News Strike – Military Working Dogs help the Military Police Force aboard MCAS Iwakuni

News Strike – Military Working Dogs help the Military Police Force aboard MCAS Iwakuni


Anchor:
This is your Inside Iwakuni News Strike. Military working dogs offer unique skill sets to compliment the Provost Marshal Office’s
Military Police Force. Lance Corporal Cheyenne Newman grabbed a leash to bring you the story.
Reporter: K-9 units aren’t just used in the civilian
police force. Military working dogs aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni are essential
to the military police as well. The dogs allow military working dogs, or MWD handlers, to
have a better sense of smell—and ears—in dangerous situations.
Sound bite: Cpl Nickolaus Hess, military working dog handler “The dogs nose is incredibly sensitive.
They can find stuff way before we ever could, whether that’s narcotics or explosives.
Having them on the installation helps with that, such as finding those dangerous substances,
this could affect people living on this installation.” Reporter:
These dogs not only have an amazing sense of smell to aid in detection but they also
make it easier to subdue an aggressor. Sound bite: Cpl Nickolaus Hess, military working
dog handler “In terms of the aggression if you have someone
whose being non-cooperative, it’s a less lethal means to use. It helps our job it makes
it way easier than having to pull out a weapon or having to discharge it.”
Reporter: MWD handlers train their dogs every day for
various situations. These exercises are continuous in order to establish familiarity between
the handler and their working dog. Sound bite: LCpl john David Barron, military
working dog handler “We train with our dogs day in and day out.
Even on off days, handlers will come in and train with their dog. The bond you share with
your dog is indescribable. And on your off days all you want to do is come in and train
with your dog.” “MWD training benefits my dog for real life
scenarios, such as building search, if we ever have to go for a barricaded suspect.
I’m willing to trust my dog that he searched that door he searched that room and he knows
that nobody is in there and that i’m letting other people in and the room is safe.”
Reporter: Reporting from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni
Japan, i’m Lance Corporal Cheyenne Newman.

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