we have Annette Farmer, Vice President of Programs and Curriculum, and she’s our guest speaker
from the Military Child Education Coalition. She’ll share some resources and programs they’ve created that
support these families. Then we have Abby Rodriguez joining us from the Texas Education Agency. Abby is the State Coordinator for military connected students. (audio drops out) those
questions and then wrap up. So I’ll start with my
own short introduction. My name’s Lara Gueguen, I’m Senior Partnerships Coordinator here at Texas OnCourse. I have a K through 12 counseling
and advising background, and I work closely with
our school districts in how they implement our
middle school resources, as well as our fellows and counselors that use the Academy across the state. – [Jaslyn] Good afternoon,
my name is Jaslyn Greene, I am the Associate Director of Content and Resources on the
Texas OnCourse initiative. I have a background in
college and career readiness, and access for students at the K12 level. – [Annette] Good afternoon,
I’m Annette Farmer, I am Vice President of
Programs and Curriculu, for Military Child Education Coalition. I have a background in law and I’ve been with the
organization for over eight years. The mission of Military
Child Education Coalition is near and dear to my
heart as a granddaughter to two career military grandfathers, the wife to an Army veteran and a mom. – [Abby] Good afternoon everyone, thank you for joining the webinar today. My name is Abby Rodriguez,
the State Coordinator for Military Connected Students. I joined the Texas
Education Agency in 2017 as a State Coordinator
with a primary focus on building capacity within the agency and our Texas public schools to address the unique needs of
military connected students transitioning in and out
of our public schools as one or both parents serve our country. I’ve been working with highly
mobile and at-risk students and their families in Texas public schools for over 12 years and I’m
dedicated to finding solutions to ensure education
equity for all children. I am also honored to be a proud daughter of a Marine veteran. – [Jaslyn] Good afternoon
again, this is Jaslyn. And I want to talk a little bit about how we’ve partnered for success. We at Texas OnCourse
decided to partner with the Military Child
Education Coalition team in an effort to really
just combine our work and our efforts around supporting those highly mobile students and families. The ultimate goal of our partnership was to expand access
to tools and resources for supporting and
advising military-connected and other types of highly
mobile students and families on their postsecondary and career options. As a result of this partnership, we were able to pool
together our resources to design and develop a professional development
training module. This training module helps anyone advising highly mobile students and families with just number one
understanding what is meant when we say highly mobile, how can they make a difference
in the transition process for millions of military-connected and other types of highly mobile students. This module is currently
available at what we call Texas OnCourse Academy,
and it’s unique because it’s currently the only module available for use throughout the US. The module is both on-demand
and also competency-based, so after successfully
completing the module, you’ll be able to demonstrate your ability to assist highly mobile and
military-connected students and families with the transition to new secondary schools,
postsecondary and career planning, as well as personal
and social development. You’ll learn how to describe policies related to highly mobile students, how to differentiate between the types of highly mobile students
and the challenges each type faces, and how to describe strategies to address some of those basic needs of highly mobile and military-connected students. So the module we developed is entitled, Advising Highly Mobile Students, and again it is located in what we call Texas OnCourse Academy. One way to access the
module is by visiting our website, texasoncourse.org, and selecting TOOLS and
then you would dropdown to Texas OnCourse Academy. Next you’ll see this screen, and you will basically just select the Educator login button to continue. Current users would just enter
their credentials to log in, and our new users would select the Need to register link at the bottom. This will bring up the registration page that will allow new users
to create an account. You will enter basic information
like your name, occupation, you would select your current state. One thing I’d like to mention is that you will need to verify your email address immediately after you create your account. You’ll have one-time
access to the platform to view the module but if you return without verifying your email, the system will require you to
do so before you log back in. Once you’re logged in
you’ll see the dashboard. Again this is the only module that’s currently available
outside of the state of Texas, so once you log in as a non-Texas user, you’ll only have access to the Advising Highly
Mobile Students module, but you can begin the module by clicking the continue button on the
left side of the screen, or clicking the continue button right next to the title of the module under the Content Area
and competency section. After successfully completing the module you will earn a digital badge. Once logged in as a Texas user, this is the dashboard you’ll see, similar to the non-Texas users there are two ways to access the module. On the left you can actually alphabetize the list of all modules and
the Highly Mobile module will be the second module on the list, or also access it under
the Content Area section. Texas users have an opportunity also to earn a digital badge as well as continued professional
education credits certificate. The module begins with an introduction. The nice thing about it is
the introduction provides a short, one minute video
available for anyone to view and learn a little bit more about what’s covered within the module before accessing the
remainder of the content. As I mentioned before, the
module is competency-based, so after the introduction
you’ll take a pre-assessment, which allows you to gain credit
for your prior knowledge. After completing the pre-assessment you’ll see a green check mark next to the content that you’ve demonstrated you have prior knowledge in, allowing you an opportunity to truly focus on the content that you may
not be as familiar with. This does not mean that you can’t access the information with
the green check marks. We truly encourage you to do so because there are several
valuable resources that can aid your advising sessions. Unit 1 focuses on preparation information to understanding some of the common needs of highly mobile students, as well as the available
programs and resources. Unit 2 focuses on understanding some of the core issues
highly mobile students face as they transition from state to state, as well as from school to school. Unit 3 provides information
on strategies and tips for supporting highly mobile students. Unit 4 focuses on engaging
students’ entire family, as well as it highlights a
few common mistakes to avoid in advising sessions when supporting highly mobile students and their families. At the conclusion of the module, you’ll complete an end
of module assessment. This final assessment is used to determine your mastery of content in the module, as well as grant you the digital badge. One of our goals at Texas OnCourse is to ensure that the Academy includes infographics that you
as counselors, advisers, mentors and others who
are supporting students can download, print, and immediately use in meeting sessions with
students and families. These are the two resources that we would like to highlight today. The first infographic we
would like to highlight is entitled, Strategies to
Support Highly Mobile Students. As school counselors and advisers and others supporting these students, they’re really the first line of stability for highly mobile students, so when school counselors are mindful about positive strategies
to mitigate stress during transition for students, they create a more positive environment and smooth paths of college
and career readiness. Here are some strategies
for helping students get credit and transcripts
transferred to their new school. It includes tips like
hand-carrying records and having open line of communication between the sending and receiving schools to ultimately help highly mobile students with course placement. This infographic can be found in Unit 3 of the Advising Highly
Mobile Students module on the high school planning page. The next infographic
we’d like to highlight is resources for highly mobile students. Various studies have
found student mobility to be associated with
low school engagement, poor grades in core subjects, and a higher risk of
dropout of high school. It is important to understand
that mobility patterns are different for homeless students, children from low income families, children of parents who are
incarcerated and also divorced, and many other demographics. These are resources that are available to really support the various types of highly mobile students. Some of them are general in nature, and others are very specific
to the particular challenges faced by each student group. Please visit Unit 1 of the Advising Highly
Mobile Students module on the programs and resources that assist students with transitions page to download this today. In each module in Texas OnCourse Academy, we’ve generated a number of resources including infographics and handouts that you can print out,
hand out to students, or even hang up in your office. You can find these resources
throughout each of the modules but you can also find the resources from the module we’re discussing
today on our Pinterest. Here’s a snapshot of the Pinterest board for our Advising Highly
Mobile Students module. You can access the board by visiting pinterest.com/texasoncourse. And now I’ll turn it over to Annette from the Military Child
Education Coalition to share some additional
resources, Annette? – [Annette] Thank you Jaslyn. First I’d like to thank
Texas OnCourse Academy and Texas OnCourse for
this great partnership, it has really been a joy
working with you all. And of course this wouldn’t be possible without funding through
the Texas Education Agency and so thank you Abby for all the support that you all have given us from
the Texas Education Agency. Military Child Education Coalition is a 501c3 nonprofit organization
headquartered in Texas, but really we serve
military-connected children throughout the United States
and throughout the world as we have installations overseas as well. Our mission is to ensure inclusive, quality educational opportunities for all military children
affected by mobility, family separation, and transition. These students move on
average six to nine times, and of course with each move
requires a school transition. And so the reason we wanted to partner with Texas OnCourse
Academy or Texas OnCourse, I’m sorry I keep saying academy, is to really be able to reach all of the school professionals
who support these children in these transitions. As you could imagine with each transition comes transcript translation challenges that may come up to make sure that all of the credits transfer from one school to the next. As a student moves from
one school to the next, they may experience a
gap in learning certain topics if that topic was covered earlier in the year at one location, and later in the year at another location when the student moves
they may unfortunately miss one of those topics. And so we really try to provide resources, programs, services, that help address those kind of challenges that these children experienced. In addition, just going to a new school has its own social emotional aspects in making new friends and finding out what’s the in thing to
do at that location, and so we have programs
that also address that. Next slide please. So I want to give you just a quick tour of our website and the resources that can be located there. The first one is, this is our homepage, and we have a scrolling banner so each time you go back to the homepage it might be a different look, but if you go up to the top bar you’ll see Programs,
Training & Initiatives. There you can see that we have topics for parents, students, professionals, and then we have specific
professional development training. And of course you can look
down and see the other options. We’re going to look quickly at the professional development topic. And you can see again,
about midway in the page, you could go jump directly to what kind of offerings do we have for parents, what kind of offerings
do we have for students, and then what do we
have for professionals? Because it relates a little
bit more to our audience today, I’m going to focus more into
what we offer for professionals. But I just want to point
out you can sort down below for whatever specific
topic you’re looking for, so you can see just a glimpse poking up down there at the bottom, Helping Military Children
Discover Their S.P.A.R.C. If you were to sort in the
audience column for professionals and then if you sorted in the topic for professional development, and you wanted a format
of one day training, it would call up this option. And of course you could do one of those, you don’t have to hit all
three of those options just to pull that up but it will get there a few different ways. If we can go to the next slide please? So if you go further into
professional development training we offer seven face-to-face trainings and two online trainings that
cover a variety of topics related to military-connected students, and various things that
are specific to them. You could go a little bit further, and I haven’t included that slide in here, but if you click on the
traditional courses, you’d be able to register, see the selection of face-to-face
trainings that we offer. They are all one day trainings, and you know you could pick the one that is most appropriate for your needs. And then if you look down below, unfortunately the
wording has been cut off, but the gentleman sitting at the computer that’s our two online trainings
that we offer as well. And then if you look over
to the side of this screen you’ll see customized
professional development to meet campus and district goals, so we are able to tailor things specific to a school district or
specific school’s needs. And then of course you see, down below, the Texas OnCourse and link to get to the module that Jaslyn
was just going through. Next slide? If you go back to our homepage, again we have a different picture, these are students who joined us at our Frances Hesselbein
Student Leadership Program. We have two each year, one with West Point and one with the US Air Force Academy. Great group of kids there. If you go over to the RESOURCES tab you would pull down the
little toolbar and it shows the topics that we would have under there. So college, workforce, and life readiness, exceptional needs, and so on. We’ll focus on college,
workforce, and life readiness and transition, ’cause I
think those might be topics that are of most interest
right at the moment. And so if you clicked on Resources, and then you go to College,
Workforce, & Life Readiness, it would take you to the next slide. And there you would see all the different, we have a number of webinars
and a variety of other options that would really
address this topic. And so this would be a way
that you could get there, again you have the three
methods for sorting, and so if you weren’t really
interested in a webinar, you could click on the All Formats and look for items in print, and you know if we have
face-to-face topics or whatever format, you could go there and find the different ways we deliver it. Next slide? And if you go back to our Resources page we can look under Transition since that’s the topic of the module that we’re discussing. And at that location, next slide? Again you would see a variety of topics and resources that we have addressing the topic of transition. And again, the sorting
research method is the same. Next slide? So in addition to a very full website, and we have quite a few
resources stored on there, hopefully this really brief overview has given you an idea of how
to navigate through that, we have ways to stay engaged
and in touch with us. Voice for the Military
Child is our newsletter, so if you would click at
the link that’s shown there, or if you follow that link, you could sign up and we
would send out newsletters periodically just keeping you up-to-date on new things that are going
on with the organization. You could also join us for our webinars, and there’s the link for those. And then we have a really,
really great podcast activity going on and
you could join us there at Google Play Store, iTunes, or Podbean. Of course if you have any questions please my contact information is there and I’d love to hear from
any of you, thank you. And I think we’re going to
turn it over to Abby now. – [Abby] Hello everyone. Thank you again to Texas OnCourse and to the Military
Child Education Coalition for giving me this
opportunity to speak about Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division, specifically toward
military-connected students, next slide please. I’ll start off by introducing you to the Texas Education
Agency’s Strategic Plan. Our ultimate goal at the agency is to improve student outcomes, and see more students
transition to college, career, or the military. The Strategic Plan can be found online on the Texas Education Agency’s website. You will find Agency’s
mission, philosophy, goals, objectives, and strategies. Next slide please? To achieve the vision for
public education in Texas, the Agency has outlined
specific priorities to guide and focus our work on behalf of more than five million
children in our state. Both agency enablers strengthen
organizational foundations and ensuring compliance,
effective implementation of legislation and
informing policy-makers, are foundational elements
and critical drivers of the work of the Highly Mobile and At-Risk Student Programs
Division, next slide please? To align with the TEA’s strategic plan and agency priorities to ensure that all students are college, career, and military-prepared, the Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division was created under the Department
of Special Populations in the Office of Educator Support. The purpose of the Highly Mobile and At-Risk Student Programs Division is to improve the resources and tools available to educators as they serve our highly mobile and
at-risk student population, and also to improve student outcomes regardless of the student’s mobility and other barriers that might impact their academic success. Next side please? Our Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division includes military connected students, pregnancy related services, foster care and student success, the Texas Education for
Homeless Children and Youth, Migrant Education Program, and mental and behavioral health. We also participate on a number of inter-agency workgroups, and are responsible for a variety of legislative reports and inquiries concerning at-risk students. Our division is led by
our Executive Director of Special Populations,
Niloy Gangopadhyay, and our Director Kelly Kravitz. Next slide please? Each of our highly mobile
student populations have priority initiative projects that we’re focused on for
the next two school years. The military-connected projects are to increase the number of
military-connected students being identified by school districts and open enrollment charter schools by 3%, and to utilize the Military
Student Identifier data to create a suite of resources, and to assist our
educator service centers, also known as ESCs, our LEAs, which is our local education agencies, and our stakeholders to provide support to our military-connected
students and families. The Military Student Identifier data will also assist the agency to seek our local education
agencies’ input and feedback regarding their best
practices and strategies for their highly mobile
student population, again specific to military-connected. We hope to conduct site visits to LEAs to take a deeper dive to
discuss their best practices, strategies, as well as barriers that their student populations encounter as they transition from school to school or even out of state or
country, next slide please? Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, also known as ESSA, the federal education law
was signed by the President in December 2015 requiring
that all public schools collect data on active-duty military school-age children in
grades K through 12. There is no federal
requirement prior to 2015 to identify military-connected students therefore data regarding
academic achievement, attendance, graduation, and other educational
outcomes were unknown for this highly mobile student population. Texas however has been collecting the Military Student Identifier beginning in school year 2013-2014. Texas is also just a handful of states that identify not only our
active-duty student population but also our National
Guard and Reserve-connected student population. Texas law under the Texas Education Code 25.006 C 1-2 requires that the agency collect
data each school year from school districts and open
enrollment charter schools through what we call our PEIMS related to enrollment of
military-connected students. And so PEIMS is actually
our Public Education Information Management System, encompassing all data
requested and received by the Texas Education Agency. This includes public education including students’ demographics, and academic performance,
campus personnel, financial and organization information. And I just want to remind everybody that student information is held to the utmost confidentiality and FERPA-related information
is protected under the law. Next slide please. The Military Student
Identifier is essential in identifying opportunities to increase educational outcomes for students transitioning in and out
of Texas public schools. Parents and guardians have the discretion to identify their child as
being military-connected to school districts. Parents and guardians are
typically asked these questions during the enrollment process
in their enrollment packet. The benefit to identifying their child is that educators would in turn be able to create or link the students to educational resources
and know what services the student could be eligible for. In Texas we identify active-duty military which includes Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard, and
National Guard and Reserve on Title 10 orders. And we do have all branches
of these armed forces represented in Texas. In addition we identify
our National Guard, which includes Army and Air, and our Reserve-connected students. Our Reserve unit is actually out located in Houston,
Texas in Ellington Field. We always include information
regarding our Veteran students even though currently we
are not required by law to identify them. We let educators know that transitioning from active-duty to a civilian can be challenging not only financially, emotionally, and
physically to our students and their families, so we definitely want to keep
these students on our radar. Next slide please. Texas has the second largest population of military-connected
students in the United States with more than 89000
attending public schools. Military-connected
children move on average of six to nine times
during their K through 12 educational experience. And 80% attend US public schools, to include charter and magnet schools. Children from military families are twice as likely as
their civilian counterparts to serve in the Armed Forces as adults. This is particularly important
to Texas public schools in that the 85th Texas
Legislature passed House Bill 22, establishing three domains for measuring academic performance of
districts and campuses. These three domains include
student achievement, school progress, and closing gaps. Districts receive a rating of A, B, C, D, or F for overall performance as well as performance in each domain. Campuses receive A through F ratings began in August of 2019. And under the student achievement domain there’s a college, career, and
military readiness component measuring graduates’ preparedness for college, workforce, or the military. They define that as military enlistment in the Armed Forces to include Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marines. Next slide please. In 2018-2019, military-connected
identified students PEIMS snapshot with 89736. Now snapshot are numbers
submitted by districts and numbers collected from
the last Friday in September to the last Friday in October of that particular school year. This submission is intended to give us a picture in time, or a
snapshot, of student enrollment. Our identified
military-connected student number actually increased by 2000 students from last school year 2017-2018 to current school year 2018-2019. The data on this slide can be
found on our agency website. You will also be able to
see the total enrollment and the number of students identified in the other student populations. And just to give you an
idea for end of year data, our end of year data for 2017-2018 had us at over 96000 identified
military-connected students. So we can definitely see
that our schools are gaining military-connected students
throughout the year. Next slide please. Through the data we are able to pull for the military-connected students, we were able to create this map of Texas indicating that we have
military-connected students attending public schools and
open enrollment charter schools in every region of Texas. This was huge for us when
we first created this map because we knew that we had
military-connected students kind of spread across Texas, we couldn’t necessarily say that we had a military-connected student attending every school campus in Texas, but now with the Military
Student Identifier and with this map, it definitely gives us a better idea and a rough estimate of where
our students are located. The legend to the bottom left indicates the range and
the number of students identified by region. The map also shows purple stars for the military installations. We’ve recently added
another star in region 13 for the new Army Futures Command that’s located at the
University of Texas campus. This regional map is also available online on our TEA military family resource page. Next slide please. To most effectively serve
our highly mobile students, identification is critical
to inform the parents, students, and educators of every right, resource and law they have access to regardless of their mobility. The challenges can be very similar, so school stability and
streamlining resources for our students is critical
to their academic success. Next slide please. In this instance for
military-connected students identification is important in determining whether or
not that they can benefit from provisions of the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity
for Military Children. The compact removes barriers
to educational success imposed upon children of military families because of frequent moves
and deployments of parents. In 2009 the 81st Texas Legislature adopted the compact into law in the Texas Education Code chapter 162. All 50 states and the District of Columbia have signed the Compact
for military children. Through the past year, we’ve learned a lot
about how various states have adopted the compact
into their legislation and we as an agency have learned the relationship of state law and local school district policy that drive the implementation
of the compact here in Texas. We also have learned that many advocates, families, and even educators
do not fully understand who is eligible and how
they could use the compact to ease transitions from state to state. We’ve had a great opportunity
to strengthen the knowledge of parents and educators
regarding the compact. One of the biggest things to
take away from the compact is that it allows
military-connected students with an active-duty service
member parent or guardian to receive a diploma
from the sending school if they do not meet
graduation requirements in the receiving school, and in this instance it
would be here in Texas. For more information on
the Texas Education Code chapter 162, you can visit our TEA military family resource page. But if you are an educator here in Texas, you have various guidance materials available to you in which
the compact is referenced, such as the Student Attendance
Accounting Handbook. Next slide please. And so we’ll talk a little
bit about resources. We at the Agency have built capacity to strengthen our
partnerships and coordination with various individuals and organizations supporting our military-connected students attending Texas public
schools, next slide please. Specifically, we have developed
a great working relationship with our school liaison officers, also known as SLOs. Our school liaison officers are located on the major installations across Texas. School liaison officers are funded by the federal government, and they assist our military families not only to transition in
and out of our schools, but also our communities. We have a standing
quarterly phone conference with our school liaison officers, and communicate the
same information to them as we are with our ESCs and our LEAs. On our TEA military family resource page, you will find an updated contact
list with their locations, so if you have a family
or maybe even a campus or an educator who has a question, they can always reach out to
their school liaison officers. Next slide please. We have also created a robust website filled with resources for students, parents, educators, and stakeholders working with military-connected families. The website has various
links to information to all of what we have spoken
to previously in the webinar, and I encourage everyone to not only visit the military-connected student webpage, but all of our student populations in the Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division team. You will also find contact information for all of the respective
state coordinators. Next slide please. So some upcoming news and
communications, next please. We are building capacity within our Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division to communicate and report
improved school experiences regardless of students’ mobility and other barriers that
impact academic success. To that end, we encourage everyone to sign up for our newsletter
updates as a division. But also the program areas that you are interested in learning about and receive more information on. You will see this Sign-Up for Updates page in which it’ll prompt you
to enter your email address. Next slide please. Then you will pick from the various topics that you would like to
receive more information on. I’ve gone ahead and highlighted all of the highly mobile
and at-risk student population categories. But I would also encourage you to check the highly mobile and
at-risk student populations topic as well. The Highly Mobile and At-Risk
Student Programs Division will be launching our
first ever newsletter the first week of April, so please be sure to sign up for that. Next slide please. Governor Abbott has proclaimed April as Month of the Military Child. Month of the Military Child is a time to honor the sacrifices made by military-connected children worldwide. Specifically on April 12th, 2019, Purple Up for Military
Kids will be celebrated to show support and to
thank military children for their strength and sacrifices. We encourage everyone to
wear purple on this day and wearing purple is a visible way to show support and thank
military-connected youth for their strength and sacrifices. Purple indicates that all branches in the military are supported, Air Force blue, Army green, Navy blue, Marine red, and Coast Guard blue, all combine together as
a single color, purple. You’ve also noticed on the right hand side on our page for the Texas Education Agency we actually have some links located for how to celebrate and give you ideas for Month of the Military Child. The Military Child Education Coalition actually provides a
toolkit on their website, so I definitely encourage everyone to not only purple up but really celebrate our military-connected
kiddos, next slide please. Here you will see my
program contact information. You’ll have a link to our TEA
military family resource page, as well as my telephone
number and email address. So if you ever have a question or concern regarding any of the topics concerning military-connected students, please feel free to reach out to me whether it be phone or email. Thank you so much for
taking the time out today to listen to our webinar. – [Lara] Great thank you so much. I just want to do a quick
recap on our resources that were highlighted, there were so many things
that everyone covered. I find it very interesting
we have such a high need for identification and
support for these students in our communities. And it was really compelling information that we have such a high number
of families here in Texas, almost 90000 families here in the state, and so the information
is super, super valuable, I did not know a lot of these
resources were available. So thank you to Jaslyn, Annette, and Abby for covering everything
from Texas OnCourse to Military Child Education
Coalition resources and also those from TEA. Let’s go ahead and
celebrate the month of April as the Month of the Military
Child Purple Up Day. We’ll make sure to put some
of that on social media. And thank you all so
much for your resources. At this time let’s kind of transition, and open it up for questions. I know we covered a lot
but you can feel free to take a minute, ask questions, and anyone who’s on the call or anyone who’s in the
webinar can go ahead and participate in those answers to what is relevant to your organization. And if we can’t find the answer, we can get back to you in an email and follow-up with your question. So just to reiterate, the chat function should be on your Zoom panel and you can type in the Q&A box and also in the chat, either one. – [Jaslyn] There is one question about whether or not the
webinar will be archived for viewing later. Yes we will have the webinar
available on our website as well as we’ll share the webinar with our partners the Military
Child Education Coalition for them to also share as well. – [Lara] Perfect, yes thank you Jaslyn. I don’t think we have any other questions, hang on one second. – [Jaslyn] There’s one question. This is Jaslyn again. So one person asked, when will this resource include specific transition guidance
for special needs students? That’s a great question. Texas OnCourse Academy currently
has the module entitled, Transition Services for Students with Disabilities specifically, and there’s a lot of great resources that we’ve partnered with the
Texas Workforce Commission, and their vocational
rehabilitation department to put out that resource, so definitely check out
that resource as well. – [Lara] Perfect we’ll
also check the chatbox and the questions before we
close out of our webinar, so we make sure we get
everything answered. But I just wanted to quickly put up our website that we covered, and we have a couple of
different newsletters. This is the link right
here for you to sign up for whatever you’d like. We have a couple different things that we send out to our users. The first is The Playbook
which includes resources to support college and
career teaching and advising which is like for practitioners and folks that are doing
this kind of thing every day. We also have an overarching
sort of News and Updates which provides a monthly news update and events that we’re having. We have fellows that
are all across the state in every region in Texas. Many of them are doing
professional development events and presentations, so
we have a lot coming up this next school year so, and also even in the summer. So make sure to follow us
on Twitter and Facebook, that’s how you can find us, and we also have a YouTube channel that is very easy to find. We will put this webinar
also on that channel as well. And we’re going to get
to one more question. – [Rose] The question is, are there any specific resources that you recommend looking at if a person is a new
high school counselor? – [Jaslyn] So Abby you
may be able to speak to the Texas Education resources, but I’ll speak a little
bit about Texas OnCourse. As a new high school counselor, our resources are
designed for exactly that. You kind of don’t know what
you don’t know basically at that stage and so we truly recommend you check out Texas OnCourse Academy. There are additional resources about supporting students
on financial aid, career planning, high school endorsements, and so much more so, the nice thing about it is that we do have that pre-assessment available, so you are able to just kind
of figure out what do you know, and then just focus on what
else information is available. And again all of those
resources are included as well. – [Abby] And as far as the
Texas Education Agency, I would definitely recommend
going to our website. You will find various robust webpages for the different student populations, but also if you have questions for college, career, and military prep, or even special education services, all of our webpages are
built out very well. You will also find contact information, resources and tools, and so definitely, you know feel free to contact either the person or the number,
or even the email address. We definitely welcome any
questions or any concerns or even just to kind of guide
you in the right direction, we definitely welcome
those calls or emails. – [Lara] Perfect thank you Abby, that was a great response. Really quickly we’ll go over the webinars that we have, we have
three left through June. So April 2nd, which is on Tuesday, we’re going to cover essays,
writing samples, and resumes. May 7th, we will talk
about college readiness and the TSIA exam. And then in June we’ll sort of talk again on advising students with
unique needs and circumstances. And then very soon we’ll probably take a look at our webinar schedule for the 19-20 school year, and publish a new webinar series. We’ve had a lot of feedback on topics that our users are looking for and we’d like to add
some additional topics and then also just
create the whole calendar and add that so that
everyone has it available for next year. We’ll stay on for a couple of minutes, I would say ’cause we
ended a little bit early, but I do want to say thanks
everyone for joining us, especially our guest
speakers Abby and Annette. They’ve taken their time out of their day to share some really valuable information and we really appreciate it. So thank you to all attendees, like we said we will send an email and you’ll get the recording. Please share it with your colleagues and anyone that would
value this information, and check out our website. Okay it doesn’t look like we
have any other questions so, we will go ahead and close out. Thank you all, have a
wonderful rest of your day, and enjoy the week.

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