Training Health Care Workers, Saving Lives

Training Health Care Workers, Saving Lives


The solution to every global health
crisis always hinges on one thing. A person, a doctor, or nurse. A midwife or
pharmacist or public health educator or volunteer trained in vaccinations. Every
health crisis whether affecting a small family or huge region depends on whether
the health worker on the ground has what he needs to do his job.
She is the linchpin to the entire system. He is the hero of every story. Give her what
she needs and she will turn the tide of the epidemic. Save the child, educate the
village, and teach her peers to do the same. The shortage of healthcare workers is
actually a crisis it’s only gonna get worse. Yes, we have a lot of doctors, we
have nurses, but they lack experience, they lack training. We have 200 million
children, those are under 14 years old but we only have 19,000 pediatricians. In
the country we do have problem with the shortages of trained health workers on
TB diagnostics and treatment. The population is growing, it’s growing at an
alarming rate and the health care workers are not there to meet the need
of the growing population. In South Africa due to the high disease burden
that we’ve had to deal with because of HIV and AIDS we have a very burdened
health care system and because of that we have a shortage of healthcare workers.
We’re estimating a shortage of about 13 million healthcare workers by 2035.
Currently, it’s about 7.4 million. We have to be working on this now to train new
health workers and to retain those who are already in service. Project HOPE
considers the health worker the essence of our global health work. Health workers
save lives, whether it’s HIV or TB, maternal child health, non-commercial
diseases, emergency response, all the areas in which hope responds we always
look at that through a health care worker’s lens. In the maternal-child health realm we’re really honing in on neonatal
mortality because newborn mortality has really not gone down at the same level
as other child mortality and maternal mortality. In the Dominican Republic, we’re working
with them on advanced care, intensive care units. In Sierra Leone, which has
some of the highest levels of newborn mortality in the world, we’re working on
the basics and primary health care just making delivery safe and clean providing
essential newborn care. Project HOPE has a lot of priorities and we do a lot of
great work but none of this work would be possible without our donors, our
partners, and our volunteers there are a number of organizations in the health
field but what makes HOPE so special is the sustainability of its missions. We
don’t go in and come out as soon as disaster hits in another part of the
world. We go in and we make sure that the local community can sustain itself, that
it has healthcare workers that are trained, that it has the life-saving
medicines that it needs before we leave. Our reputation is one of really working
with the local partners, our partners to help make a difference. There’s an awful
lot more that we can and that we want to do, but we can’t do any of that without
the generous support that we’re getting from corporations, from foundations, and
from individuals with big hearts. For me, what sets Project HOPE apart from other organizations it touches people’s lives. It saves the life by the center of
whatever Proect HOPE is doing it’s to save lives

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