Modernizing Federal Career Transition Programs to Enable Career and Organizational Goals

Modernizing Federal Career Transition Programs to Enable Career and Organizational Goals


Dr Sydney Heimbrock: Good afternoon, and welcome
to this webcast on modernizing Federal career transition programs. Today’s session is about
how non-Federal organizations enable career and organizational goals during times of transition. My name is Dr. Sydney Heimbrock. I am Deputy
Associate Director for strategic workforce planning in the office of personnel management’s
employee services division. Employee services provides leadership guidance and technical
assistance across the Federal Government on topics of concern for managers, supervisors
and the HR community. The purpose of today’s event is to continue helping Federal agencies
and HR modernize career transition services. Why are we doing this series? Because almost
every agency is undergoing workforce re-shaping efforts, whether as a natural result of increased
retirements or reorganizing toward new mission requirements. Career transition programs are an important
tool that agencies can use to help employees make informed choices and manage their careers
through these changes. Employees want and expect their organizations to help them manage
their careers. If we are asking our current and future talent
to give their best, we need to demonstrate intangible ways that we care about our people.
Our last session was held in August of 2013 and focused on model career transition programs
inside the federal government. In the meantime, we had furloughs, which delayed
our second installment in these series, but we’re delighted today to bring to you a session
on models from state government, the private sector, and military organizations, as well
as insights from academic institutions that study workforce transition issues and identify
best practices for helping our workforce manage transition. We do encourage you to participate actively
in today’s webcast by sending your questions to the following email address: [email protected]
Again, that’s “s” as in Sam, “w” “p” as in Paul, [email protected] We will do our best to answer your questions
throughout this event, time permitting. If we do not get to your question during today’s
event, my team will respond to you quickly afterwards. Today’s Workforce Restructuring
Event covers three important topics. First, why client-centered career transition
services are critical for employees, organizations, in the economy, as a whole, what best practices
we have identified across the globe for pre-layoff career transition services, and some of the
challenges we can expect to encounter as we attempt to provide effective career transition
services. I hope you enjoy today’s event and participate
actively, and I would like now to hand the podium over to Renee Singleton who is group
manager for talent management within the Center for Strategic Workforce Planning. Renee will
introduce our guest speakers and their topics. Thank you. Renee Singleton: Good afternoon, everyone.
It is my pleasure to introduce to you our first of four distinguished speakers. Our
first speaker is Miss Anne Conyers. Miss Conyers is the deputy director of the Transition to
Veterans Program Office within the Department of Defense. As a deputy, Miss Conyers represents and advises
the director and the assistant secretary of defense for resources and force management
on matters relating to the transition of service members from the military service careers
into the civilian workforce. She assists in directing the oversight and
policy guidance involving transition assistance, including collaborating of other federal agencies,
military service private sector partners as well. She is heading the effort to change
the culture and experience service members receive while transitioning into the civilian
workforce. Prior to joining TBPO, Miss Conyers was a
senior human resources specialist in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for civilian personnel
policy. She provide a policy guidance and direction on issues and projects concerning
the civilian workforce which includes reduction in force, recruitment, staffing, benefits,
retention, and sustainment. Previously, she served as the chief of policy
and programs within Headquarters Army Material Command G1. Leading a team of Human Resource
Professionals, she had oversight and responsibility for a number of the commands diverse and critical
civilian personnel programs to include performance management, civilian award, staffing, compensation,
workforce management, and mobilization/deployment. We’ll now share her presentation on transition,
goals, plans, successes, referred to as GPS for military service members. You may now
begin. Anne Conyers: Thank you very much. The program
we’re going to talk about pertains to military service members who are leaving active duty
service either after finishing their term or after retiring from the service. Back in
August 2011, President Obama had visited the navy yard here in Washington D.C. and talked
to the audience about his concerns on veterans’ unemployment. During that time, he asked the Department
of Defense to partner with the Department of Veteran Affairs and re-design the Transition
Assistance Program. The Transition Assistance Program had been in force for over 20 years,
and was strictly a voluntary program that service members were encouraged to participate
in prior to separating from the service, but it was not mandatory. Currently, the Transition Assistance Program
is transitioning approximately 250,000 service members on an annual basis. It covers 206
military installations across the United States and across the world. The new re-design program
is from a discontinuous source of activities to a very cohesive mandatory training. Title ten was changed in 2012 in November,
to make Transition Assistance Mandatory. A service member must participate in the program
unless he’s but identified exempt for certain portions, and we’ll talk about that later. We decided to rename the program Transition
GPS or Transitions, Goals, Plans, Success, because we’re trying to illustrate the image
or the pathway towards civilian life and civilian employment. It’s a modular curriculum that
we designed. The intent of the curriculum is that you would
do pieces of it as it would apply to your career progression in the military and then
toward your civilian. You’re not doing it all in the last 90 days or in the last 12
months of separation, but you would do it at timely points across your military life
cycle. It also helps the service member to develop
critical job skills and realization of their valued skills. Part of the realization is
we want the service member to realize not only do you know how to weld or be an aircraft
mechanic, but you also bring to the civilian environment some great leadership skills,
some good problem-solving skills. You give some very good decision-making techniques.
You know how to lead small groups, you know how to lead large groups, order supplies,
do logistics, all those kinds of things. Those are some valued skills that oftentimes a service
member takes for granted that they’re part of their toolbox of assets or resources they
would bring forward to an employer or a potential employer. We also help them to prepare for the transition
from the military budget or the military resources they have in their pay and then their benefits
and entitlements to what they would be available to them when they transition into civilian
life. If they pick a career, they want to be a police officer, then what does an average
police officer get paid in the geographic location they get paid, what does it cost
to live in that area, are you having other responsibilities like childcare, education,
those kind of things. They can plan out a budget and be more prepared
for that transition from a certain standard of living to hopefully an equal level standard
of living in which they want to pursue after they leave the military. We provide them a
session on that. Then we also do a critical military occupational
called the crosswalks. If you have a service member whose military career is an aircraft
mechanic and now he wants to go work here or she wants to go for Southwest Airlines
as an aircraft mechanic, you would do the level of experience and certifications and
training that you had in the military and compare to what those requirements would be
to work in the civilian world doing that same occupation. We go through that and then do a gap analysis
of what’s the difference between what those military skills and what those skills are
that a civilian requires to have that job in the civilian world like for Southwest Airlines. We developed a curriculum under workshops
with career readiness standards. You always hear the military,”Its ready”, “We’re ready
to fight”, “We’re ready to train”, “We’re ready to move”. We decided that we would need
to stick with that mantra and go Career Ready. To be Career Ready you have to meet certain
standards and we’ll talk about those standards as we move a little further ahead. Finally
you see the Capstone, and the Capstone is where leadership verifies that, that Service
member is indeed ready for the new career. This slide here, Transition GPS Curriculum
is an overview. This is the curriculum that was designed as we talked about in a modular
effort. You would do pre-separation counseling. What pre-separation counseling is, is a session
a service member goes through, talks about the health that they’ll be entitled to, they’ll
talk about the new affordable care Act that just went into effect, they’ll talk about
any education benefits, any VA benefits potentially that they would have available to them, do
some discussions about their transition, make sure that they are ready for those transitions,
that they’re not having any challenges or problems. It’s a checklist and it takes about an hour
and a half to two hours to go through all of those things with the Service member and
as they go through those things they would identify to their career counselors or to
their transition counselors what things that the two of them have agreed that they need
to help them to smoothly transition into civilian life. Let’s say that the person is talking about,
they want to go to college when they get out. We’ll talk to them about having curriculum
information or provided an information on education and also from the VA to talk about
their Post-9/11 GI benefits or Montgomery Bill benefits if Montgomery Bill is the benefits
that they have. Every Service member is required by statute,
entitled 10, to participate in pre-separation counseling. That’s 250,000 one-on-one discussions. The Core Curriculum is a set standardized
curriculum. Now every services presenting the curriculum as their culture defines and
you got to see that across the different federal agencies and all our different cultures. Take that into defense and then break that
down into each of our services to include the Coast Guard and they present it in their
cultures. What we have is a standardized learning objectives, and standardized outcomes. Those are what are required for every service
to present. How they present it or the language that they use to present it can be adjusted
based on the needs they have, to give them a transition overview so that they know the
overall effort that’s going to move forward. The MOC Crosswalk we just talked about, it’s
about a two to three hour module, its Internet-based. It also gives them a tangible outcome which
is a gap analysis between the career that they currently have in the military and potential
careers that would match it. It will also show you odd career, let me say. If you are an Infantrymen and you decide you
want to be a doctor, a gap analysis is probably rather thick in what you need to do to get
to be a doctor. It would not at all ever discourage you to do that effort, it would just show
you the pathways of the potential requirements it would to get there. We do a little bit on resilient transitions.
We talk about PTSD, talk about sexual assault, we talk about suicide — all of those types
of hard-to-discuss efforts, are discussed during that module and then we also provide
avenues or ways in which Service members can get help, currently, while they’re still on
active duty and also we talk to them about those opportunities for assistance under the
other federal agency programs like the Department of Veterans’ Affairs would be one of them. Then we do the budget, you and I already have
discussed and its about 4 to 6 Hours for that session. The Department Of Labor has a 3-day workshop.
In the 3-day workshop, they talk about how to write a job resume, they talk about how
to fill out a job application, they talk about how to look at geographic areas and see what
kind of jobs are available in those areas, they also talk about how to seek federal employment. Office of Personnel Management has an actual
module within that 3-day workshop in which they provide information on how to apply for
federal jobs. They also talk about USAR, and they talk about the VEOA and the VRA opportunities. In addition to the dual workshop, they also
talk about the American Job Centers and the things that the Department of Labor offers
to service-members as they transition into civilian life to include resume writing, job
applications. All those kinds of things are also offered to veterans at the American Job
Centers as they are offered to all civilians in the United States, either way. The Department Of Veterans’ Affairs does a
6-hour module in which they talk about all the benefits and entitlements a service member
would get from the VA. Talks about the Post-9/11 GI Bill, talks about health claims, talks
about home loans, talks about some family programs and opportunities, vocational education,
occupational health opportunities, that kind of stuff. They also provide an opportunity to do one-on-one
counseling with VA counselors there, would be scheduled after the classes across the
time-frame that that service member has through active duty service and also the opportunities
that they would have after they separate from service. The one thing that a service member does also
is an individual transition plan. A Service member, after they have completed the pre-separation
counseling or as they’ve decided that they’re going to transition, they would fill out a
document that lays out a transition plan on what they need to do to get to where they
want to go. They’ll fill out those plans using the modules
and curriculum here based on discussions that they have with their career counselors or
with their transition counselors on the transition information. They’ll also have an opportunity
to decide which career or which path they want to go. Lets say you the going to leave the military
and you decide you want to go to college, well we have a 2-day curriculum called Assessing
Higher Education and you see that under those tracks. You would participate in that, in
addition to the core curriculum we just went over. That 2-day track will teach a service member
how to decide what kind of college they want to go to, what college degrees that they want
to potentially pursue, it will talk about the experience that they already have in the
military and how that will transfer to the college that they’re talking about attending,
it will talk about for-profit and non-profit universities and colleges, it talks about
the application the process and it talks about the references and those kinds of things. The important part of that is it needs to
be timely. I don’t want a service member to go to Assessing Higher Education in October,
thinking that they can go to Ohio State then in January. That’s just not realistic. You
have to have planned that. Let’s say in a four-year enlistment, a service
member decides they want to do college when they get out of service, probably at the second
year, or between the second and third year, they should attend that Assessing Higher Education
class. That way, they can get all their application
paperwork done. They can get their references. They can do their student loans if they need
them. They can do the Post 9/11 GI Bill, those kinds of things. The very important piece is that we’re giving
them the tools to be able to make these decisions and make good decisions on their career and
their future. The same concept works for the Career Technical Training Track. That track does almost the same thing as the
Assessing Higher Education Track, except it focuses on technical schools, certifications,
licensures. It helps them find good, creditable resources for those kinds of things. It also
helps them to find out what kinds of jobs require what kind of licensures and certifications. Sometimes a service member might be misled
to think they need a certification in one particular career field to be able to perform
that career, and it’s not always true. We try to show them how to be able to cipher
that out. Also it talks about the differences in the
state licensures and state credentialing. Every state has its unique requirements. The final additional track they talk about
is entrepreneurship. The Small Business Administration stepped up and asked to be part of this in
helping service members so they can start their own business. After World War II, more than 40 percent of
veterans started their own business. That’s how they re-boosted the economy. Using that
concept and the thought of what President Obama was talking about, with unemployment
and boosting the economy, the Small Business Administration said, “Hey, we want to take
part in this.” We do a two-day workshop with the Small Business
Administration. They provide the education curriculum to the service member and lay out
what it would be to start a small business. All the requirements, how to make those decisions,
the time frame you would need, and loans, that kind of stuff. At the end of the entrepreneurship class,
you don’t walk away with a tangible item like you do in the other two tracks, where you’d
walk away with a college application form, or knowing what college you potentially want
to attend. What it does is it gives you information you
need to make good decision, if you want to start a small business. If you find that you
do, the Small Business Administration then will enroll you in their eight-week course. That eight-week course that a service member
participates in, he can participate as a service member or as a civilian. It is open to all
civilians also. They’ll take that course, and at the end they’ll have a mentor who has
a business similar to the one they want to start. They’ll also have a business plan. They’ll
have a counselor from the SBA who will help them to do the small business loan process
and all that kind of stuff. It’s a great opportunity for someone who’s
looking to start a small business. It’s also a great opportunity for a service member to
maybe do one or two of these tracks. Maybe they’re not sure they want to start a small
business, or they’re not sure they want to go to college, or maybe they’re going to start
a small business after college. Information is never poor or a bad thing.
They’ll do the education track, no they’re going to college, then go take the Small Business
Administration track, know what it’s going to take to start their own small business
when they finish school. The final event is the capstone. We talked
a little bit about that. That’s where they validate all of these things. If you go to the other side in key outcomes,
that slide showed you that from the curriculum track, we wanted to make sure that you weren’t
just going to class and hearing information, then you leave and don’t retain anything,
or you don’t have anything tangible to come away with it. Under the core curriculum, we identified those
things that you’re going to leave with when you leave those sessions. We talked about…You
have that MOC crosswalk; we talked about that budget, that individual transition plan. When you leave the VA benefits class, you’re
going to be enrolled in the eBenefits website. Every service member enrolls in that site,
and that’s how they get information about their benefits and entitlements. It also is
how VA is fed information that a service member is enrolled. The Department of Labor Workshop you see there
in the center shows you, you leave that class with how to do…At least you have master
started resume. Everybody knows it’s really hard to write a resume in three days. We’re teaching them the tools and how to do
that, and how to put that information in, what’s the right kind of verbiage. It also
provides other resources so they can get additional help after if they still want to complete
finishing that resume, or they’ll leave with a couple of job applications filled out. Some applications you still fill out the standard
form. Some of them you do the OPM; load the resume kind of effort in applying for a federal
job. Assessing Higher Education, the career technical
track and the entrepreneurship track there on the right side shows you those outcomes
that we’ve already discussed. If you look to the last slide, I talk about
the military life cycle for TAP. What we want to do is instead of pushing transition assistance
in the last 12 months of a service member’s career, we want to push it from assession
to separation. When you first come in the military, you’ll
enroll in the eBenefits with the VA. You’ll likely have a discussion on your Post 9/11
benefits. You might talk with your career counselor that, “Here and here, I’m going
to do one enlistment, serve my time, and utilize those GI benefits for education. Those kinds of things, we want to see across
the life cycle, so you’re getting the right training at the right time so you get the
most benefit from that training. In 2014, we’re putting the military life cycle
across all the services. Every service is unique. For example, the department of Air
Force retains about 70 percent of their airmen. That is their life cycle plan, where the Marine
Corps only retain between 20 and 30 percent of Marines. Their life cycles are completely
different. Their investments in those services are different. We want those service members to get those
benefits at the right time. We look at key touch points across a service member’s career,
when they first come in, when they have opportunity for enlistment, re-enlistment when they have
a change in duty location, maybe a change in your occupational code or your leadership
level. All those periods of time during your military
life cycle should indicate some thoughts of transitioning, “No when I leave, what do I
want to do?” Those decisions probably are changing across your life cycle. We want service
members to be thinking about that as they move along. How we’re going to try to get them to think
about that is they’re going to do individual development plans for their military career.
When they decide to transition, they’ll transition that information into their transition plan
and how they utilize those skills. It’s been a big endeavor. We’ve spent a lot
of resources and effort. We’re doing it in conjunction with the Department of Veterans
Affairs, the Department of Labor, the Small Business Administration, the Office of Personnel
Management, and the Department of Education. We’re getting ready to sign a memorandum of
understanding across all five agencies on our transition efforts. We are a model for
many organizations for an inter-agency collaboration, that we are all in step. We meet weekly to
discuss implementation and to ensure that we are all in step in all of the things that
we’re doing in transition. Our resources are used wisely. We’re not duplicating efforts. We’re working towards a single portal with
the Department of Labor and all of us in collaboration on that effort. We’re also doing a cross-agency
goal with the White House on meeting requirements for all service members to be participating
in transition assistance. Been a big change for me from the civilian
world of more than 20 years in civilian personnel, but a welcome re-look at something under Title
10 instead of Title 5 for a little while, and look at things from a different way. Thank you for the opportunity to present our
program. I welcome any questions. Woman: Actually, Anne, we do have one question
that did come in for you. What metrics are you using to measure your success in meeting
the long-term outcomes of this program? Anne: We have two metrics right now we’re
using to measure success. We have our compliance requirements under Title 10, which mean a
service member has to do that pre-separation counseling we talked about, the Department
of Labor workshop, and the VA benefits brief. They must by statute do that. That’s what
I’m reporting as our cross-agency goal, so that’s one of our metrics. We have some future metrics that we’re going
to be looking at it. We’re evaluating our evidence-based curriculums and making sure
that we’re meeting the needs and the requirements of the service members as they transition
into the civilian workforce. Woman: Thank you. This was a really good overview
on the transition GP after military service members. Thank you so much. We may have some
additional questions as we go through today’s webcast. Anne: All right. Thank you. Woman: What I’m going to do now is transition
to our next presenter who’s actually joining us virtually. Her name is Miss Tanya Calbert
and she’s actually filling in for Miss Theresa Applegarth who was originally scheduled to
present but could not be with us today. Tanya manages multiple projects for the Ohio
Department of Job and Family Services, Office of Workforce Development, including Ohio Means
Jobs. Ohio Means Jobs was developed in partnership with monster.com. It is the state’s premier
resident and job bank. It was the first public-private partnership
of its kind in the nation. In 2012, Ohio won a 12 million dollar grant from the U.S. Department
of Labor to redesign and enhance Ohio Means Jobs. Tanya is leading the redesign. The new
website will provide job search and job training assistance that is currently only available
in person at county employment centers. In addition to Ohio Means Jobs, Miss Calbert
oversees ohioheretohelp.com and ohiomeansveteransjobs.com. Miss Calbert has over 18 years of workforce
development experience in both the private and public sectors. Now, let’s hear from Miss Calbert, who is
working hard to provide transition services for the state of Ohio. Right now what I’d
like to do before we actually have Tanya speak is transition to a photo so our audience can
relate to our presenter. I believe the photo is up. Tanya, can you hear me? Tanya Calbert: Yes. Woman: Great, I’m going to turn it over to
you now. Thanks. Tanya: Good afternoon everyone. If we could
go ahead and start at the first slide. I just wanted to let you know that as she said, we
have been in partnership with monster.com, now for about three or four years. With our WISH grant, this enhancement is going
to focus mostly on our individuals for the next couple of years. Next slide please. From
the beginning of the transition, our individuals are able to just come to one place and actually
determine that what they’re looking for as far as services, throughout our workforce
development community. Instead of having to do their workforce services
in a physical brick-and-mortar place, we tried to make them standardized services across
the board in a virtual environment. We give the same options to our employers
as well. At the bottom, you’ll see that we actually have what we’re calling a wonder
wall. A lot of our marketing material will include those little icons so the individuals
will be able to see those icons and relate it back to a piece marketing material they
had. Next slide please. Our grant has determined
that we believe workforce development is broken out into four different areas, when it comes
to looking for careers. You can explore a career. You have to plan
for your career. You have to fund that career. You have to find it, eventually. We’ve decided
there are several different ways that we should allow our individuals to get to that ultimate
career. We have what we call a guided tour. From the
site, individuals just click on get started, and they would literally be walked through
step-by-step, all of the process of going through our pre-workforce development type
of items. We also allow an interactive guided tour and
I’ll show you a little bit of slides on those later on in the presentation. Next slide please. The third way we believe that a lot of the
individuals within our workforce development community come into our system, they don’t
necessarily need all of the pre-planning that some other individuals may need. We allow them literally just come in and just
jump to wherever they want to go. For instance, if all they want to do is come in and get
a budget calculator to determine what they actually need in their career, we allow them
to come right in. We allow them to jump around, to explore it,
to plan it, jump around the whole site, or as I said earlier, they can actually do a
guided tour or a virtually guided tour, in which they’ll have to enter in data. Next slide please. One of our main sections
of our site is based off regions within the state of Ohio. What we’ve done is taken our
88 counties within the state of Ohio. We’ve broken them down into sub-regions. We have the main six regions of Ohio, which
is Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo and then our Nelsonville region. Our
Nelsonville region is more of our Appalachian shell area. We allow each of the individual areas to come
into the system, post regional articles that’s geared right toward that community. We allow
the individuals to come into our system and say I’m only from Toledo. Only show me job fairs in the Toledo area.
Only show me workshops that are available in my area or only show me in demand occupations
in my area. What we’ve done is slightly different from the normal in demand occupations. We’ve
surveyed a couple thousand employers throughout the state of Ohio, through our off the workforce
transformation. We allow them to use that data to forecast
what our current Ohio employers are saying their in demand occupations are going to be
over the next year. We usually use DOL forecasted data. For this
system, we’re trying out allowing our employers to tell us what is there in demand occupations
projections over the next year to five years. We’re going to resurvey them every couple
of months just to keep the in demand list up to point, on par, and fresh in everybody’s
area. Individuals can come in here. If they, for some reason, are not sure what
part of the region that they are in, they’re able to put a zip code in and it takes them
to that region. They don’t have to know our government standardized regions. They can
come in and put in the zip code and reach the information that meets their needs. Next
slide please. Another feature that we have done in the system
is to allow individuals to not only come in and jump into all of the normal job searching,
posting resumes…all those items. We give them the ability to build what we’re calling
career plans. They can come and create a career plan based
on doing the industry search, or just by keywords. For example, they only know they want to be
a cook. They can come in and type “cook” into the keyword area and that would allow them
to pull up and start beginning a career plan. Next side please. Their career plans are built
off of what we have worked with our workforce community throughout the state of Ohio. We’ve
worked with and come up with what we call recommended activities. For each one of those,
explore it, plan it, fund it, find it sections, an individual can build their whole career
plan with recommended activities they can select, and we’ll tell them how to go about
doing it. Whether it’s finding a professional organization
or creating a budget calculator or anything like that. The individuals can create their
own career plan totally without selecting any of our pre-populated recommended activities. This allows them to put in their own notes,
give it a entry date to where this is the time that they have to have, maybe finding
out from a professional that’s on LinkedIn, what openings are available in a company that
they are interested in working with. They can put all of this into one place, build
their career plan and put it into their backpack, which is the founding foundation of this site.
It’s just one simple way for everyone to come in and have easy access to all the workforce
development needs. The career plans they are building from here
also be renamed. We automatically start them out based on the occupational name or the
ONET title they selected earlier, but it’s editable. They can architect four different ways and
name it four different titles. Maybe one is for starting of a pre-plan, and then the fourth
one is where they’re going to get their full architectural degree and move on to the actual
employment industry. Next slide. We have actually gone into another partnership
outside of just monster.com and we’ve partnered with the learning express. What this has provided to our individuals
within our system is now they have access to over a thousand assessment videos, training
guides, multiple language, English as a second language, work keys, PSAT, SAT, ACT, prep
scores and all of that. This has now allowed individuals in the state
of Ohio to have one username and one password to access not only their job search careers,
which they normally had with us, but now the same username and password accesses the learning
express library, where they can keep all their assessments and everything all in one place. It allows them to actually come in and do
our own, what we are calling core assess. In August of this year, our governor signed
a house bill requiring all of our unemployed who come through the system to register with
Ohio means jobs. As part of that registration and continuation
of their unemployment, they have certain items they must do throughout the history of their
unemployment claim. One of those items is taking certain assessments. As a state, we’ll
be able to say at any given time what’s the base level of the population that’s looking
for work within our state. These core assessments are the national WorkKeys
math, the WorkKeys reading, the WorkKeys locating information and a national computer basics
test. It’s just a basic computer literacy type of test. Individuals are able to print out certifications
and use those when they return to our brick-and-mortar stores to say I’ve passed all the pre-required
options. Now can you help me get into training? Next slide please. For those individuals who want to go ahead
and search for their own scholarships before they come to the workforce development community
and ask for governmental assistance when it comes to funding their educations, we have
partnered with fast web as well. This partnership allows our individuals to
come in and search for scholarships and add those to their backpack as well. It helps
them keep an overall goal of where they’re at in their career. We’ve also partnered with multiple agencies
throughout the state of Ohio and we’ve had a team come together to determine all the
different types of workforce development programs that would help fund an education. Individuals are also able to come right into
our site and search for those 91 programs that we’ve found across the state of Ohio,
print that out with context information, and then go right into the organization that provides
that funding. Next slide please. We have the ability for individuals to have
their career plans pre-populated into their calendar. Any job fairs or events they’re
registered for throughout the state will be on one calendar as well. They also have the ability to go ahead and
self-create items. These items can be pushed right onto their calendar that’s right in
their backpack within our system. Next slide please. Of course we’ll allow the individuals to do
job searching. One of the things that you can do in our system is once they search for
a job, they can click a save search option. They can save that job to their backpack. This allows them to really be able to manage
everything that’s going on with the job that they’ve applied for. They can actually put
notes in, comments about who they interviewed with, whether or not they were hired, whether
or not they only sent the application in and so forth and so on. Next slide please. Another item that we’ve
added with our new [inaudible 0:42:04] is the ability for individuals to come in, upload
non-resume items. We allow them to upload 15 different types of documents that can be
in multiple formats. For example, they have a degree that they
want to make a copy of and have sitting there, so at the drop of a dime, they can forward
on to an employer or just have an iCloud place to keep all their workforce development tools
in one easy simple place. We give them sample letters of cover letters
and follow-up letters. They can put pretty much anything in the document area. We just
recommend no CPI type of items in there. Next slide please. One of the items that our workforce community
has consistently told us across the state, is that individuals really need to have a
more realistic view of what they truly need to earn. One of the biggest tools in our system
today is the budget calculator. Next slide. In the budget calculator, we allow the individuals
to come in and enter in their true monthly expenses, including their housing, their utilities,
food, loans, transportation, clothing and all of that. We give them the ability to look up the housing
in the area as well as transportation. If maybe they’re in one part of the state and
thinking about moving to another part of the state, maybe for educational needs or just
to look for work, we give them an idea of how much it will cost in other counties. Once they’ve completed all of that information,
we tell them…Next slide please. Once they’ve entered all of their information into the
budget calculator, they get an estimate of what they truly need to make. We call that their target salary. Then, they’re
actually able to search for jobs based off of the target salary they entered in based
on their budget. We give them a list of actual in demand occupations
first based on, like I said earlier, our previous in demand occupations for employers within
the state of Ohio. If they’re logged into the system, they’ll
actually receive the in demand occupations for their region first, and then in demand
occupations for other regions later on. Next slide please. Now, the next tool that we allow our users
to use, and we think it’s a really good tool for them, is their career profile. A lot of
individuals we’ve found are not really sure exactly what they want to do. It’s almost like; you tell your kids when
you’re younger, “What do you want to be when you grow up.” We’ve found a lot of our adult
community really doesn’t know what they want to be and where their skills lay at. In their career profile, we allow them to
come in, take a 60 question assessment. It gives them a recommendation of what occupations
they would be good on. They can search by industry if they know what
industry they want to work in, or they can do a keyword search to get to that as well.
Next slide please. However, if they’ve taken the 60 question
assessment, we’re actually able to break it down on what type of personality traits are
they focusing on in their career. Whether they’re conventional, artistic, social, et
cetera. They are able to then print this out of course.
They can also go ahead and, based off of their 60 questions they’ve answered, go ahead and
view the occupations that are associated with answers they just provided. Once they provide those questions and do the
view occupations…Next slide please; You’ll see this comes right to the same type of in
demand occupation long list that we have if they had just did it based on their budget. It comes in in demand order and comes in not
in demand order. The same results can come up based on whether they come through the
budget or whether they come through the career profile or however they come through there.
Next slide please. The individuals are actually able to come
in and then view information regarding that career they have matched up to. They can look
at it and see of course the work activities associated with it, the educational levels
associated with it. I apologize, I should have said this at the
beginning, we are in partnership with DOL on this as well. The data in the background
is part of an API feed from the department of labor. They are able to come in and look at some
videos associated with that occupation. If it’s a youth coming in, you’re able to give
them a good idea of what the true occupation looks like. There able to create a career plan from this
way. They can find training providers or they can just look for jobs straight from there.
Next slide please. We have actually collaborated with our Department
of Education in our border regions. If the individual says that they want to find training
providers based on the occupation that they just found, we give them multiple ways of
finding that along with information on how much it might cost to go to school. Next slide please. They’re allowed to save
up to five resumes in our system, but they can only have one active at any given time.
One of the highlights of the new system is the individuals are able to rate their resumes. Standardized servers across the state will
be a standardized rating of the resume to give them ideas of how to make their grade
on their resume better. Next slide please. Of course, an individual could come in and
do job searching. There’s multiple ways they can do that. Now, with this system as part
of with grant, we are allowing the individual to connect to individuals on their LinkedIn
profile. If a customer is on our site and also logged
into LinkedIn, they’re able to do a job search, click on the find people that’s connected
through LinkedIn, and see who in their LinkedIn connections might have a connection to that
job that they just searched on. Next slide please. Individuals can also save
job searches so that the jobs can actually be sent to them that are coming to our site
and physically entering in the job search. This will be sent to them either weekly, daily,
biweekly, monthly or they can just come in and click a link and perform the search manually.
Next slide. Our guided tour is the step by step, and this
is how an individual basically be walked through the experience of our site. Next slide. Now
the interactive guided tour is slightly different. This is where they have to physically enter
in and everything as they’re being walked through the system. It allows them to be able
to have the electronic version of a staff person helping them register within our system.
Next slide please. This is basically our backpack at its full
site. This allows individuals to come into one place, print out and show all the schools
they’ve applied for their career profile. Everything associated with their career plan.
Next slide please. In the next couple slides, I’ll be able to
go through really quickly. The same that we’ve done for the individuals, once our work with
grant is up and we can beef up our employer side of the house, they’ll be able to do the
same thing. Right now a lot of the stuff is still based
off of what we have today. An employer can come in and click get started and move through
the regular steps today…Next slide; or they can come in and jump around like the individuals
do today. They can explore…Next slide; and from there they can also go in and see what
careers are out there. What local schools are out there providing
the same type of education to individuals that they’re looking for in their own jobs?
If an employer has a welding company, they can find out what local schools are putting
out welders, so they can reach out to that school directly. Next slide. That is basically what we have
today on our site that we have gotten as part of our with grant. I’ll take any questions
if you have any. Woman: OK, Tanya. We have one question at
the moment due to the time that I want to throw out to you. This question is, what kind
of resistance, if any, did you receive when you were planning your one stop system strategies
in roll-out? Tanya: Yes, we did get some resistance. We
had a lot of individuals who felt that what we were trying to do was take away work with
development jobs, because we’re trying to virtualize. We’re taking their jobs away. We fought that resistance by making them be
a part of the whole selection, coming and asking them, “What is the hardest part of
your job? What is it that you feel you waste the most of your time on?” Let’s allow an electronic version to push
that through, so that when you get that customer before you, you really feel like you are able
to give them your full investment, your full time. Another way that we handled that was, we also
allowed them to understand that once you get those individuals who come in and take up
your time, that customer who truly needs you to walk them through from A to Z, has more
time with you. You’ll be more fulfilled at the end, knowing
that you really did help a customer from beginning to end, as well as that customer is not missing
out on something because maybe during the process P, they weren’t able to make a workshop.
I think that was the best way we handled individuals who were not quite as on board with our virtualization
of services at the beginning. Woman: Those are very good outcomes in terms
of how you tackled that particular challenge. I want to thank you so much Tanya for your
presentation on what the State of Ohio is doing with their career transition services.
A lot of really good information that was provided today, which will be shared with
all of our webcast participants immediately after this particular event. What I’d like to do now is go over right back
to the room where we’re at and introduce you to our next speaker. Our next speaker is Ms.
Susanne Liebert. Ms. Susanne Liebert served as the lead for the human capital for the
Space Shuttle Program. Miss Liebert integrated space shuttle program
efforts to address the impacts of the shuttle transition and retirement, on the shuttle
workforce, both civilian service and contractors. This effort included the retention of critical
skills to fly out the shuttle program, and later transition off the program as the program
was ramping down. In addition, she has served as the manager
of NASA Space Shuttle Transition liaison office, which functioned as a clearinghouse by gathering
and disseminating information to the affected communities about opportunities available
through other federal, state, and local agencies. Miss Liebert is going to share her expertise
and experience on how NASA partnered with the affected companies and communities to
provide workforce transition support. Susan you may begin. Susanne Liebert: Thank you very much. Our
challenge was slightly different and what you’ve heard so far today and that we had
to do retention and transition at the same time. I’m going to talk on the next slide
a little bit about what I’m going to kind of cover with everybody. Talk a little bit
about the background; give you some context about what we were facing. Talk a little bit about some of the things
that we did in retention and then transition. The reason we split that between retention
and transition, or I did today, is because transition actually ended up being a tool.
We’ll talk a little bit more about that. It’s an end to help people off the rolls, but it
was also a tool to help us in retention. If people knew that we were going to take
care of them at the end, then they were more likely to stay with us until the end of the
program. Then talk a little bit about results. We have some, not as many numbers we would
like and then answer any questions if I can. Onto the next slide, talk a little bit about
some of the key events that happened for us in this activity. In January of 2004, the president announced
a new vision for space exploration and that involved cancellation of the space shuttle
program in 2010. Then in July of 2005, we returned flight at NASA. At that point, then
retention critical skills becomes a top program risk within the space shuttle program. That
is an awful lot of focus. They’re engineers. The top program risks tend
to be external tanks that don’t work or problems with the booster or something like that. If
that was happening at that time. Workforce very rarely made those kinds of risks and
so in this case that became a top program risk. Shortly thereafter…We’re focused on
this in 2005. Then in 2008, the financial crisis hit. While
that isn’t important in one way, it is in another because it actually helped us as far
as retention point of view. People didn’t have as many places to go. It kind of limited
them. Bad for them, honestly good for us. In February of 2010, we’re kind of getting
toward that last year plan, the president proposed a change in vision for NASA, which
was to change of focus from building our own rocket constellation, to going more commercial. That was a proposal in the president’s budget.
Shortly thereafter in April, there was a lot of discussion back and forth with congress.
They proposed a reformatted version, that which eventually passed in our authorization
Act in October that year. With the context…The reason that’s important
is, we have been trying to tell our employees, “Not everybody will transition, but you’ll
transition from shuttle to the future.” At this point, we changed the rules. At the last
year, you’re now having everything up in the air as far as where people might transition. Then in July of 2011, we did successfully
finish the space shuttle program, the flying piece of that program, and then in April of
2013, we actually finished the transition retirement, so the program is officially retired. On the next chart, again, just as a little
bit of context and background, in 2008, there were about 12,000 contractors and a 2,000
civil servants working in the program. Those were equipment, so you know that that’s an
“ours” kinds of thing. We have many more people that touched the program. What you can see on this chart is that it
was coast to coast. The majority of our folks were contractor employees, and we buy services
or we buy support or processing from those companies to fly the program. Those companies were in different positions.
Some companies, for example, like Keith Martin at Louisiana built the external tank, and
they could see their hardware on future rockets. Some other people couldn’t see their hardware
on future rockets, so it was a little murkier what their being placed path in the future
would be. There was a timing issue. The program was
going to end here. We are going to start flying in the future, and there’s a little bit of
a bath tub or a gap. With the president’s announcement in 2010, that changed that gap.
It changed how we approach all of this, but essentially the big thing is that we focused
on the employees. The next chart shows a little bit…The ramp
off. Part of what I want to show on this one is that the top half for the…You can’t read
the dates on the bottom. I apologize. All the way on the left is 2008. We start to see
it ramping down pretty dramatically. That’s when all the hardware was done. That first
top 6,000 people essentially built the hardware. Then, the last 6000 did shuttle processing. They prepare the shuttle for flight, and that
could be doing [inaudible 0:59:04] management. That could be putting tiles on the orbiter.
They had to touch the orbiter to get it ready to fly or touch the vehicle of the program
to get it ready to fly. Those folks didn’t have the gradual; they
had the cliff at the end. What you see is two different patterns in the way the employees
were affected. The next chart shows the fact that we did
have a partnership between retention and transition, and the first partner in that group was NASA,
of course. There was a lot of players at NASA. Then the next one was the affected companies,
then we had a number of companies, large and small, that were affected. Then the lastly
heavily impacted were the communities, so we pull them into this process. The next piece of that, you can see where
the…The reason I use circles is because there were places where those partnerships
interacted and we laid that out, and I’ll talk through what those boxes are in the middle.
Just in a little bit more detail before I transition to retention, just want to show
what some of the different tools we’re in. I apologize; I think this slide might be a
little hard to read on the web. The first column is some of the retention
tools. We’ll talk more about this later, but it tends to be about paying, and it tends
to be about training. The crosscutting notes that are both retention and transition, that’s
communications, which is huge. Everybody knows this, but you can’t underestimate communications.
Even though we knew that, we still probably did. Focused on training both employee and supervisor
training. Focused on employee recognition. I work in the organization, that’s a very
technical organization. They want to know how they’re doing, they want have measures,
so we try to have some measures that’s lost in the water there at the bottom, but we did
some surveys and attrition rates. On the right was the transition tools. You
heard a lot of…For example, from Ohio, then the earlier presentation from a military,
a lot of those tools are similar. It’s just how they’re deployed that that changes from
agency and organization situation, situation. Let me switch to retention here for a moment.
On the next slide, you can see in the red box there, that’s where NASA and the companies
came together to start with. What we did then as a team, on the next chart,
we benchmarked, and that was huge for couple of reasons. One is, not only what we learned
because we learned a lot of lessons learned and things to do and things not to do, but
it give us an amazing amount of credibility to folks that we could say “Well this is what
we learned from this company, this is what we learned from this agency”. We established a group to work together and
on the retention piece of it, it was very much focused on what the companies were doing
for their employees and so that maybe a combination of pay, that maybe a combination of training
and development. It became an area of emphasis and so in all
cases the contractors reported to the program manager about what they were doing in their
area. That group also looked at conducting surveys. We were only able to survey the civil servants
but the contractors surveyed their own folks so they were able to report on what they heard
in their surveys. One of the things we did is just a very integrated…These teams you
couldn’t tell who was contractors and who were civil servants is that we increased communication
across the program. NASA did a lot of communicating, the contractors
did a lot of communicating and we then shared all of that. On the next chart — I’m not
sure if this is readable on the web or not — but these are some of the tools of specifically. For example, on the communications, newsletters,
made heavy use of blogs. We used something call [inaudible 1:02:50] , tried to make it
a little fun, “Tell us what you’re hearing and we’ll be a little like [inaudible 1:02:55],
we’ll go off and tell you whether it’s truth or fiction.” We ask for feedback, and I don’t know about
your employees but ours will give it to us if we ask them. The first survey we did, we
had nearly 40% participation which is amazing for a survey, we did make a tactical mistake,
or I did I should say, that’s not we. I put in three questions where I could ask
for feedback for people to write in comments and all that 40 percent gave three comments.
I learned that the next time you do a survey, just asked for comments in just one place,
because you have to synthesize and integrate all that that but we had an amazing amount
of data that we used all the years of the shutdown in the program. A lot of mismanagement by wandering around,
so I can’t say that very well. Anyway we did ask for information and people gave it to
us. Provided training assistance for both supervisors and employees, and again we’re
on the retention side of this equation and so we really focused on the supervisors because
employees want to hear from those supervisors and so we wanted is to make sure that they
were equipped answer the questions. During this time, especially there is all
the consternation about the programs being canceled and transition, there’s a lot of
times we didn’t have answers. We were still trying to figure out the questions ourselves.
What we had to do was to tell our managers given talking points and say, “This is what
we know, this is what we don’t know. It is OK to say you don’t,” know and our employees
respected that. For the employees, we did focus on career
transition, what you are going to expect, and again this is all for both the civil servants
and the contractors. Job fairs not so much on the civil servants side but the communications,
the training, because many of our employees were going to transition from the shuttle
program which they had worked for maybe 20 or 30 years to something new. On the next chart we have some, again I mention
the severance but I would like to really focus on the employee contributions. Many of our
employees had worked — both civil servants and contractors had — worked on Shuttle since
the beginning and that was the late 70’s. The program was a living, breathing thing
to them and to lose that program was huge, and I think that was one of the biggest lessons
learned from some of our senior managers, was how personal that became for them and
for their employees as they went through that. We really focused on the celebrations and
what you see up there is something called “The Second Line.” Whats in the background,
I’m not sure if that comes through, is the end of an external tank. Those are built by
Lockheed Martin, [inaudible 1:05:26] Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana. One of the big things that they do, one of
their cultures down there is something called “The Second Line” and it starts off as a funeral
dirge if you will and then comes into a celebration. It happens after somebody passes away and
that’s what they did for the tank. They wanted to celebrate the fact, they’re
sorry that the program is over, but they wanted to celebrate that they finished strong and
that’s what’s on the t-shirts there. They did it in their culture, kind of following
on what Anna talked about earlier and were able to celebrate what they were able to produce.
They did finish strong and the program was amazing, the workforce. You can’t underestimate
them. They were wonderful. In the last monitored how we were doing. I
talked about that a few minutes ago. Let me transition to transition and then on the next
chart…Again, we were focused on retention. Some people start coming off the program in
2009, some people 2010, some in 2011. It was a gradual thing that happened, all that process. In the transition piece, there was a community
level piece and then there was an agency level piece. I’ll talk a little about both of those.
The first one, and I think Renee had talked a little about is the spatial transition lays
on office. On the next chart you’ll see that that was a congressional mandated. We found
it in our legislation, but it gave us the credibility and the tools, if you will, to
pull everybody together. Our role was to be a clearing house, and to
service a key contact, both internal to the agency and external, when people ask questions.
On the next chart what you’ll see is each player to this team brought something different.
I don’t know if its legible on the web or not, I apologize for that, but you can see
all the different states and all those organizations are state, local or federal government organizations. You’ll see all the prime contractors and you’ll
see all the NASA centers. All those people brought a piece of the solution, brought some
resources to bear into all of this and so as a team, we work together in different ways
but we all came together to work the transition for our employees. It was critical that we brought in all those
people. I’ve got another chart but I’ll say it here. We at NASA like to go solve problems
and create new solutions. This case we didn’t need to do that. You heard what they talked
about in Ohio, all the different kinds of things. For example they have…All workforce
boards have that. All state agencies have things that are similar. We didn’t need to re-create the wheel and
that’s something that we learned in this process. What did we do? On the next chart, talking
a little about some of the transition activities, we built those relationships…I’d say the
thing we brought most to the table is we brought together and we focused on communication. We brought in, for example, we benchmarked
with the Department and Defense on the Office of Economic Adjustment. They do brag. What
better organization that can tell us what happens to a community when you shutdown a
base? We talked to the Department of Labor. They
have all the rapid response kinds of things. We talked to the Department of Economic Development
and Administration, and a lot of that of course is about what can you do from an economic
development point of view? Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships
for example. They brought in job clubs, and that was something that was picked up by a
number of our workforce boards. Everybody brought a piece then we shared across all
of the different parts of the community and that’s probably the biggest thing. It’s getting
that information flowing from basically coast to coast. On the next chart, talk a little bit about
some of the, again, the telecoms, the statuses that we knew what was going on in the States.
This helped us to know, were their problems, were their issues, was one’s state having
issues that we needed to go talk to somebody in Washington in? The folks here were fabulous.
Both at all the organizations, Department of Labor at OPM, at Commerce, and all the
organizations that we interface with. In fact, kudos to OPM. One of the things that
we did do is partner with them on some job fairs, both virtual and live in Florida because
they were affected from a…Specifically because the economy wasn’t good in Florida at that
time. Kennedy Space Center is one of the largest employers in that particular county. The impacts
were huge there, and then their numbers were all at once.They didn’t get the gradual slip
down. It was all at once. We partnered with OPM to do a job fair down
there, and we had a number of employers, and over 1000 people came out to the event. Talking a little bit about some of the workforce
kinds of things. All the different workforce ports and centers and contractors, I had some
sort of job fairs. They all had the same kinds of assistance that we talked about earlier.
Three of them actually opened on-site or near-site assistance centers. For example in Florida they opened. In fact,
you can see up there is they have what they call the mobile unit. They actually took that
unit out to the workforce done at the Kennedy Space Center. At Lockheed Martin, for example,
they opened across the street. The Louisiana folks opened a workforce or transition center.
In Houston, they opened a specific aerospace transition center targeted to our workforce. In all those cases, where they were able to
build those partnerships and then really target the workforce, that was all done through grants
through the Department of Labor, through the Department of Commerce, the National Emergency
Grants, those kinds of things. The other focus is there’s always training
on helping people change careers. One of the things, sometimes, is what is it that I’ve
been doing, and I think we talked a little bit about, earlier, what have I been doing
and then how can that transition to someplace else. The other thing that if we train people, we
have to re-train them to something, and so that was a real focus. Also we see economic
development of having the Department of Commerce work with or provide the assistance or support
to the various economic development organizations in the affected communities. You saw, for example, some of the workforce
boards doing or economic development, partnering together to do things like Industry Days,
helping people translate aerospace skills to non-aerospace skills. One of the things
that happened during this time was the incident in the Gulf where the platform blew up. Interestingly
enough, safety became a very big issue in the aerospace or in the petroleum area in
an oil and gas. In Houston, that’s one of our big employers. That was a very natural
fit. We saw a lot of our folks with safety backgrounds
be able to go to oil and gas, in addition to others, but that’s an example. Then you
can see after this, a list of some of the other places where we have partnerships between
economic development and workforce and in the centers. Then on the next chart, talking a little bit
about some of the transition services provided. Again, you’ve heard some of these talking
a little bit about what the Department of Defense is doing, for example, what Ohio has
talked about, but a lot of these are the change management assistant, the resume writing,
the providing the support…Computer access for a lot of people is huge. Couple other things, peer support: One of
the things we found, for example, in Houston is people helped each other a lot. One guy
was an amateur photographer, so he put up a sign saying, “Hey, I’ll take your professional
pictures if you need one,” and got a lot of people that helped. People provided support,
provided feedback, provided guidance, practice with each other. The peer support was amazing. I think that
was helpful to them to be able to learn those skills. Teaching is a good way to learn a
skill. You had a lot of that thing going on. The job clubs we talked a little bit about,
the other resources that have been mentioned. Financial planning is huge especially if you’re
looking at layoffs, health insurance options, mortgage re-financing. What’s out there? One of the things that was important is we
used the companies, in this case, used the workforce boards to the rapid response to
talk to employees before they went off the rolls, and then you talk to them again as
we’re getting close to go on off the rolls. A little bit about like what they’re doing
with the service. You have to do it a couple of different times, and then they talk to
them again after they were laid off, because in some cases, it wasn’t real for people until
it actually happened. We had to get that message out a number of times. In conclusion here is, what were the results?
From the retention point of view, and this is one reason why I want to emphasize it is,
we were able to fly 22 missions safely and successfully; shuttle missions, which are,
as you can imagine, very complicated. Workforce was never an issue. There was a delay. You
could see that on that one chart, but that wasn’t…Workforce never became an issue in
all this, and I don’t think many of the senior managers spot that that would happen. They felt that workforce would become a problem,
and it never was. On a transition side, where appropriate employees were able to transition
to the new program, where we could do that, and then where they couldn’t do that and they
wanted services, they were all given services at a multiple levels of those services. Numbers are real hard to track at this point,
but we do believe…We’ve heard unofficially, set me paraphrase that or…Code said it’s
unofficial. 60 to 80 percent of the employees who sought the services were replaced. Many
people moved out the area. Of course, we can’t track those. Some people chose to retire,
and that’s actually helped us from a retention point of view. Some people wanted to have their name on the
last flight. They stayed till the end of the program, they were laid off and then they
chose to retire, so that was a win-win for us also. Woman: Renee, Any questions that have came
in? Renee: We haven’t received any questions this
far, however, you provide us with two photos. What I would like to do is for us to bring
up those photos so we can share it with the audience. The first is a group award picture
of a NASA team who made the NASA 2012 space shuttle workforce transition such a success.
Susanne, would you like to provide some comments and terms why this team was nominated as being
so successful? Susanne: What was really cool about this and
I talked a little bit about the human capital working group early on, but what I’m proud
most about this team is that it is…The people you see on that screen all worked tirelessly
from 2006-ish till the end of the program. You can’t tell, but that is a mix of contractors
and civil servants. When that photo was taken in Houston, it includes people from both coasts
and two folks that accepted the award on behalf of the team. One was a contractor and one
was a civil servant. To me, that picture is representative of the
partnership that we had in addressing this issue. Renee: That’s great. Let’s talk about the
second photo. Woman: [laughs] Renee: The second photo is a picture of one
of the job seekers. Give a few minutes to bring that up? Can you give us a little bit
more information about the scenes or about this particular job seeker? What’s the story
here? Susanne: I have mentioned that [inaudible
1:17:19] spatial Management helped us with a job fair in Florida and that what you see
are the very tired people at the end of the day. I’m sitting in the back on a table, actually,
and all of us are pretty pooped at the end of the day. This gentleman came in to say thank you. It
was a lot of work. He is a contractor employee and came in to say thank you for the efforts
that the government and their company and that everybody as a community had put in together. This is one of the things that made it all
worthwhile. It is the fact that you feel like you can make a difference. Renee: Thank you so much. Thank you so much.
Now, we are getting ready to transition into a final presentation. This presentation is
going to be provided virtually. What we’re showing right now is the actual photo of our
presenter, Miss Maria Heidkamp. She is the senior project manager for the
John Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. What I’m going to do
is, let me transition a little bit to give you some background about her. Maria is involved in research and technical
assistance projects on issues affecting older workers, dislocated workers, the long-term
unemployed, and persons with disabilities. She is currently researching promising community,
college-employee partnership models, and career pathway initiatives. She is also conducting
evaluations of several programs to help the long-term unemployed and job seekers with
disabilities. Her recent publications include Older Workers
Rising Skill Requirements and The Need for Re-visioning of the Public Workforce System,
Workforce for Adults, State Policies and Community College Practices to Better Serve Adult Learners
at Community Colleges During a Great Recession and Beyond, The New Unemployables, Old Job
Secret Struggle to find Work During a Great Recession. Previously, Maria worked overseas for US Department
of Labor and a US Agency for International Development as a technical adviser on dislocated
workers and economic development in transition economies. During which time, she served as
a Hungarian Ministry of Labor in developing a rapid response team. Wow. Maria is going to share her presentation on
recent labor market trends and the rise in long term unemployment. Maria, are you there? Maria Heidkamp: I am. Thank you very much. Renee: Great. I’ll turn it over to you. Maria: Good afternoon to everyone, and thank
you to Sydney and OPM for including me in this session today. My presentation is a bit
different from the ones you’ve heard so far. It’s not about a specific initiative but giving
you some more of the context of the labor market right now. Can you go to the first slide please? That
would be the one past the cover page. The great recession has officially been over
for several years, but it has had a profound impact on the labor market. It certainly affected
whether people worked, how much they work, how much they make, their optimism or pessimism
about the labor market, and how they’re coping. Next slide, please. Some of these labor market changes were underway
before the great recession, but they seem to have been exacerbated by it. We’re going
to just look for a minute at some of the changing realities of work in America. Pre-recession, we were used to thinking about
jobs as being permanent and the labor market as being more stable. Currently, we’re much
more likely to see jobs that are temporary and contingent, and the labor market is volatile
even for people who are highly skilled and highly educated. There was a sense previously that if you stuck
with a job and a career, you would advance over time. That’s been replaced with much
more of a sense of stagnation that the people may move between jobs, but they may not advance
along a career pathway the way they used to. We used to think about education as getting
through high school or getting through college, one and done and that was it. That is increasingly replaced with a need
for lifelong learning. Now I can say, even in the close to a decade that I’ve been at
the Heldrich Center, I know that I need to keep acquiring new skills, I need to take
advantage of courses, I need to know how to use social media and it’s all of these things,
and I think it’s not just true for me personally. I think it’s true more broadly. Healthcare of course has been a big topic
in the country the last few years. Historically healthcare was provided and often paid for
largely by the employer. We have much more of a sense of a shared responsibility for
healthcare. People used to have defined benefit pensions with mostly replaced with if you’re
lucky I define contribution pension or no pensions at all. There was a sense that you were striving if
you were lucky to get to maybe early retirement, and increasingly we’re finding that people
are sensing they might never retire. Next slide please. The Heldrich Center, we spent a lot of time
looking at this sort of new normal in the economy and it seems that we will continue
to see higher rates of unemployment and underemployment. Continued wage stagnation and falling workforce
participation even among people with high skills and high education levels. Next slide
please. I feel like this is all bad news and I apologize,
but we’ll keep moving ahead here. Unemployment even though it has been inching its way down,
it is still at 7.3 percent much higher than it was pre-recession, at 4.6 percent that
we saw in December 2007. This is true across all ages, educational
levels, for gender and ethnic groups, different occupations, it just really affected everybody.
We’ve seen that while older workers have a much lower unemployment rate — older workers
being people 55 and above, they have a lower unemployment rate than teenagers and young
adults. When older workers lose a job, their duration
of unemployment is often more than a year. It’s about 53 weeks on average compared to
about 19 weeks for teenagers. This is important because we’re going to talk about long-term
unemployment in a minute. Labor force participation is at a historic
low. There are some four million workers who have left the labor force and of course that’s
part of what is showing up as…Contributing to the reduced unemployment rate. Next slide
please, and that’s not exactly the reason we want to see unemployment go down. Under employment is high. There is some eight
million people who are working part-time for economic reasons, meaning they’d like to work
full-time but they can’t find full-time jobs and of course these people count as employed
in the unemployment statistics. Long-term unemployment is close to double
what it was pre-recession. There are some 4.3 million people today who count as long-term
unemployed, again defined as more than six months. Next slide please. In terms of where we’ve seen job growth in
recent years, much of it has been in low wage occupations and in low wage work. During the
recession employment declined across the board but more than half, 60 percent of the net
job losses were in what we would call middle income occupations, with a median hourly wage
between 1,384 and 2,113. What we’re seeing now is that it’s low wage
occupations with media and hourly wages between 769 and 1,383 that have accounted for more
than half of the job growth. It’s not a very pretty picture in terms of wages. Again as
I said job growth is predominantly part-time and not full-time and many of the jobs have
been in contingent work sort of part-time and there’s been very weak hiring relatively
speaking in full-time positions. Next slide please. The Heldrich Center has done a series of what
we call these work trend surveys in the past few years. It’s a nationally representative
panel study of people who lost jobs during the recession. One of the questions that we’d
asked for those who had found new jobs whether…Basically how they had recovered from the recession. Compared to your job, before the recession,
is your current job a step down, the same or a step up and for close to half of the
respondents their new job was a step down. Similarly more than half of the respondents,
54 percent said that their job was lower paying than their job before the recession. Next
slide please. Most people seem to think that these changes
are permanent. Again drawing on this work trans-panel, last January 2013, 60 percent
said that the great recession has left us with this permanent change in what normal
economic conditions are. Next slide please. We have been doing a lot of studying on long-term
unemployment. A couple of years ago it started to become apparent that long-term unemployment
of a new sort had entered the labor market. There was this wonderful frightening article
in the Atlantic in April of 2013 that drew on some research that had been done by the
Federal Reserve Bank in Boston. There’s increasingly evidence that people who are out of work more
than six months, it doesn’t matter what kind of skills they have, what their occupation
was, almost nothing else matters except the fact that they’ve been out of work that long
and employers seem very reluctant to hire the long-term unemployed. There seems to be some correlation in some
cases between the number of older workers that who have been hit with long-term unemployment,
but basically once you’re out of work more than six months your odds of getting reemployed
plummet. Next slide please. Long-term unemployment takes a terrible toll
on people emotionally and personally and of course economically. Over 90 percent of the
long-term unemployed said that their employment situation had caused stress in relationship
with family and friends. Close to half of them said it was a good deal of stress. One of the things that I find very troubling
is that 28 percent said they’ve seen negative changes in their children’s behavior for those
folks who’ve been out of work long enough to count as long-term unemployed. Next slide
please. Not surprisingly the long-term unemployed
are deeply pessimistic, which probably doesn’t help their employment chances. I’m not going
to read you all of these bullets here but, they’re not optimistic about their chances
of finding another job. Next slide please. I’m just going to talk very briefly about
some strategies to promote transition assistance. You’ve heard some great examples today from
the previous presenters and I think for me having spent time looking at the labor market,
looking at long-term unemployment, studying dislocated worker issues for years, I would
say the single most important strategy that you can use is to plan for and support early
intervention effort, pre-lay of transition assistance. We found this in Hungary during the early
’90s. We found this in examples from Canada in the ’80s, I mean this goes back to the
beginning of layoffs and studying transition assistance. Early intervention is just critical. If you really want to reach people before
they’re laid off, before they’re on unemployment assistance. A couple of people have talked
about working with their state or local rapid response unit. That is certainly something you can do sooner
rather than later to start to find out what kinds of pre and post layoff assistance they
can make available. You might consider depending on what kinds of layoffs you’d be contending
with, whether it makes sense to have an onsite transition assistance center or some sort
of reemployment assistance center. If you do that, that’s a good opportunity
to use labor management committees or employee management committees, as well as to use peer
counseling. Again I know a couple of the presenters have referenced peer counseling. We’re doing
an evaluation currently of a project to help the long-term unemployed. It’s called Platform
to Employment out of Bridgeport Connecticut. Some of you may have heard about it or may
have seen an episode of 60 minutes that features this program. One of the things we found in
the evaluation is how very important the peer counseling aspect is. The other things that they do are also important
but that the people who’ve been out of work for some long stretches of time, they’re isolated,
they’re depressed they’re anxious and it seems that they really took advantage of the opportunity
to connect with people in a similar situation and to kind of cheer each other on. Also drawing from the same platform to employment
as well as other models that have helped dislocated workers, you might consider incorporating
both mental health and financial literacy counseling into transition assistance efforts.
There may be people who are accustomed to have reasonably good or extremely good salary
and managing their lives, taking advantage of those resources. When there are all of a sudden unemployed,
it may be useful to have had somebody help them work through what they sometimes call
crisis budgeting. How to manage with much less and we’ve certainly found that that can
be useful in terms of helping people manage stress. Also what other resources are available
to them to help them during the stretches of unemployment. Next slide please. Assuming you’ve made connections to rapid
response or other workforce professionals in your area, it’s worse educating yourselves
about high growth industries in the region, what kinds of career opportunities exist in
those industries, what kinds of training might be available that people could take advantage
of before they’re unemployed to start chewing up credentials they might need. You should definitely look into that and you
should also find out related to that if there are efforts underway at local community colleges
that are targeted particularly to either older job seekers or adults in transition. Dislocated workers sometimes, what they call
non- traditional students. Not somebody who’s right out of high school going to school,
but somebody who needs to transition to a new industry or occupation. I am going to stop there and I would be happy
to answer any questions. I’m sorry to be last up at that here and have the most depressing
tale of all, but thank you very much for including me and I look forward to your questions. Renee: Well Maria right now we do not have
any questions in regards to your presentation but you provided another additional dose of
reality, and that’s the purpose of today’s event. Is to be able to provide key nuggets
of information to our audience to assist in with their transition program. I thank you
and I thank all of our presenters today. This information was really a significant and we
know it is to be a value to our audience as well. Before we conclude today’s program, there’s
just a few pieces of information I want to relay. I first want to thank Doctor Sydney
Heimbrock for her participation in her opening welcome remarks. Again a talented distinguished
presenters. You guys did an amazing job today. We really thank you. I also want to throw words of expression out
to our SWP talent management and program support team for putting this all together and helping
things to move forward in a very successful way. As well as our office of communications creative
team for making this all…The technology and the virtual connection, just making it
all possible. Where do we go from here. Everyone who registered for today’s webcast, you have
already received the presentation slots. If you did not receive this information or
if you have some questions that did not come up during today’s delivery, you can certainly
send that information to us at the address that Doctor Sydney Smith provided earlier,
which is essentially [email protected] Again it’s [email protected] However in about four to five weeks, today’s
webcast is going to post on the OPM’s media center. I want to put that out there so you
can keep n eye out for it. Which should be probably around the end of the year or early
part of January. We’re going to be sending out a short customer satisfaction survey right
after this event. Your feedback to us is very important. We
want to hear from you, we want to understand what your questions or your needs or any other
additional topic that we should look to leverage and pull together for our future webcast event. Most importantly your comments in regards
to the survey will be helpful feedback for us to provide to our presenters as well. Other
than that, that’s what I have in terms of closing remarks and I just want to let you
know that this concludes today’s event. On modernizing federal career transition programs
part two, thank you and have a good day. [cuts off]

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