How to Get a Job – Glassdoor Livestream with Facebook, Salesforce & Kaiser Permanente

How to Get a Job – Glassdoor Livestream with Facebook, Salesforce & Kaiser Permanente


– [Amy] Hi, everyone, and
welcome to Glassdoor’s How to Get a Job Live. My name is Amy Elisa Jackson, and I’m the editorial director at Glassdoor, and your host for today’s event. We’re live from the NASDAQ
Entrepreneurial Center in San Francisco, California. Over the next hour, we’ll bring you everything you need to know about how to search for, and apply, to the right job. We’ll give you tried and tested tips on how to get noticed by employers, plus, we’ll hear from
recruiters at Facebook, Salesforce, and Kaiser Permanente,
on how you can stand out from the competition. Then, have you ever applied to a
job and never heard back? Today, we’ll get to the
bottom of what really happens to your resume, after you
click that apply button. Along the way, you’ll also learn how one of the world’s
largest job sites, Glassdoor, helps you find a job that fits your life. To get us started, first we’ll find out sort
of where the jobs are, what roles are in demand, and how to apply to
the jobs the right way. Joining me are Glassdoor’s
Chief Economist, Doctor Andrew Chamberlain, and Job Search Expert, Scott Dobroski. Thanks, guys, for joining us.
– We’re so glad to be here.
– Hey, good to be here! – Let’s kind of set the scene. What’s really happening in
the job market right now? It seems like the
competition is pretty stiff. Andrew, can you give us some insight? Yes, so the job market today, I would say, is the strongest it’s been
in a generation, really. So you’ve got a very
low unemployment rate, close to four percent in some cities, and it’s a very good time
to be looking for a job. Many job seekers are really
in the driver’s seat, have a lot of bargaining power today. However, just because
there’s a lot of jobs, doesn’t mean it’s easy to get a job. Because employers today
are inundated with resumes, it’s getting harder than
ever to sort yourself out from the competition, and also, if you’ve been
out of the job market for a few years, the landscape for skills has really changed. And so, you might not really
know how to fit yourself in anymore. So my best advice for people today, even though it’s a strong job market, you gotta find ways to
differentiate yourself from the competition, and
do the homework beforehand, to make sure that you’re
a good fit for a job before you put your name
in the hat with employers. – Now, Scott, and sort
of give us some insight as to how to distinguish yourself, and how to stand out from the competition. If it’s such a hot job market. – Yeah, well, you know, first you’ve gotta find
the jobs, so, there’s so many different ways you can find this job, but what
we really recommend, is identifying what’s
important to you first, and with, you know, a site like Glassdoor, anything you use, you
can search by filtering. So, filter by the type of company, the number of employees,
where it’s located, the industry it’s in, and you can apply the job title that you’re looking for, but the good thing with
today’s technology, is not only will you find specific job titles you’re looking for in
the search algorithms, you will also find related job titles. This is actually one of my favorite parts, because you may
discover a job in today’s evolving job landscape that
you don’t even know exists. Because, you might find a skillset from job A, and job B, but, lo
and behold, it’s called this. So, in addition to
looking at search results on page one or page two, go beyond that to look for related jobs, job titles you didn’t know existed, and then save it along the way, as you go, is a good recommendation, apply to them later, not too far later, cause
you don’t wanna miss out, but that’s how you wanna get started. It’s all about skills, and finding first the jobs
that are right for you. So you’re finding this,
this is really important. Right for you, customizing the job search, not spraying and praying. – Okay, now, Andrew, what are some of the hottest jobs right now? Everyone’s raving about tech, but, are those the only hot jobs? – Well, what is a best job differs, people to people, not everybody wants the same thing. But in general, I would say,
everybody wants three things. You want high pay, you want lots of job openings, and you want lots of people
who are in those jobs who say that they’re satisfied. So, every year Glassdoor publishes a Best Jobs in America list, and so, that’s a good
place to start, is like, use the data, to see, if you’re not quite sure
what your next step might be, you can use that list for some ideas of what are great jobs. I would highlight jobs
in really two sectors that are awesome to look at today. So, one is in technology. Now, when people think of tech jobs, mostly they think of software engineers. But it’s, you can work
in tech without being a programmer, today. There’s more jobs like strategy experts, marketing managers, product managers, many of these jobs don’t
require you to code, but they still get all
the amenities working in a fast-moving, growing tech industry. You can work in gray cities, and have a upward career arc. So that’s one place to think about. The second one is healthcare. So, healthcare is a huge
and booming industry, and I think it’s not
on many people’s radar, because many people think you
have to do medical school, or go through a long training program. That’s just not the case. So there’s many jobs, like Occupational, Occupational Therapist, for example, and Nursing Manager, these
are roles that all showed up on Glassdoor’s Best Jobs for 2018, that may not be on people’s radars. – Wow. What are some of the skills that recruiters and hiring managers
are really looking for right now? Because some of these, like you said, sort of coding, those are really specific skills. But are there universal skills that recruiters are really searching for? – One skill every recruiter wants is ability to work with data in some way. Doesn’t mean you have
to be a data scientist, or do any crazy machine learning, it just means, if you’re in
sales, or in marketing, or in any sort of management role, just having the ability to work with data, make decisions using it, know what’s good and bad use of data, that’s a very general skill that anyone can get up to
speed in less than a year. But I think more importantly
than data skills, people today are looking for flexible employees, who have a willingness to learn as the job market and the skills market changes. Ability, willingness to grow, so not just stay put where they are, but get out of their comfort zone, and keep learning, and have some grit to get through it. So I think job seekers
really need to demonstrate that they have grit,
that they wanna learn, and that they’re okay to get
out of their comfort zone and keep changing, and work,
as they ride the wave of their career as jobs keep changing. – Awesome. Now, Scott, now, I gotta ask you, how should job seekers display
some of these great skills on their resume? Because it’s hard to say, like, “Hey, “I’m flexible!” You know, that may not be a bullet point. But what are some of the
ways to display skills, in a competitive way, on a resume? – Right, so, here’s what we recommend, and we’ve seen a lot of different formats, and this is some general
advice for most people. At the very top, first of all, a professional summary
statement is a great way to go. Believe it or not, most recruiters or hiring managers, spend
about six or seven seconds on a resume. Now, you shouldn’t be offended by that, and a lot of jobs are gonna
be dozens, or even hundreds, so, you should expect that,
hear it, and address it. So, put two to three sentences at the top of your resume,
and remember, it’s not, “I want X position,” or,
“I want X opportunity.” If you’re applying to
it, they kinda know that. So, instead, you want to put why you stand out. What makes you different. What you’ve done a little
bit that makes you different from another marketing manager. From another software engineer, from another sales associate. What have you done that stands out. Then, you could go a
couple of different ways. You can highlight your
skillsets right below it, or you can do a timeline resume, which is still very popular. We recommend no more than 10 years of work experience that you’re
highlighting with bullets. In those bullets, here’s what
you’re really asking about. Is the data quantifying your success. That’s what today’s
recruiters are looking for in almost every industry, so, if you sell sweatshirts,
how many did you sell? How many days? And how much did it go
up during the busy time during the holidays, perhaps? If you write something online, well, how many clicks did you get to that, and where are these clicks coming from? What is that about? Hey, what if you’re, you’re
driving even, you know, Uber, or one of these ride sharing? How many rides are you doing,
who are you picking up, and kind of what’s your rate? And so, using some of these
numbers and comparisons, no matter what job you have, whether entry-level,
or 20 years on the job, this is how you scream out, “I can do this, “I’ve been successful.” – [Amy] Okay. Now, this is something that
I’ve always wanted to know. The cover letter. Is the cover letter dead, is it essential? Because every application, usually, will say, “Optional.” It can feel like a
trap, you can feel like, “Oh, let me “sort of do the blanket, you know, hey, “this is why you should
give me the job,” like, “Sincerely, Amy Elisa,” (laughs) but tell me–
– Well, okay. – –X-O-X-O. (laughs)
– Right, right. – But tell me a little bit
about the cover letter. Is it dead, is it essential?
– Yeah. Well, a couple options, right. So, if they say cover
letter required, guess what? You’re doing a cover letter. Okay, if it says
optional, we recommend it. If it doesn’t say anything,
you may wanna do it. Here’s why. If you have a lot of
resumes that come in to a recruiter or hiring manager, and let’s say you are one of
five people who look amazing? That’s great, congratulations. But if you want that added edge, if you want to stand out, a cover letter can be
your added opportunity to paint color around what they see, often very quickly, on your resume. So they can look at document A for kind of the nuts and bolts, and then look at document B for the why, and the how, you did those amazing stats, or you’re calling out those
skills and those achievements. The cover letter with quick introduction, one paragraph, two paragraph, and a closing paragraph, typically, a little added color on the
why, and the how you did it, how you accomplished those great things that you’re touting. – Awesome.
– I think there are two– – Yeah.
– –reasons why cover letters are not dead–
– Okay, give it to us. – One is many jobs today require better writing skills than ever, because more communication
is happening through emails and just, using the cover letter to highlight that you’ve got those skills
can be very valuable. Second, is every candidate
really needs to tell a story to a recruiter about how this role is
the next logical step in their progression. If you don’t use your cover
letter to tell the story about why you’re the right
person for that role, you’re shifting that burden onto them. They’re gonna have to look at
your background and resume, and make the story up for you about it. So, why not make it easier? Tell them the story, and let them see why you’re
the fit for the role. – Yeah, agree, agree. – Wonderful. One of the biggest things that’s in the news, and
everyone’s kind of wondering, is will robots take my job, right? AI, machine learning, it’s everywhere. We see it in our ads,
we’re seeing it everywhere. Andrew, what can you tell
us about some of the impact that robots, and technology have on jobs in the job market right now? – So, in general, what happens with Artificial Intelligence and robotics, is people don’t get replaced,
instead they team up with it. So what automation often
does is it takes the most routine aspects of a
job, does those for you, and then what it leaves behind are the hardest parts of the job, the
parts that are most human, and actually most valuable. And so, if you look at
history, and you look at things like ATMs, you know, bank teller
jobs didn’t disappear. Instead, what it did, is
it took the worst aspect of that job, did it easily, and then
it let bank tellers work on more sophisticated things, like being a personal banker, and doing sales of more sophisticated products. So, my advice for people for automation, is to find ways to learn
how automation’s being used in your industry, and find
ways to team up with it, so that you’re not at
risk of being replaced. Instead, you can, you can use automation to have superpowers, and be more productive
and then more valuable. – Okay, so good, so a
robot will not take my job, I will still be here–
– I think you’re safe. – I’m safe, okay.
– You are safe. – (sigh of relief) Just makin’ sure, you know, I’ve got bills to pay. – Right. (laughter) I hear you, yeah.
– Let’s transition, sort of, to a pain point that all of us have faced in applying for a job, sort of, you know, you
don’t really know how long it’s supposed to take. You click that submit button,
and you’re sort of, like, praying. You’re just kind of hoping and wishing that someone’s gonna get back to you, and that it’s not, like, in the vortex. Andrew, talk to me a little
bit about how long it takes to get hired, and what the job seekers who are tuning in, today, can expect in terms of how long it can take for a recruiter to get back to them. – US average is about 23 or 24 days. – Okay.
– To go through the end job interview process, but
that varies really widely. So if you’re applying to a, say, a federal government job in DC, it’ll probably be 60 or 70 days, or more. – Wow.
– Because there’s often many, many hoops you have to jump through, but if you’re a retail cashier in San Diego, say, it might be seven days or 10 days. So, generally, those delays have gotten
longer in recent years. So it is taking longer to get through job interview processes, today, and it’s because employers
are using more screens. Jobs are getting more technical, and employers are being more careful, making sure that people can actually do the things
they say they can do. So–
– It’s not a bad thing. – –not necessarily a bad
thing, so that really is the key takeaway. A long job interview process, by itself, may not be bad, because it might mean that you and the employer
are doing a very careful dating process to make sure that you guys are gonna fit, and work long-term. What is a red flag, is if a
hiring process is carrying on and you have repetitive steps. And that can often be a sign that maybe you’re not the top candidate, or that there’s disagreement, internally, about what this job is
supposed to be doing. So my recommendation for people is keep pinging, and expect
updates week after week. Don’t let seven days go by without pinging a recruiter
to find out where you stand. – [Amy] Are there ways
to sort of follow up with a recruiter that don’t
feel a little too stalkerish? Because you don’t wanna go too far left, you know?
– Yeah. So, it is a courting process,
that’s a really good analogy, and you hope that, in the
end, they swipe right on you. So to speak, okay. (laughter) So, kind of what we suggest here, is you formally apply from the beginning on the job application, and in fact, if you apply on Glassdoor, it often signals to employers that you may be a quality candidate. They like those candidates,
because it shows you’re doing your research, so, let’s
say you apply formally, what’s the next step? You’re kind of hoping you hear back, you’re right, you kind of just wanna be
heard and acknowledged, you know, it’s not a bad feeling, but it, it can give you a little, you know, antsiness. So, anyways, we recommend within 24
to 48 hours after hitting that apply button, it is generally okay to try and tap someone on the team that, “Hey, I’m really interested in the job.” This takes some tact, though. This is, again, not spraying and praying at everyone on the team. It is not tweeting at them. Here’s what you might do. You can look on professional
networks and find out who is on the team, perhaps who’s the hiring
manager, directly, or the director of that
team, if you really can find that out. And guess what? Most email addresses
at companies are often first name, dot last
name, at company dot com. Or, first initial, last
name, at company dot com. So, you could try some of these, emailing it to an individual. The worst thing you do
is you get a bounceback. And if you don’t get a
bounceback for the other one, well, guess what, it
probably went through. So that could be success. So it’s okay to email them, and let them know,
kindly, hello, my name is Scott, I applied for your,
formally, of your job, whatever it is, I wanted to let you know
I’m extremely interested, if you can help get my resume noticed, I certainly appreciate it. That’s all, super short, and clear, and guess what? Most people are often
willing to help people who have great interest
in joining their team. So there’s no guarantees,
but it’s an added way to get noticed. – Glassdoor has an amazing sort of arsenal, if you will,
of interview questions, and the ways that people
have been interviewed, and what their responses were, et cetera. But at the top companies that
everyone wants to apply to, what are some of the
questions they can expect for recruiters and hiring
managers to ask them? How can people, that were
tuning in, sort of prepare for a big interview?
– So, across all industries, and all companies, there tends to be some common themes and common questions, in fact, this is why we publish on our Glassdoor blog a list called The 50 Most
Common Interview Questions, and it’s actually one of
the most popular posts. So. Some questions that you can anticipate in almost any interview,
and get you ready for additional questions, include: who are you? Why are you applying to this job? Why this company? Why this role? Where do you hope to be in five years? Where do you hope to be in ten years? Tell me about your strengths,
and your weaknesses. And this is an interesting one, right, if they ask you about your weaknesses, do not say, “I’m a
perfectionist.” (laughter) They can see right through that one. And that one, that one almost gets asked a lot. Talk about what is truly, be transparent, what is truly a weakness,
but then, tell them how you are working on, on that weakness. Cause guess what? From CEO to entry-level, everyone has weaknesses. They also have strengths, hopefully. But it’s okay to acknowledge that. – Is it something, is it
important for people to sort of rehearse and
practice their answers to interview questions? Like, what’s the process for preparing for an interview? – Yes, without a doubt, yes. If you’re going in, and
it’s a real cool job, and at a cool company that you really want, you ought to rehearse. In fact, if you don’t rehearse, I might be scared for you,
cause there’s a lot of good candidates these days, is the truth, who can stand out. So, take those common interview questions, and ask them with a
loved one, or a friend, and literally do it, just, back and forth. They ask the question, you give an answer. Pause every now and then, and get feedback. Did you, one, truly answer
the question, and two, advance the conversation into the skills that the hiring manager is looking for. Are you solving their problem? Are you solving a
challenge that they have? Make it about them, and how you’re there to help the team, really. – [Amy] Wonderful. So, let’s just assume
that Joe the job seeker gets the interview, and now he’s been presented with an offer. Like, this is, like, the best thing ever. But Andrew, one of the biggest things about, sort of, the job search process, is salary negotiation.
– That’s right. – Oftentimes it’s very enticing, or, it’s tempting, to just accept the offer. You need a job, you want that job, you feel like it’s competitive. So you say, “Yes, please give me the job, “and I’ll take whatever you got,” but– (laughter)
– A mistake. – That would be kind of a mistake, but, approaching the salary
conversation can be tricky. It can be nerve-wracking. How should someone do
that, and why should they do some research?
– My opinion is everyone should negotiate, even–
– Oh. – –though it seems uncomfortable, you should always have a
conversation about pay. And the reason why is
because pay isn’t always just about you, personally. It’s about a market based on supply-and-demand
for the position. You should feel safe talking about pay because it’s really about the employer recognizing the value of the position they’re hiring for, and you just having an objective conversation about what the market is
willing to bear for this role. It’s not necessarily about your history, or anything about you. I think many people are
afraid they’re going to offend employers,
that employers will feel like they’re asking too much. So, the one piece of
advice I would give anyone who negotiates, is ground it in facts. Whatever data that you have. Don’t just come in with an opinion about what you think the value of this job is, or how much you’re worth. Instead, do some research, dig up whatever you can, use the tools on Glassdoor, for example, the, we have
a Know Your Worth tool on Glassdoor, which allows you to put in some information about yourself, information about the company and the job, and it’ll give you an estimate for the pay. I think that’s a good
conversation starting point. So, just like if you were searching for a home, you have to do some
research on home values and do comps, you should have comps for salary when you go to that negotiation table. And don’t start with
your lowest number first. – Okay, good, so, don’t start
with your lowest number. Are there some other
tips, because you could walk into the room, and, or, you’re not even in the room. Say you’re just on the phone,
and they make the offer, and you’re, you know, sort of stumbling and bumbling, you’re not
really sure what to say, or how to be that confident. What are some of the tips
around salary negotiation that you offer, Scott?
– Well, one, I agree with Andrew, negotiate. If you do not ask, you
do, you will not receive. And also, the biggest fear, we
hear this all the time from job seekers, and I
really wanna change this, is, people do not ask for, you know, or negotiate pay, cause their fear, fearful, they’re gonna
lose the opportunity. They’re fearful someone’s
gonna drop that phone, and go right to the next candidate. Most often, that’s not the case, in
fact, I’ll be honest, I’ve never seen that to be the case. – Me neither.
– So, employ, all right, employers expect you to negotiate, and remember, pay is often one factor of
your total compensation equation, even depending on the job, or level. It doesn’t always mean stock options. It doesn’t always mean bonuses. It can mean some reimbursements for travel, can mean reimbursements for food, it can be an added weekend off, all of these things have monetary value. So, basically, know your value, know your worth, go on Glassdoor, that’s why we exist, look up the specific role, in
the specific location for that company, and get a sense of what fair market value is at that time. Now, let’s do this, okay, we’re on the phone. – Yeah.
– And you are at, you offered me a job. Thank you so much, I’m considering! I’m just kidding–
– A little hard to get. – –I would love to work for you. But you know, and you, you kind of give me a number, let’s say. You give me $60,000 for X job. I could say, “Thank you so
much, that sounds wonderful. “Based on my research,
what I’ve discovered “for this market, right now, “for this job title, it
looks like about 65 to 70 “is what the market is paying. “Would you be willing “to go up for me?” – Absolutely, let me talk to my team and look back at that. You are a valuable
candidate, and I feel like you are worth–
– Thank you. – –65 to 70, so let me talk to my team. Are there any other things
that you’d like us to consider? – Yeah, well, and that’s how it goes, so, often, one single person, likely,
cannot say yes or no in a second. So it’s very often they
will go back to the team, and guess what? If they want you, cause
you’ve done such a good job showing them your skillset, they’re gonna ask and push for that, cause they want quality candidates. – I also understand that there are ways to negotiate, sort of, other things. Whether it’s vacation, or start date, or benefits, et cetera. Is that the case these days? – So, it is, yeah. Benefits can be a piece of your total compensation package, again, so, if you ask for another week off, remember, that’s 40 hours you’re
potentially out of the office, so there is a monetary value there. That’s kinda nice. Also, while I want everyone to earn more money, and earn what they’re worth, if it doesn’t quite happen
at the level you want, this is where you go to plan B. And that includes asking for benefits, are there any travel reimbursements? I go across this big bridge every day, I gotta drive an hour to and from, would you be willing to reimburse me? They might go yes or no, or they might say we have a shuttle, or they might say there’s a ride share, so they can work, work with that. You could have other, maybe, benefit, time off, or sick leave options, or whatever you need. Ask, again, if you don’t
ask, you won’t get, so have A, with the pay, and B with some benefits, potentially. – And I would say one of
the most common benefits people negotiate is flexible work. Ability to work from home, and it’s becoming–
– Really? – –even more common. Just from people trying to deal with their commutes, and so that’s one, an easy thing
for an employer to just let someone work from home.
– Yeah, rising trend, so that is a very common request, and
one that’s often accommodated. – Yeah.
– Wow, so an employer or hiring
manager wouldn’t be offended if you said, “Hey, “I wanted to see whether or not I can work “from home on Fridays, or whether I could “telecommute on Wednesdays–”
– Yeah. – That wouldn’t put anyone off? – No, for the right
candidate, I think people are willing to move on things like that. Of course, you can’t negotiate
for some benefits, like health insurance, like, that’s the plan for the entire employer, they’re not going to be able to move there. But for, for vacation time,
for flexible work schedules, for other items like that,
absolutely, people will move. – That’s great.
– And Amy, you asked, you actually used a very key word there. Offended, so if someone is
offended by your question, you may wanna look at the team, the department,
hopefully no one is offended by any question about a job, because it is a two-way street. Now, you can ask, and if they check, and your request cannot be
met, that’s another story. But if someone’s offended, that could be a red flag. – Good to know. So we’ve touched on sort of several topics around the job search, and
you’ve given great insight. But, what is your number one tip, we’re gonna do a little rapid fire, here, your number one tip for
each of these key elements of the job search? All right, are you ready? – We’re ready.
– Yeah. – You’re pumped, okay. (chuckling) Number one tip for how to
prepare for your job search. Scott. – Do your research, look
what others are saying. – Okay. Andrew?
– I, it’s like a home search. Get your references ready,
and your resume ready so when the right offer comes
open you can just take it. – How do you evaluate
if a job is a good fit? – Know what matters to you, and look at their mission,
and the job description. If the two align, go for it. If not, move on.
– Think about the product or service that the company is offering. If you can’t quit it, if you love it, that’s gonna be a great
place to work for you. – How do you evaluate a job description? They all seem the same, but how do you read between those lines? – Again, look for what matters to you. The job duties, but also,
the vision, the values of the company, and the pay. If it’s the perfect storm, and it looks pretty good
on all facets, go for it. If there’s a major red flag, move on, there are too many jobs. – My favorite way to
evaluate job descriptions? Take the description, and turn
it into your cover letter. If you can’t write a story
where you’re the main character that weaves together all
the top things in the job description, that’s probably not
the right role for you. – Okay, that is genius. (laughter) I’ve never thought of it that way–
– Try it, it really works. – –but it’s actually pretty genius, okay.
– Tell a story, he says. – Your number one tip for
building a top notch resume? – Okay. Professional summary, highlight your skills, experience, no more than one to two pages. – Okay.
– Even a Nobel Prize winner should have a one-page resume. If you have more to share, put
it on your personal website, put people, put the link to
the website on your resume. – Smart, smart. How do you prepare for an interview? Your number one tip? – Practice the questions
out loud, with a human. – Kay. – Always be ready to give three things that you will do with this
role, if you’re hired. If you can’t do that,
you’re not ready to go. – Man, Doctor Chamberlain, you’re hitting! All right, and lastly, your number one tip for how to follow up and seal the deal. – Ooh, good one, you go first. – I think a polite, short letter to everyone you met, not
just the hiring manager, everyone you met, goes a long way. If you leave that out, you
definitely will stand out for the worse.
– An email that day, a few hours later. Rapid response, people like that. – Wonderful, well,
thank you, guys, so much for joining us, tonight. That was a lot of great information. I loved the, like, don’t spray and pray. You know, Doctor Chamberlain, your details on sort of the job market, as well as sort of using the job description to funnel into your cover
letter were excellent. So thank you so, so much. – Thank you.
– Thank you, and good luck to everyone out there!
– All right, awesome. Now, let’s take a look at the
other side of the job search and hiring process. We’re gonna introduce three top recruiters who are gonna give you the skinny on exactly what they’re looking for at their respective companies. We’re gonna get insight as to what they’re looking for,
what roles they’re hiring for, we can’t wait. So joining me now is Liz Wamai, Recruiting
Director at Facebook, Ashley Core, Senior
Manager of Tech Recruiting and Infrastructure
Engineering at Salesforce, and Claire Arnold, Leadership Recruiter at Kaiser Permanente. Thank you so much, ladies, for joining me. – Hi, thanks for having–
– Thanks for having us. – So let’s kick things off, sort of giving our live stream watchers, viewers, sort of a look into the company culture at each of your, your companies. Talk to me a little bit
about what it’s like to work at Kaiser, Claire.
– Well, well, you know, Kaiser Permanente, we’re really large organization, and you think healthcare
industry, but we’re really a lot of other aspects
and facets to working the healthcare industry. I think it was mentioned earlier, that we have opportunities in
finance, in marketing, in sales, and really working at Kaiser Permanente, there are a lot of opportunities that potential candidates can,
can get into, and explore, and really develop their career within Kaiser Permanente. – Wonderful. Liz, Facebook is on everyone’s tongue these days. What makes it unique to work at Facebook? – First, thank you for having us here– – Absolutely.
– –it’s been a pleasure to come in. What makes it a pleasure
to work at Facebook, one, and I know this is gonna sound cliche, but the people. I think a lot of the
times, it’s the people that you work with, and how are the people that
you are working with committed to the mission,
to the values that are about Facebook, and
one thing I will say is the people that work
at Facebook tend to be very committed to the mission. Always, continually learning, and looking to have an impact. The other thing that
resonated with me, is around bringing your authentic self to work. Facebook is a sort of place where you have places where you bring your professional self from
Monday to Friday, and then your personal self over the weekend? And I will say that about
Facebook is about your authentic self, who you
are, how do you best work? And it’s all personal,
when you think about it. The other thing is around benefits, is the panel before talked about benefits and thinking about benefits? And for Facebook, is we
look at benefits about the different stages in your life. And how can Facebook aspire to meet you where you are,
however you define your family, however you define what
stage you are in life, it’s one of the benefits, and
the differentiating factors about Facebook. And then, finally, is around
the strengths-based culture. We are an environment that looks at what are your strengths,
what are your skills, what do you most enjoy playing at? 70, 80 percent of your
time is about the skills, that most play to your strengths, so, what differentiates that is about being a strengths-based culture that’s about you spending
most of your times on the things that you’re great at, the things that you enjoy, and that you’re going to do really well. – Okay, now, Ashley, Salesforce is, like, at the core of Salesforce is Ohana. But for those of us, and
folks who are tuning in, can you describe what that word means, and what it means to the
culture of Salesforce? – Absolutely, so Marc Benioff, when he chose to start Salesforce, or actually, before he chose to start Salesforce, he took a trip to Hawaii, where
he actually took a sabbatical, and he fell in love with the culture. And he fell in love with
the values around Ohana, and for those of you that don’t know, Ohana is Hawaiian for family. And basically, he decided, when he started Salesforce, to bake that into our culture,
from day one, and if you look at our visions and values statement, to this day, you know, he
started the company in 1999, now here in 2018, Ohana’s
actually our number one value. And our culture is
extremely important to us, but beyond, sort of, the corporate jargon, it really extends beyond just, you know, the members, the
employees of Salesforce. It extends into our community, with our volunteer hours. It extends to our customers, just with the community that
they feel around our products, and around being able to speak and use, speak to our products
and use our products. But for me, personally, just to get super real with you guys, I’ve been at Salesforce for five years. And I have been through an
engagement, a marriage. All these happy times, Salesforce
was there to lift me up. But also, you know, sadly, more recently, I’ve been through a divorce, as well, and Salesforce was
there, and I was able to bring my whole self to work,
during the entire time. Even being in leadership, and I had the support of my
managers, and my team, and it, it has been just remarkable to kind of
go through this evolution of highs and lows, with a
company that actually cares, and actually lets me be
me, at work, every day. Kind of going through, you
know, these major life changes, so, for that, you know,
that’s my personal experience, and for that I’m so grateful. – I completely relate to that. Being at Glassdoor has felt like family, and has felt, just, wonderful, going just, through the different stages of life. Sort of, Claire, my mom has been a Kaiser
physician for 35 years– – Oh, wow.
– (chuckles) In Southern California. She actually went on her interview for her residency, and
everything, at Kaiser almost a month after I was born. So, it’s been with us, I’ve been a Kaiser baby my whole life. (laughter) So, how does sort of
company culture at Kaiser differentiate between sort of, like, the corporate side, and hospital? Is there a difference, is it all one? What’s the, what’s the culture like? – Well, yes, because Kaiser Permanente is such a large organization, you are gonna see some subtle differences, or nuances between the
different locations, and medical centers. But, overall, universally, we have a general culture, where Kaiser is one that’s inclusive, and collaborative, and we support our employees in having a voice, and speaking out, and, so, I think that there is a great deal of
trust, and mutual respect between the staff, and the management, and with that, builds
a lot of collaboration. The staff feel that they have a voice, and they can speak out,
and make a difference and an impact in the work that they do, and how that impacts the healthcare in the US. And so, overall, there might be
some small differences here or there, but, generally, the environment and culture that you’ll see at any
Kaiser facility is one of inclusiveness and collaboration. – Wonderful. Liz, Facebook has been in the news, recently, to say it lightly. But, when you and when Facebook as a
company is sort of facing external pressures, like many other companies have, how does that impact sort
of workplace culture? How does that affect what is it like to work there? Does it affect it, does
it make you all stronger and sort of bond together? What’s it been like over
the past couple months? – You and my mom want to know. (laughter) I will say, you know, this
is not the first challenge that we’re facing. And, I expect it’s not
going to be the last that we’re facing. You know, just given our position in the world, is, I expect, that this
is going to be going on, given how many people that we impact, it’s going to go on, so, my mom has asked me about that. (laughter) So, what I would say is, one of our core values,
we have five core values. One of our core values is
around focusing on impact. And one of the ways that we make impact is working on some of the most important problems, and
key problems, in the world. And so, when we think
about who we’re hiring, when we think about who
we’re bringing on board, we focus a lot about people who are builders, people who are problem-solvers, people who want to have an impact. And as a recruiter, to me,
the way that manifests itself, a lot of the times, is
during times like this. Is that I do think it’s
a very opportune moment to think about people who are motivated by this, they
want to be a part of it. When you talk to them about, here, this is some of what we’re working on, is there are people who are driven by that and want to be a part about the mission, or building community, and bringing people in
the world closer together. And so, there are people
who are motivated by that. And then there are some who are not, and back to
what the panel said before is that that does help you sift through who is committed to what we’re about, in terms of having an impact. When I think about, at Facebook, right now, is because we’re focused on
problem-solvers, and builders, it has had a very galvanizing impact. And bringing people together. Rallying around leadership. And people wanted to help solve problems, solve some of the problems
that we’ve been talking about. One of, I think, 2018 marks our challenge this year is to fix Facebook. And to fix some of the
problems that I’ve been talking to him about over
the last couple of months, I’m sure a lot of people watched him at the Congressional hearings. And, so, one of the things
we’ve done is, then, focusing on people, then hiring people, then recruiting people, and
I can say, as a recruiter, it does help me differentiate. Who is really about,
I want to be involved, I want to be a part of
solving the problems, and who does not, so it has had, I think about rallying
people around leadership, rallying people about the problems, and what we’re going to fix in the world, and understanding what our
position is in the world, I think has been fairly galvanizing. Especially for me. – Perfect.
– Yeah. – That transitions as perfectly into, I think, what most of the live stream viewers are wondering. What are the roles that you’re hiring for? What are you looking for? Can you give us a sampling of the roles that you’re hiring for? Each of you, I think,
are kind of hiring, like, thousands of roles through Glassdoor. But are there particular
roles that stand out to you, Ashley, that you’re hiring
for right now, at Salesforce? – Absolutely, so we’re an enterprise software company, so for those of you that maybe aren’t too familiar,
that basically means that we’re selling software
to other businesses. A lot of our roles,
obviously, are technical. My team hires for distributed
systems engineers, and infrastructure, so for any distributed systems
(laughs) engineers, please, shoot me an email, but, you know, we also hire
for a multitude of things, and I’ve been at Salesforce a long time, and I’ve recruited for everything from somebody that works in our mail room, which is actually how I got
referred into Salesforce, all the way up to, like, Marc
Benioff’s personal security. I mean, we have such a
wide variety of roles, executive assistants, also customer support engineers, I mean, the list goes on and on. I would be probably in big trouble if I didn’t mention, we are doing a big sales hiring push. We have sales hubs all over the world, so, we hire people from, you know, entry level sales all the way up to account executives, and regional vice presidents, so, you know, we’re hiring for so many things. I just encourage you, if
you’re interested at all in learning more about
Salesforce, just to go to our careers website, salesforce.com/careers. – [Amy] Awesome. Claire, are there any particular roles that Kaiser is really
looking to fill right now? – [Claire] Well, similar to what Ashley said, we have a plethora of
positions in a variety of careers that we’re offering, so a majority of our positions are patient-facing, and
patient-focused positions. So about 70 percent of
the positions we fill are patient care-centered. But we do, also, have opportunities in IT, and quality, and we’re always looking for leaders, both clinical and non-clinical leaders to support our staff and lead our medical office
buildings, and hospitals. – Yes.
– I know who clicked the ad. (laughter) And we are recruiting
at Facebook, as well. Similar to my fellow panelists, we
are looking for roles across technical, non-technical. So, of course, software engineering, product engineers, we’re
looking for product designers, product managers, as well as, cause I
think there’s a tendency, as the panel before
said, for people to just think about technology,
and technical roles, but marketing, and sales
roles, HR, recruiting. We have roles within recruiting. And so, if you are interested, again, same thing, go to our careers website, most of our positions are posted there. We’re not just in the
Bay Area, we are looking in different markets, locations,
as well, around the US, and globally, so, just don’t limit yourself
to technical roles. We have roles across the cup again. – Okay, so, for each of your
companies, you are each best places to work,
according to Glassdoor, you get thousands of applications. Folks really want to work at your companies. So, say for example, we’ve got Alisha, she’s out there in
the world, and she’s applied. How can she sort of distinguish herself amongst the pack of a thousand applicants, or 200 applicants? What are you really looking for and how can folks really stand out? – Well, I think Scott and Doctor Chamberlain
really touched on that earlier on, and in including in your resume achievements that you’ve accomplished, and highlighting projects or
program that you’ve implemented, and I think that makes someone stand out. Definitely read the job description, and read the qualifications for the job, and make sure if you
have those qualifications and those skillsets, that you highlight that in your resume. Obviously, I think that will
definitely get your resume that second look. But highlighting those achievements and putting on there quantitative results of your achievements will definitely get you that call from a recruiter. – Yeah.
– A huge source of hiring, I’m sure at Kaiser, Facebook, as well as Salesforce, is referrals, and so, I actually counsel veterans that are transitioning from the military career into civilian life, and a huge part of my advice for them is if you’re really interested in a company, or you’re really interested
in a specific job, look at that company, look at LinkedIn, try to find people who maybe you either know, or maybe have
a similar background, too, like you both went to the same undergrad, or you both were in the Navy. Try to network with them,
and get that referral into that company. Most of the jobs I’ve had in my adult life have been through referrals, and I just feel that that
gives you that little bit of an extra edge, cause you have someone in that company that has your back. And even if you don’t know them, or even talked to them in a long time, you would be shocked
at how proud people are to work where they work, and how excited they are at the thought of maybe helping you come in. Doesn’t hurt that a lot of companies also have referral bonuses. (laughter) They have a little extra incentive. But referrals are a huge, huge way, so definitely leverage your network, do your research on
Glassdoor, see who you know, see, learn as much about
the company as you can, but also see who you
know within the company, and try to get in that way. – Now, how much does it matter, and does it matter, whether someone applies
for a job within the first 24 or 48 hours that it was posted? Does that really matter? Can you apply to a job that’s
been posted for 13 days, or 26 days? Or are you at the bottom of the stack? Where does that rank for you
all in you recruiting teams? – Sure, I’ll take a stab at it. (giggling) And, move fast is one of
our core values. (laughter) It’s one of our five
core values, so of course you want somebody who’s moving fast, and on the
go, and applied for it, but I do like what my other
panelists have said, is that you also wanna make sure that you’re connecting
the dots between what the job requirements are, and what the responsibility, responsibilities are that
are on the job description, to what’s your skills are. And drawing those connections,
and connecting those dots, because sometimes what
we’ll find is that people will quickly (snaps
fingers) apply for a role, or tend to do this whole
spray thing, and just apply to as many roles as possible. So, first, is just think
strong and hard about what are your skills, what
experiences have you had, but more importantly,
what are your skills, and how do those align with the
role that you applied for. We do tend to post jobs for some time, but when it gets to a point where there’s too many applications, or you have a lot of applications, you want to make sure
that you have some time to look through each of those applications before–
– Right. – –responding. But, yes, it does. It’s always good when you
know somebody’s moving fast, that they respond quickly, but it doesn’t mean that
if you wait two, three days that you’ll miss, you’ll
have a missed opportunity. So you wanna say focus on,
connect the dots between your background, your
resume, what you have, and the role that you’re applying for. – [Amy] So, it sounds
to me like you’re saying that it’s really important
for people to be informed candidates about your respective
companies before applying. So it’s almost like, as opposed to just seeing the job posting, and then applying in a minute, it’s almost like you want well-researched, engaged candidates who’ve looked at your profile before, who’ve engaged with you, who know a bit about, you
know, what your company has to offer, and then
when they see the role, really staying on top of it to apply. Is that correct?
– Absolutely. As far as, you know,
when I’m thinking about my ideal job applicant, recruiters are busy. I know everybody’s busy,
but recruiters, I mean, we are managing candidates, we’re
managing hiring managers, we’re managing our own managers, we’re managing our lives
outside of work, and so anything that people can do to take the guesswork out of does this person match the job? Amazing. I mean, look at the job description, and then if you really want that job, rewrite your resume, and
tweak your bullet points that it aligns exactly with
what the job description is asking for. And most job descriptions
will have things like the company’s core values, or the must-haves, and make sure,
you know, you don’t have to apply to a job where you
have 100% of the must-haves, but make sure that you’re
connecting the dots as much as you humanly can in your resume, for that job, to, before you apply, and then
that way, as a recruiter, if I’m skimming through
your resume, I’m like, “Huh. “Okay, this sounds familiar. “This sounds a lot like
what the hiring manager “was talking to me about
in that intake meeting “where I learned about all of the “qualifications that they
needed for this role,” so anything that people can do
to take that guesswork out is going to help us immensely. If we have to connect the dots,
we might not see something. And I made a transition out
of veterinary medicine into recruiting, and
trying to connect the dots between those two worlds was insane, but I had a friend who was in sales that sat down with me, and was like, “Well, you kind of did some
client management, there, “so you can, “you can actually re-write
this bullet point to say, “you worked with clients,
you know, on invoices, “in excess of $10,000,
like, put that in there.” And so, he helped me sort
of connect those dots, and if anybody out there
is listening, like, I, if you, if I can
make that jump, (laughs) you can connect the
dots between your skills and the job that you want. – Oh, so those transferable
skills, and telling that narrative, that you were
kind of talking about, telling that narrative in your resume and in your cover letter. So that’s, that’s impressive. Job seekers hate the black hole. Right, we click apply, and then we don’t hear back. (laughter) – Right.
– Yeah. – But, can you offer us some
insight, from your perspective, what’s happening on the
other side of things? What’s happening when an
application is, maybe, in the black hole, or at least sitting in the applicant tracking system? What are you all doing
on the, on the other side of the wall, if you will,
when you’re receiving tons of applications? What’s that process like? – Yeah, it, it can be
difficult to sort through the high number of submissions
of interest that we get. I mean, we get hundreds, if not thousands, a day, of submission of interest
for our positions, so as much as we’d like to engage
with each candidate, it’s, it can be hard, and it’s not a, it’s not an automated system. A lot of it is still manual. Where recruiters really
have to review the resumes, and determine whether or
not it’s a candidate that you have to move forward with. And so, I think, yeah, and with what everyone else was saying about spraying and praying, try not to do that. Really focus your search on what you’re interested in,
and what your skillsets are a bet, a best match for. That way you’ll have a greater chance of being called back from, by a recruiter. – Yeah. And, I completely agree, I think, and sometimes, I try to, you
know, when you speak to people and they say, “Hey, I’ve applied, “I haven’t heard back,” is just helping to understand,
to help them understand the number of applications that we receive on a daily basis. Which is why the points
that we’ve made about making sure that your resume is closely aligned to the
role that you’re applying for, because what a recruiter will do, as Scott and Doctor
Chamberlain have said, is you’ll spend about six, seven seconds, looking through a resume. And usually, what you’re
looking to do is to connect those dots, is I know
this role is looking for this, is looking for this skillset. Does this person have it? Whether it’s the summary that they have, whether it’s the skills that they have, you try to do that really fast, and hopefully the system,
and the tools that we have, will help us get through those candidates a lot faster. The other thing I will say is for high-volume areas,
at least at Facebook, what we’ve tried to do is to
resource those areas enough so that we have enough people
looking at the applications. And, by the way, you might
not be right for this role, but we really encourage our recruiters and our sources to be able to say, “Oh, they’re not right for my role, but “I’ll flip them over to you, this other “team–”
– Oh, wow! – “–on this other pipeline, where “I think they’ll be a match.” And a lot of the times, is months, weeks, years later, somebody
will be looking back, and say, “Oh wait, that person has a
very fascinating background. “We’re looking for that skillset.” So, whereas it might, you might not get an answer immediately, our
recruiters, once you’ve been in touch with a recruiter, you should expect somebody
to close the loop. Whether you’re advancing
in the process, or not, you should expect somebody
to close the loop because we aim for a good candidate experience. But I often say, please don’t spray everybody with your resume. (laughter) Find two to three roles
that you feel you are best positioned, and that your resume is best equipped to be able to apply for those roles, and
then take it from there. If it’s the whole mass, mass application that’s
a bit of a problem, yeah. – So, Scott and Andrew sort of
talked little bit about following up on an application. And I’m sure you all (laughs) have tried and true stories of people following up. Any hilarious moments
of people following up on a job search, or on an application,
or anything that sort of stands out as a way that someone either applied for a job, and followed up with you, either a taboo, or something (laughter) that was really great that paid off? – I’ve got a funny story.
– Okay! (laughter) Bring it, Ashley. – So, I, this was probably,
like, five years ago, and we had transitioned from, you know, paper
resumes, into digital, so it was definitely during that era, but I had a candidate that was
super interested in a role, she had already applied, we were figuring out sort of some details about the role, and within a day, she had mailed to me
a perfumed copy of her resume (laughter) to Salesforce, addressed to me, and I had never seen
paper mail at Salesforce, so it was like, this is so weird. And so I go, and it was
literally like, Elle Woods from Legally Blonde. (laughter) With a headshot. And I was like, this is different. You know, it definitely made
her stand out in my mind. She ended up not being the
right match for the role. It was for an executive assistant role, so that you kind of have
to have the right chemistry with that particular person, but, to this day, I still, actually,
every once in a while, will engage with her through LinkedIn or some other form of social media, and we just have kind of
kept tabs on each other, so– – [Amy] Wow, talk about
putting your best foot forward. (laughter) You stand out from the crowd. I remember when I was looking to, to get an
internship, and I applied to the Source Magazine, back in the day, and I had submitted my application, and, again, it was a paper resume, but I had found, sort of,
this really beautiful turquoise paper to put it on, and like, a turquoise envelope, and, sure enough, I got the internship. Probably not because of
the turquoise (laughter) but she did say it stood out from, from the stack, and, yes that was, like,
20 years ago. (laughter) Now, don’t judge me. But it’s just to say that, like, you go the extra mile for the
job that you really want, and I think in today’s, you know, job market, it’s really
about that cover letter. And really using that as
the distinguishing space, and the resume as that
distinguishing space. Would you agree? – Definitely.
– Yeah. – [Claire] I do agree, and, especially, what Doctor Chamberlain, and Scott had said, it’s really your, your time to exemplify the achievements that you’ve accomplished, and it’s, and I, I especially
agree with the communication and showing your written
communication skills. Because a lot of that is lacking, right, in today’s, in today’s world. And so, I think the
ability to write a good, articulate, cover letter is definitely
helpful to your application. – Yeah. And I do emphasize substance over style. You can perfume it, (laughter) you can have it on turquoise– – Right, but if it’s not meaty– – That’s right–
– –the right bullet points. – Exactly, what’s the substance– – And, again, it’s an opportunity
to sell yourself, right? I mean, a resume, it’s
hard for people, I think, sometimes, to sell themselves. And I think, sometimes, when
they get in their resume mode they look at their old job
descriptions, and they’re like, I did this, this, and this. And that’s great, but, like, how does that relate to
the job that you want? And so, the cover letter,
again, is your sales pitch. It’s your elevator pitch. You’ve got that 30 seconds in
the door with the recruiter, pitch it. – Absolutely. Now, for each of your companies, what are some of the
common interview questions that they can expect from either yourself,
or that hiring managers that you work with? What are some of those really tough, juggernauts that you’re asking candidates who come through your doors? – Well, I don’t think we
really have tough questions. – Ah! – I feel, of course, we’re a very patient-focused, and patient-centered, and wanna make sure that we’re
providing exceptional patient care, so, definitely we’re gonna ask
questions that focus on customer service, and service-orientation. A lot of our question are
behavioral-based questions, because we wanna hear examples of the work that you’ve done. We wanna hear your ability to work in a large setting,
or work in a large, complex organization, because we are, ourselves, a large,
complex organization, so we wanna see your ability to thrive in that type of environment. And so, definitely,
behavioral-based questions that are going to assess those skills, are the types of questions we ask. – Okay.
– Yeah. – And you’re increasingly finding, you would find, you know,
the gotcha questions, like– – Right, the tricky ones. (laughter) – –where you can see them fumbling, you seem them trying, you see, the gotcha questions really don’t get to what is the person’s
competency, what can they do. And so, leading to what’s more
structured interviews, that you ask multiple
candidates, will sort of yield unbiased responses. Or assessments, is that when you’re asking the same questions, to
this, all the candidates, for the same role, you’re gonna get to a
better result, because then you’re assessing them based on the questions that you asked. But I do find questions that align, when asking questions, it’s
what do you do on your best day at work? And to me, that speaks to
what are their strengths, what do they like to do, what are their skills, or when is it that you
have lost track of time in the best possible way? It means that you’ve been doing something that you really enjoy, and went like, ooh, wait. How–
– (laughter) The day’s flown by.
– Right, the day’s flown by so, those are the times that you really get to what motivates somebody,
where that somebody really get engaged, and get really involved that they don’t realize what the time is, or, a question about how does your team contribute
to Facebook’s mission, and values, and to me, that is about understanding how the
different parts of Facebook feed the mission, or help the mission and the values that we are about. But, usually trying to
get to what motivates somebody, by asking what has been your best day at work, and what were you doing,
when you were doing that. – Okay.
– Yeah. – I think, also, people
sometimes tend to maybe not prepare as much
for a recruiter screen, and to be honest, that can
be a pretty tricky place. – Yeah.
– And, something that I always tell my friends when they’re interviewing, recruiters really wanna know why are you looking at this new job? Why are you looking to
leave your old company? Are you running towards something? Are you running from something? And you, I’m sure, you two know, as much as I do, you know, sometimes you ask that question,
people really flail, and sometimes they go
into this negative spiral about how the company’s not doing well, or their manager, something something, and this happened, and–
– It’s really exposing– – Yeah, this org change
happened, and then I’m like, “Oh, and org change happened there. “Hmm, interesting.” (laughter) Maybe I should start
calling those engineers. But. (laughter) – Poacher.
– Yeah. (laughter) Just kidding. No, but really. (laughter) Okay, so, you know, I
mean, I think figuring out why, what are you doing,
where, what’s motivating this shift in your life? Your job is, obviously, where you spend the majority of your time, so, what’s causing that shift? And so that’s a big one. I think, also, as you mentioned, it’s really, what motivates you, and
recruiters have this whole always be closing sort of
mentality, like in sales, where I wanna know from the get-go if I get to the finish line with you, what is it going to take to close you? And so, where do you sit at in the commute? And I feel like a lot of times people might be, like, if I’m talking to
a candidate in San Jose, that’s interviewing for
a San Francisco position, in the beginning they’re gonna be like, “Oh, yeah, a two hour
commute, no problem!” (laughter) And then we
get to the offer stage, and all of a sudden, that commute is a really big problem,
so I think, to an extent, being truthful with yourself,
as well as the recruiter, in the beginning, so that that way we can have those conversations to really figure out what works for you, we can
talk to the hiring manager about, you know, different, maybe, like, remote setups, or things like that, so, you know, I think just
being prepared to kind of answer those questions to
the recruiter truthfully, but also, kind of have an idea of what’s really motivating
this big change in your life before you go into that
recruiter call, because I can tell if someone’s lying to me, and I’m sure you two can, as well, from a mile away. (laughter)
– Yeah. – So, when you’re in interviews, and you all have
been hiring managers yourself, what’s the best question,
or what’s something that really stands out, to you, that a candidate has asked? A question, because, yes, you all are supposed
to ask the questions, but you hope that candidates
ask questions back, as they should. Is there, has there been
a memorable question that someone has asked? Or a very memorable exchange hat
you’ve had with a candidate? Can you share? Liz, you look like you
have something (laughter) very good on your mind! I love it!
– I do, I really do like when you get different
questions, and it’s, you know, inspiring questions,
or insightful questions, which means they’ve been
doing their homework, and not just the surface homework that every one of us can do, but you know they’ve gone deep, a little bit more nuanced
with their questions. So, when people ask questions about, hey, Facebook has been in the
news the last 12 months, tell me a little bit
about what’s going on, and allowing me to give
my perspective on things. When people ask the question
I said earlier about how does your team, we’re in recruiting, I’m on the business side of things, is how is your team
contributing to Facebook’s mission and values? Or, when somebody’s asking, is where do you think I can have,
what’s your biggest problem? And where do you think I
can have the most impact? And that kind of stuff that is not your, so, what is your. (laughter) – Can you tell me about your day-to-day? And you’re like, my
day-to-day is not yours. – Yeah, right. (laughter) You know when they’ve taken
time to do the research on just a recruiter, they’ve
taken time to read about what’s going on with
Facebook, what we’re about, our product, that can
be, that is a whole other conversation get started. And it also exposes you
to who the person is, or who the individual is, so, I think the insightful, thought out, well-researched questions that show that the person has really gone above and beyond, and
differentiates themselves. You know?
– Claire, has there ever been a question or an exchange with a candidate that has really stuck out to you? – Well, a candidate, one time, asked me at the end of our call how long I’d been with Kaiser, and what, what kept me there. And I thought that was
a really great question. I think it’s important for
prospective candidates to ask current employees why they like working
at an organization, and what keeps them there, because, hopefully, that’s in line
with what you’re looking for. In an organization. – Ashley, anything stand
out to you? (laughter) – Well, Salesforce, as
I mentioned, a big value is the Ohana, and volunteering,
and that piece of it, and so, I’ve had candidates come in to me as a hiring manager,
and they’ve researched Salesforce, they’ve looked on the website, and they’ve asked me, you know, what have you done to volunteer? And so, that way, I can share a
little bit of my story, but it also shows that
they’ve done the research, and I know that Scott mentioned research earlier in the quickfire,
and I think that that’s such a huge, huge proponent of, or portion, of job, of interviewing. Job searching.
– Yeah, it is, it is. – Wonderful. Okay, so, we are counting down, we’ve
got a few more minutes left. So I’m gonna, I’m gonna shoot you over some rapid fire questions.
– Okay. – So you’re gonna spit it back. (laughter) So we’ll go down the line, and, you know, feel free to jump off when you feel like it. So, what is the best interview answer that you’ve ever heard? – Oh.
– I’ve, I’ve asked somebody, tell me something about
you that surprises me? I grew up in a firehouse,
so not much does. – What!
– And the candidate said, basically, that he was in
the Superbowl Halftime Show with Madonna, and I was like, what! – No.
– And he ended up getting the job, so. (laughter)
– Cool! – That’s a pretty cool one! Best interview answer that you ever heard? – Well, mine was more a
situation than an answer. – Okay.
– I was screening a candidate over the phone, and I hear
his kids run in the room screaming, “The dog pooped in
the other room!” (laughter) And he managed to calmly, calm the kids down, he cleaned up the mess,
and he was still (laughter) answering my question.
– Wow. – And he did it very well,
too, he was very calm throughout the whole time–
– Way to show off his multitasking–
– I know! And I felt like he really showed his multitasking,
and ability to stay calm under pressure, so it was great. (giggling) – Oh, I can’t top that. (laughter) – That’s good. – All right, for each
of you, cover letter. Is it a do, or a don’t? – It’s a, I do–
– It depends. – Oh.
– To me I think it depends. – Okay!
– Cause I think there’s some roles that are really high volume, where your resume speaks for itself. And your resume will tell your story. And then there are other
roles where, I think, the cover letter, as the
panel before had said, helps to tell your story, if people can’t really
quite differentiate you from the, you know, from your resume. So I think it really, it depends on the role
that you’re applying for. – Okay. – Your resume, in my
mind, is tantamount, but I feel like the cover letter, it’s not gonna hurt you as long as you don’t have any grammatical errors– – No. (laughter)
– –and you are using it to sell yourself. And you’re not just listing
off a laundry list of the things that you’ve done in your life. – Absolutely. So, what is your best
piece of career advice that you adhere to, personally? – Don’t take it personally. I remember one of my
former bosses said to me, “You take it too personally,” like, “You need to stand back from the feedback, “look at the feedback, “be objective about it, so “don’t take it personally,”
so I always take that with me. Don’t take it personally,
think it through, be objective, and not subjective about it, and then take it from there. So, for me, it’s don’t take it personally. – Okay.
– I take it all the time. – That’s great, I’m gonna
use that. (laughter) – It’s like, got it, check. Ashley, do you have any personal
career advice that you’ve, like, hold on to? – I do, and this one is kind of a funny-sounding
one, but bear with me. So, I got this, actually,
from my VP of Tech Recruiting, and it’s kind of an old-fashioned saying, so it’s a little out-dated,
don’t judge me, but, if you are going to come to me and tell me that there’s a gorilla in my office, you better come with a banana or a gun. (laughter) Which just
means, and it sounds harsh, but it means come to me with a solution. Or at least, have thought about some
possible solutions. As a manager, I’m so happy to
work through that with you, but, like, you’ve gotta at least give me something to work with, so, that’s a big one. – That was some amazing tips and insight. I feel like we could keep
going, for hours and hours, digging deep on all of your companies, and sort of recruiting practices, but I wanted to say thank you so much– – Thank you.
– –for being here today, we really appreciate it, so much. To all of you watching a big, big thank you. We hope that you have more information now than you had before on how to find a job in a
company that fits your life. Don’t forget that Glassdoor
is the perfect place to search and apply to jobs. We’ve got millions of
the latest job postings, plus reviews, and salary information. So thank you so much. With that, happy job hunting, and we’ll see you on Glassdoor. Have a good evening.
– Thank you.

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