Episode 1: Welcome to RANC

Episode 1: Welcome to RANC


I wanted to join the
Navy because I wanted to travel, basically. Working up and sitting behind
a computer all day wasn’t really doing for me. Don’t know what to expect. Mom made me iron all my shirts
before I came up. I actually burnt myself learning
to iron this morning. Once you’re happy, leave
your bags there. Make your way back out
on the roadway. When I call your name here it’s
with a loud, clear chief. Everybody understand? Yes, chief. Roger. Cosy. Suppose I’ll get in trouble
if I jump on the bed? So this is home for the
next couple of months. At least I get my own
room for once. I’ve just received
26 Australians to turn into Naval officers. And that’s a pretty
huge job for me. But I’m ably assisted
by two stuff. Chief Anderson here who is your division chief petty officer. And Leading Seamen Lawrence who
is your divisional leading head, division junior sailor. OK, my role as a divisional
officer is I’m here to mentor you. I’m here to train you. I’m here to be your friend. I’m here as your
disciplinarian. I’m here to make sure you
get across the lines. We want to see team players. We want to see teamwork. The Navy is built on teamwork. And if we don’t have teamwork,
we don’t have a Navy, we don’t have Flinders division. We’ll do PT three, four,
five times a week. You’ll be waking up very
early every morning. You’ll have EMA, early morning
activities, which involves PT. It could be drill. It could be carrying
a rope and running it along the beach. It could be going for a swim. It could be a myriad
of things. We’ll teach you about
how to tie a know. We’ll teach you how
to drive a boat. And we’ll give you a boat
license so when you leave here you can go out and do some
recreational boating. [ALARM SOUNDING] Flinders, down this end. Where’s Flinders? Good morning. Good morning, sir. Day one and they’re
already in. We thought it might happen,
but we’re like, oh, they wouldn’t do it to us
on our first day. But, no it happened. Woke us up at 5:00 AM
and got us outside. The morning started
off with that. We assembled at the
evac point. And after that we basically
showered, shaved, got ready for marching. The marching this morning was a
little bit different to what I’d expected. It was interesting, sort of
hit hard when we started marching this morning. But I guess we’ll get used
to it after a few days. Yeah, a few people
looked very lost. I felt very lost. I hope I didn’t look too bad. Yeah, I’m sure we’ll
get used to it. My first day has been
pretty good. Done a bit of marching. Had breakfast in the morning. It was pretty good, actually,
bacon and eggs. I’d highly recommend it. I was anticipating to come
in and just be yelled and screamed at and told
to do 20 push ups. And so I was pretty much
expecting the worst and hoping for the best and, in fact, I
think so far, we’ve had it reasonably easy. But I expect that it’s
going to get a lot harder as we go along. Still going. Full of energy. Have to do PT in the arvo, so
it’s going to be little bit challenging. But it’ll be good fun. Around the goal posts
left to right. Go, now. Speed team, hurry up. Two ranks facing me. Let’s go. Sort it out. Start helping each other. Start getting everyone here. Yes, much better. And carriagemen. Boots to glutes. Change. Get your heels up to
your buttocks. Come on Braddie, do them well. Come on Brad. We just did the 2.4K run. And lots of sit ups
and push ups. And we got killed
by the PT guys. Yeah. When you’ve got people
yelling at you, it pushes you a bit harder. I think it’s good. I think it’s good. I think needed those sort
of personal trainers before we came here. You know, in our gyms at home. No, it’s good. It gets us moving. We know we’re not really
in trouble. They’re just trying to the
best to get us through. Yeah. Nice work. Come on [INAUDIBLE]. Because we’ve done so much
together and we’ve just helped each other when people are
yelling at us and stuff. We’ve known each other for
48 hours or something. Yeah, not even. Next five up, ready. Arms ready. Move up, move up. Safety jump, go. Oh, the things we do
for our country. It was good once you
get into it. Nice and relaxing. It was heaps better than
yesterday’s one. Drank about two liters
of sea water. Is there any more yellow
hats left? We’re about to go to
the [INAUDIBLE], which is pretty exciting. I guess it’s a little
beach Olympics. It will get us all going against
the other divisions. Flinders, of course, are going
to win because we’re the best so hopefully teamwork. We’ll get it together and
it should be good. We’ve got a group sand
castle building. We’ve got a flags race,
a beach flags race. We’ve got a running relay. We’ve got a beach relay. We’ve got a three-legged race. Two hours to build the best
sand sculpture imaginable. [START HORN] They came up with the
song themselves. They came up with the marching
moves themselves. So I’m very impressed with
what they’ve done so far. At the end of the day,
it’s not about whether they win or lose. It’s about that they’ve come
together as a team. On your marks. Get set. [START HORN] That was awesome. Last night I spoke to them about
what this was all about. It was about promoting
Navy values. About promoting esprit de
corps and teamwork. And also about just having a bit
of respite from the drill square a respite from
the PDAs, respite from myself as well. So I think this is what
they really needed.

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