Captain Jay A. Kadowaki – Keynote Speaker – BCOE Commencement , June 13, 2011

Captain Jay A. Kadowaki – Keynote Speaker – BCOE Commencement , June 13, 2011


Thank you, and the last part was
unexpected. Now I’m pleased to introduce our keynote
speaker, Captain Jay A. Kadowaki. As the Naval Service Warfare Center, Corona
Divisions Command Officer, Captain Kadowaki leads the scientists
and engineers of the US Navy’s Independent Assessment Agent for
Training, Weapons and Combat Systems. He oversees one the newest federally
designated labs located at the Inland Empire Naval Base. Captain Kadowaki he is a 1986
graduate of US Naval Academy and received his master’s degree from Naval Postgraduate School. He’s a graduate of College of Naval
Command and Staff at the Naval War College and the Darden School of Business
Executive Program. During his distinguished career, Captain Kadowaki has been awarded four
Meritorious Service Awards, five Navy Commendation Medals, two Navy Achievement Medals and numerous
campaign and service awards. In October of last year, the captain
and I signed an agreement to formalize our long-standing
partnership, offering our graduate students
opportunity to work at this specialized facilities that the Naval Surface
Warfare Center and for the Navy to benefit from our faculty’s expertise. Please join me in welcoming Captain Jay
Kadowaki. [Kadowaki] All right, thanks Reza, Really a great opportunity to be able to
work with you… these past… two years and a real treat, and how about Andrew,
what poised young man, great job,
{applause} and he’s joining the Navy, Navy, thank you very much. So that’s a bravo zulu to Andrew, and that is,
for you non-Navy types, that means for a job well done, and again we’re looking forward to
having him as a shipmate and bringing him in as one of our own. And for Chancellor White, a BZ to you and
your team, sir, for producing such stellar engineers. You know, at the Naval Surface Warfare
Center in Corona, we have over 100 UCR graduates. I know there’s countless others that are
serving across the country. Now, I know for the class of 2011,
are you out there 2011? Where are you?
{cheering} Oh, there you are, 2011, good to
see you. I have great news. I know many of you are very
nervous right now as to what the future holds, and I have taken care of that y’all will
enlist in the Navy. I have buses I will be rolling up shortly. I will
shave your head, girls and boys alike, and you’ll commence your very great
journey. Just kidding, just kidding. All right, ladies and gentlemen – graduates – what
an honor to be here with you today, and I do have some great news about my commencement speech, because of my experience as a naval officer,
we are trained, and again this is not something that is easily trained in
those like me, who like me to speak, but we’re trained to be seen, to be brief and to be seated, and so if my remarks are not memorable
at least they will be much, much shorter than Chancellor White’s
Undercover Boss episode. And I do have a confession to make, and that confession is that this probably
standing here with you, College of Engineering, is probably one of the last
places I expected to be because I’ll tell you as a graduate of the United States Naval Academy,
with a bachelors of science degree in Economics …that I graduated, with what I consider distinction, I graduated. And I graduated what I’d like to refer
to as the top 95% of my class. Top 95% of my class, so you all took calculus, you do the math. So I like to do something special here today,
give a shout out to the bottom 5% of the class, to the bottom 5% of the class
you are the survivalist, you are the grinders, you are the bell-
curve makers.
{laughter} Your diploma will say… your diploma will the same thing as
your neighbor who graduated in the top 5% of their class. So well done. So seriously as the commanding officer of
the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Corona, gives me a great deal of pride to represent your Inland Empire Navy
base here today. I have the privilege of leading an
organization of 1000 scientists engineers as the Navy’s independent assessment agent, where we are charged with the awesome
responsibility of gauging the war fighting capability of our Navy ships and aircraft, defend
our nation and to preserve our freedom. Now how many of you knew that we had a
naval base 20 miles from here? Anybody? That’s good, no one knows that were there.
Because Inland Empire Magazine called us your secret weapon. I can tell you all that what we would do in this forum
I cannot share that with you because you all seem like a nice group and again
being a military man I would have to kill you. But I will tell you that we are one the
largest employers of scientists and engineers within this region. And if we were a corporation, and this is where my economics degree
comes in handy, our annual report would say that we have
a revenue over of over $250 million and because of our tactical expertise
it would list customers like Army, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marines, and of
course, the Navy. But that is not the full extent of the
list. We would also include other organizations
like NASA, which uses our one-of-a-kind measurement
facilities for their work. Now let me tell you, this really… I want you to see the work
that your tax dollars supporter through our stellar work force and our world-class laboratories. Last October Reza and I signed an
education partnership agreement between the Bourns College of
Engineering for Corona that enables us to share our
technical expertise and also provide access to our state of
the art facilities. What it also means is that one of the
Navy’s newest federal laboratories is now officially partnered with one of the UC’s top
engineering schools. That’s you, you’re part of that top engineering school. What’s more it’s a partnership between
two of the most diverse campuses in the country. Reza, Chancellor White, this is
something we both can be extremely proud of and that I want to publically applaud
your efforts and your support to make this reality. Well done, sir.
{applause} And for you students, and those coming behind you, this means
Bourns students can enhance your college experience through internships with us. Where you can work on tough technical
challenges of national importance, we’ll give me the inside secrets if you
work with us, and have a springboard into the
entire Navy research enterprise which IEEE ranked as the number one
government patent portfolio in the world. That’s right, the Navy’s patent portfolio is ranked number one in the world. That’s higher than NASA. Or the nations of Japan and France. This partnership also helps us maintain
technical excellence for the Navy with talented up-and-coming
scientists and engineers. And that would be each of you. And we pay well. We pay well. OK now you’re listening. That means you can afford your own place. Think about it. No more roommates. Walking around in your
underwear all day. Maybe even buy your own house or condo
shortly after you graduate. Okay maybe that’s a lofty goal, so if nothing else you can start to pay
off those hefty student loans that will come do shortly after you cross the
stage here today. And for your parents, the parents sitting
out there, I say that with my oldest heading off to
college in the Fall, that means no re-nesting with mom and dad once you graduate. Love you, Lindsey, but you’re always
welcome as a visitor in a non-resident status.
{laughter} This also means diversity. I mentioned
earlier the diversity we have on these two campuses and the importance the Navy has placed
on diversity for a number of years. And really what it’s all about is about
bringing the best solutions to bear for the security of our country. For we know that diversity of thought brings fresh approaches
to new challenges and it’s what makes America great. And diversity of thought comes from every
aspect of who you are – your gender, your upbringing, your culture, your
academic disciplines. And for us, diversity is how we
ensure the Navy reflects the face of the nation we still probably serve. So here’s a few examples. Diversity of thought is how we are using alternative energies
like bio-fuels the power F-18s and Navy ships. How we’re going to use alternative
energy sources for at least 40% the Navy’s total consumption by the year 2020. And we’re working on getting a synthetic
diesel pilot underway with UCR oh by the way. And how we are using the Navy ballistic
missile flight technology to help the Army defeat improvised explosive devices IED’s on the battlefield and that work is being led by UCR graduate, oh by the way. So that’s how we are using diversity in
a science and engineering environment to better the world we live in. And UCR graduates can be
part of this very proud team. So I come here today to ask you how you
might do that. How after spending four years prepping
for this day, well maybe five or six years, and oh my god for the parent that had to
support you for seven years, whatever it took to get through, how might you be a force for good in the world. With the talent that UCR minds have
seen come through our ranks those of you I’ve met here on
campus I am confident that you, no doubt, make this a better, more peaceful, more prosperous world. You have everything going for you. You have acquired great skill sets that…
here at the College of Engineering. I know the caliber of your faculty. You are limited only by the boldness of
your dreams. So, ask yourself, what will your professional resume say
in 30 years? What will you want your family
relationship to be decades from now? Or how will you define your personal
successes over the coming years? What will the whole you be? Will be defined by wealth? By professional achievement? Or through the knowledge that your work
has truly made a difference in the world. If you’re after wealth that’s easy to figure it out. Just check your bank account. Got a lot of money? You’re wealthy. You’ve achieved. If you want professional
achievement, check your office location. I suggest a
high floor with the corner office. If you want to make a difference then
check that content of your soul. And however you might see yourself as
you begin the next chapter of your life let me tell you that you’re making this world a better place. It is the most notable mission that you
might ever undertake, not to mention it is really, really good
for your soul. And as a former naval officer said during his inaugural
address as president, John F. Kennedy, he so brilliantly stated, “Ask not what your
country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” So here is where my very fine military
training helps me get inside your mind. I got a lot of mines talking to me right
now. This mission, should you choose to accept
it, is to answer the call. Answering the call gives you the
opportunity to give back to a nation that has given you so very much. Answering the call would give you a
fulfillment relatively few will ever really know. A guiding force to
do whatever it takes, however it takes you. And whether in
uniform, like Andrew, myself, or any veterans here today, whether a military civilian like the
thousand civilians who work for me at Naval Surface Warfare Center in Corona, or the over 200,000 that work for the Navy, whether a scientists or engineer working
in the private sector, to ensure our nation is at the forefront
of innovation and discovery to keep on our economic
base strong, whether a community volunteer helping
those less fortunate or those grade school students who have
never experienced the excitement of scientific discovery, you, each and every one of you, can answer
the call. If you’re wondering what the call is, it is what makes America the greatest,
most generous nation on Earth. It is the call, the call to serve. It has no sound, yet we can hear it. It echoes in the whispers retelling of
honorable sacrifices. We can see it in the eyes of men and
women infinitely more courageous and more driven them most. The call to serve has no weight, yet we can hold it in our hands. Commit to carrying it close your heart until our country is
safe. And the anguish of those less was
fortunate has been soothed. The call to serve is at once invisible,
yet always present. And for those who choose to answer
the call, your country, for your fellow man, for yourself, it is
the most powerful force on Earth. Congratulations on your …
congratulations on graduation and I thank you for allowing me to share
your very special day. {applause}

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